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Wild animals visiting garden

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by kirstin, May 5, 2011.


  1. kirstin

    kirstin PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,

    I was about to buy 2 rabbits, bought a hutch then run then realised this is potentially a bad idea and looking for advice :blink: my house is in the countryside and is surrounded by fields, we often see wild rabbits, deer etc. in the field behind the house, squirrels and rabbits come into the garden.If I bought the rabbit would I be putting them or even myself or son in danger from a disease caught from a wild animal, fleas, worms etc? Would they be able to run around on the grass? Is a wild rabbit likely to come sniffing around the hutch?
     
  2. Lil Miss

    Lil Miss PetForums VIP

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    is there any way you can stop the wild bunnies getting in your garden? my main worry would be myxi, which wild bunnies carry, we do vaccinate domestic rabbits against it every 6 months, but the vaccine is not a preventative, it raises the rabbits immunity to it and increases their chances of surviving it, wild rabbits carry myxi, which is a man made diesise that was invented to control their numbers
     
  3. kirstin

    kirstin PetForums Newbie

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    Theres no real way to stop them, even if we replaced the fence so there were nno gaps theres still the gate and the neighbours fence they could get through :(
     
  4. kirstin

    kirstin PetForums Newbie

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    The hutch could be moved into a shed at night but is it then safe for them to be outside/in the run on the grass during the day?
     
  5. VampiricLust

    VampiricLust PetForums Senior

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    Myxomatosis is spread by biting insects, not just via wild rabbits, by any animal carrying fleas that passes through the garden, gnats/mosquitoes etc.

    If you were to have a run on the grass, I would make sure it is meshed on the bottom as well, so nothing can dig in, and the bunnies can not get out. I would animal-proof your garden so nothing could get in, but my biggest worry would be foxes- they can scale a 6-7ft fence easily, and are about in the daytime as well, not just at night like some people think.

    Or, you could always opt for having them as houserabbits!
     
  6. kirstin

    kirstin PetForums Newbie

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    There would be no room in the house for them.

    The run I bought is one with a roof and shelter and mesh flooring but it definately seems like too much of a risk :( hopefully I can return the hutch and run.
     
  7. Lil Miss

    Lil Miss PetForums VIP

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    could you convert the shed into a bunny house? you could pop some paving slabs outside and put the run on them attached with a cat flap
     
  8. kirstin

    kirstin PetForums Newbie

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    Converting the shed probably wouldnt work, its in direct sunlight all day and at the end of the garden where there is probably more wild animals coming by than where we were going to put the hutch. I could put something like thhis around it Galvanised Rabbit Guinea Pig Run Metal Pen - 6 Panel on eBay (end time 15-May-11 10:58:21 BST) just to keep anything walking around a few feet away from the hutch but I'm still confused re. being able to put the rabbits on the grass.
     
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