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When to trust kittens alone

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by rubyruby, Feb 19, 2021.


  1. rubyruby

    rubyruby PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone! One month ago I adopted two female kittens and they've settled in so well. They're 10 months old and former street kittens. But I worry a lot about leaving them on their own!
    The set up we've had so far is that they have a room completely dedicated to them with their litter tray, food, beds etc and some safe toys that they go in at night (rest of day they're allowed everywhere) and they're very happy to, they sleep great and wait for me to get up and give them breakfast all very easy and calm.
    Until recently, they've also always been happy with going in there during the day if I need to go to the supermarket or for a run etc. I barely go out these days obviously due to covid but I love having the feeling of security knowing they're safe in there.
    Thing is, they've now stopped going in there when they know they're about to be locked in during the day (night is still fine). If I put down food down in there they bolt to make sure I don't shut the door on them. If I throw toys in there they won't follow the toys if I'm behind then. They know what's going to happen!
    But I don't know if I trust them in the main flat. I have one large kitchen/living/dining area with no other doors. And I just don't know what they'd find to get up to in the time I'd be gone. For now I've been going out only when they're asleep and rushing to shop quickly whilst I know they're not roaming around.
    I just fear what they will find to get into mischief with whilst I'm away!! Is that just me being paranoid? I have kitten proofed my place to best of my abilities obviously but if they have a long stretch I don't know what they'd get up to. And believe me if they won't go in there room, they won't. I can't make them. But I can't be trapped in my house 24/7 because of them (no matter how much I love them haha!)
     
  2. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    If you are happy that you've cat proofed everywhere the best you can, you haven't got anything precious or breakable in reach, toilet lids are down if they have access to loos, there are no flowers or plants that could be nibbled or windows left open, then be brave and leave them. You'll probably find that they just sleep while you're out anyway.
     
  3. rubyruby

    rubyruby PetForums Newbie

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    You're absolutely right. I think I know it too, it's just the anxiety! As far as I'm aware everything is as kitten proofed as it can be. I will try a few short trips and see how we all manage!


     
    lymorelynn likes this.
  4. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    As above. If you've cat proofed your home, no loose strings, nothing that can be knocked off and broken, nothing that can be pulled over if they try to jump on it, no way to get out..it's time to trust them. They are telling you they can be trusted by refusing to be shut in during the day.

    Each time you leave and come back and find them fine it will get easier for you.

    When Queen Eva was a tiny Baby, she had to live in one room for a couple of weeks, and even a crate for a week before that, she was so small. Even after she had the run of the house when I was home, I was still putting her in the bathroom at night. She would trot in on her own when I started brushing my teeth.

    On the 7th night after she'd been freed from all other restrictions, when I went to brush my teeth she didn't come. I called and she didn't come. I went looking for her and found her on the bed, with the other three cats. I said "Are you coming?" and instead she gave a big stretch and knead on the blanket and blinked at me. It was clear to me she was saying "I'm ready to sleep here now" and I decided she was right.

    She did the same thing when I started taking her out into our enclosed yard, by the way, let me know when she no longer needed to be put in the carrier for back and forthing, that she could be trusted not to bolt.

    Cats are smart, if we pay attention to what they are telling us. :)
     
    buffie likes this.
  5. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Here's the shot from that moment :)
     

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