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Worried about my eldest...

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by HelloKittyHannah, May 4, 2011.


  1. HelloKittyHannah

    HelloKittyHannah PetForums VIP

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    My eldest son (almost 7) has always shown an increased sensitivity to things, likes things done a certain way, other little things that make up a bigger picture...
    I always just thought he'd inherited OCD type behaviours from his Dad who has a lot of "issues" (anxiety, OCD's, never sits still unless engrossed in a video game, always thinks something bad going to happen)
    In the past my son used to repeat phrases a lot (still does occasionally) as the repeating himself eased off he started sniffing. It started when he had a cold, but then he carried on, sometimes sniffing 10 times or more in a row (each sniff about a second apart)
    As that behaviour severity faded, he's now blinking a lot. Long slow blinks and rolling his eyes at the same time. His sniffing is now sort of snorting noise that he does repeatedly.

    All this points to one thing... Tourettes :( I'm really scared for him!

    I'm not sure at what point to take him to the Dr's. I know tics and "quirks" can sometimes just be childhood phases but with his Dad's issues (a lot of which actually go hand in hand with Tourettes which I was unaware of) I can't help feeling this isn't normal childhood stuff.

    I just don't want him to feel like he has something "wrong" with him and if I take him to the Dr's he's obviously going to hear me talking about my concerns.

    Does anyone here have any experience with any of this? :(
     
  2. KathrynH

    KathrynH Guest

    I am sorry but i have not had any experience in this field but wanted to say that you could maybe go to the doctor's on your own to explain it to him, he may be able to book you into a child behaviour specialist or someone and then you could just go without it being like a "DOCTOR appointment etc.

    Or even phone the doctor and explain why you feel you cannot bring him to the surgery they may even come to your house as see him.

    I hope i have helped and hopefully someone will be along soon with some advice. xx :)
     
  3. Sampuppy

    Sampuppy PetForums VIP

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    These types of behaviours can also be part of other conditions not necessarily tourettes. Children on the autistic spectrum can sometimes have this type of behaviour - it doesn't necessarily mean that your son has a major problem or anything but if you go and have a chat with your doctor without taking him and explain your concerns, he may be able to make a referral to somebody who can help you. Sometimes understanding the reason for the behaviour makes it much easier to deal with and you can sometimes work out ways to help. Hope this sort of makes sense - it's hard to explain what I mean but I do understand your concerns as two of my children have issues similar to this.
     
  4. HelloKittyHannah

    HelloKittyHannah PetForums VIP

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    Thank you, I think I'll make an appointment to go talk to the Dr without taking him.
    Sampuppy, would you mind telling me a bit more about your kids and their behaviours? And what if anything the Dr's have done for them? (No worries if you'd rather not say)
     
  5. Sampuppy

    Sampuppy PetForums VIP

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    I'm happy to tell you more but i'll do it by private message if that's okay :)
     
  6. HelloKittyHannah

    HelloKittyHannah PetForums VIP

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    Thanks that'd be great :)
     
  7. cheekyscrip

    cheekyscrip Pitchfork blaster

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    I should say you have good reason to be concerned and first maybe the SENCO in school (special needs coordinator) can help you to get in touch with educatinal or clinical child psychologists as i think those specialists may have more experience and knowledge than GP...

    Your description inditates tics...which again might be caused by T syndrom or other reasons...

    They happen sometimes just as a passsing stage but still might be more to it so should be investigated as it may affect your child's education and social life...children will start making fun etc...

    Prepare what you may say..the onset..the duration...the triggers...?

    Tics may accompany ADD and ADHD...or just indicate nervousness in certain situations...

    Whatever you do never tell off and never draw any attention to that behaviour...

    Talk to the teacher, SENCO or doctor preferably on your own as to avoid making your child even more aware of his problem..which can make him more nervous and produce more tics...

