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Which course?

Discussion in 'Animal Jobs & Working with Animals' started by Marie24, Jan 23, 2021.


  1. Marie24

    Marie24 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone,I'm new here and just wanted some advice.i'm interested in doing dog training and behaviour courses but where to start? There are so many so was wondering if any knew of any good ones.I have heard good things about the think dog courses so that's a possibility. I've also seen the Victoria Stilwell courses,has anyone had any experience of her courses? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Alvina

    Alvina PetForums Junior

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    Hopefully any of these may be helpfull, to open as many doors as possible. I'm not sure on any specific training courses though.
    This is in no way supossed to sound patronising, most of these things I planned to do (and still am doing) straight after finishing uni back in the waste-of-time 2020 before Corona said nope:Shifty.

    Sorry this is a complete thought explosion:eek:...
    • What about buying a couple of up to date text books/manuals/studies on dog (or any other pet) behaviour and welfare. There are some great ones on amazon. Read them through to make sure the subject interests you. It will also give you some knowledge before comitting your self to any course. This will also get you accustomed to controversial subjects/issues in your area of interest (Like Victoria Stilwell uses positive reinforcement, others like Ceaser Milan use intimidation and the outdated, dissproved "Alpha wolf" theory).
    • When this pandemic is "over" what about some work experience with dog trainers of different fields (not sure what the correct terms are) e.g. obedience and agility, guard dogs, assitance dogs (for the hearing impaired, blind, diabetes ect..) - there are charities where you can volunteer to help train and socialise young puppies to become assitance dogs.
    • Volunteer at dog shelters - probably gain experience in how to recoginse, and deal with safely, different behavioural issues.
    • College diploma in animal behaviour/welfare/animal management - then foundation degree in animal management (2 years) - then get top up degree specifically in animal behaviour (1 year)
    • Get an apprenticeship with local dog trainer (with good reviews)? Ask how they trained/became a trainer?
    • Volunteer at zoo or petting zoo / look into therapy dogs. There are organisations that bring animals into schools and care homes, which need to be trained to tolerate noise and heavy hands.
    • Job/volunter at pet rescues/pet fostering - get them used to being around people, being touched getting them ready for their new home.
    • Pet first aid course - the PDSA hosts them. Helpful for any animal lover.
    • Maybe social networking at dog shows/events?
    • Substance detection dogs (again don't know correct names or terms :) ) - For airports, police, hospitals...don't know how you would get into this job though but I'm sure they may provide a training course.
    • I think City & Guilds do animal care and behaviour courses.
    • Read scientific articles/studies on dog behaviour - its good to know the past and present influential ground breaking people in your field of interest - will look good in fancy job interviews. Also you will be able to win debates/discussions with people of outdated views, I'm not saying argue with people but it proves dedication and thorough knolege of your career, also refering specific articles to that person will help educate them (and shush them up;)).
    • Also behaviour is an intuitive, holistic area of animal care, so by understanding influential scientific papers with solid scientific facts these will go hand in hand to prove why that dog is behaving that way e.g recoginising behavioural signs a dog is in distress, why might these behaviours be useful/beneficial to the animal and then find the cause (e.g. medical or classical or operant conditioning, if its a rescue dog) and finally how to help the animal and owners.
    Sorry it's so long :Shy and some points may not be directly related to your question.
     
  3. Marie24

    Marie24 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for taking the time to post. You've gave some good points there and definitely helpful.will differently start looking into a few things and as we're in lockdown got lots of time to properly do some research and look into things mentioned so thank you very much for advice you've been most helpful
     
  4. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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  5. Marie24

    Marie24 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for replying.yes I have looked at these courses and seen they expensive so would have to save up for a bit
     
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