    My boy around this age developed blinking...he is a bit hyperactive type...fortunately it stopped eventually....and was connected with some allergy reaction which triggered it initially...


    Which is also possible with persistant sniffle...so initially the doctor must rule out physical reason for sniffiling..like allergy...and if evertyhing is ok..then the child psychologist may be a good place to check in...


    One more thing which will do no harm but may help: the diet....some children are more sensitive than others to sugar, artificial sweeteners say..the E numbers..and they calm down and improve a lot by simple, homemade food...no fizzy drinks, sweeties and crisps...no sugary cereals etc...I have no idea - maybe that is what you give him anyway. and your life style involves lots of outdoor things.but activities outdoor, sports..lots of nature-contact...healthy diet and limited gameboy/computer/tv has very good effect in many ADHD, ADD and many other behavioral issues cases...and will do no harm?


    best luck
     
    #7 cheekyscrip, May 4, 2011
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
  8. xxwelshcrazyxx

    xxwelshcrazyxx PetForums VIP

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    I would be inclined to make an appointment to see your doctor, when you go for that appointment have your son waiting in the waiting room with his dad or another family member, you go in and explain about your worries and explain that your son is in the waiting room but you don't want him hearing you two talking and thinking frightening thoughts, this way your doctor will know why he is there from talking to you about it and then ask for your son to come in and check him over so he thinks the doctor is just looking over him.
    My son have ADHD and this was the only way I could get my son to even go into the same room as the doctor.xxx
     
  9. hazel pritchard

    hazel pritchard PetForums VIP

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    Does your sons school have a nurse? my g/son who is 9 ,had a recent change in his behaviour, when asked by his parents if all was ok he said yes, but they were still worried, so spoke to the school nurse and she arranged for him to have a school check up, she was really sweet and did all the "normal things" weighing him ,height etc then had a chat with him, it turned out another child in his class was giving him hasstle and my g/son told the nurse all about it,
    Hope all works out ok for your lad
     
  10. HelloKittyHannah

    HelloKittyHannah PetForums VIP

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    Thank you :) I've made an appointment to speak to the Dr (without my son) for next Tuesday. Hopefully they'll have some ideas.

    Behaviour wise he's a perfect child, rarely misbehaves. Not hyperactive in the slightest. The one symptom of ADD/ADHD he might exhibit is lack of concentration. While he can concentrate on reading a book or doing jigsaws for hours on end, school work or tidying his bedroom is another matter entirely. It takes him much longer than it should.
    In fact, thinking about it, I had his hearing checked about 6 months ago because everytime I'd walk in a room and ask him something he's say "what?" like he hadn't heard a word I said... another clear sign of his lack of concentration.
    I'd love to think the tics were a nervous thing, but actually he does it more when he's relaxed (or when he appears to be relaxed) Sat on the bus, going for a walk, playing in the garden... he does it in all sorts of situations.
    The sniffing, he isn't bunged up in the slightest, doesn't have a runny nose... nothing :confused:

    Hopefully this is just one of his quirks and it'll solve itself over time, but I at least want a Dr's opinion on it, even if they tell me it's just normal kid behaviour.

    Thanks again for the opinions x
     
  11. noogsy

    noogsy PetForums VIP

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    hi hun go to the dr discuss your babes problems and ask to be reffered to CAMHS.they will look into his difficulties...gps are not usually able to diagnose asd and aspergers.have a read at aspergers and asd forum.good luck with your son. x
     
  12. HelloKittyHannah

    HelloKittyHannah PetForums VIP

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    I really don't think he shows the typical signs of asd or aspergers, he's very sociable, makes friends easily, has no problems reading people or anything like that.

    I will read up about CAMHS though, thank you :)

    I spoke to my ex's (his dad's) Mum earlier. She says his Dad had a tic in childhood that he grew out of. So in one way that leaves me hopeful that my boy has just inherited some of his Dad's "stuff" (whatever it is his Dad has)
    Personality wise they are very similar.
     
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