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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best food for my cat? Should i use:
a) store-bought, wet, canned food (Whiskas Friskies pate is what i currently use)
b) wet home-made food (include recipe please :))
c) dry food (what type? i've been advised against this due to worries about dehydration)

I was also wondering if anyone knew the breed of my cat. I'm assuming she's a tabby plus something long-hair since she has longish soft hair, long tail and hairy ears.





Much appreciated everyone!
 

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She's beautiful! And looks just like my first cat, who when I took him to the vet, they said they thought he looked like a Maine Coon cross. Spend some time looking at different breeds to see what you think, you'll never know 100% if you weren't told by the person you got her from, but I had great fun convincing myself my little kitten was a Maine Coon (and now I have 4 I loved the breed so much!!)

As for food, I've had my cats on all different things. I would say store-bought brands wouldn't be the most popular - though many cats are completely fine with it. I've never tried making my own wet food, but I have fed my cats a raw diet, which proved pretty costly but I must say my cats LOVE.

I now have them on Royal Canin, both wet and dry. I would say this is one of the better brands out there.
 

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Only that that was what I was told by the breeders I got my cats from, and their gastro intestinal food has done so much good for one of my cats that I'm quite a fan.

I'm sure there are loads of different brilliant cat foods, and different ones work for different people/cats. Mine do well on Royal Canin that's all :)
 

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Only that that was what I was told by the breeders I got my cats from, and their gastro intestinal food has done so much good for one of my cats that I'm quite a fan.

I'm sure there are loads of different brilliant cat foods, and different ones work for different people/cats. Mine do well on Royal Canin that's all :)
Ah! Not many people on here - including me - would share your sentiment of RC being one of the *better* brands out there but I can see why you think that. At the end of the day, everyone has different ideas of what a "good" brand of cat food is and as you say, different foods work for different cats.
 

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Ah! Not many people on here - including me - would share your sentiment of RC being one of the *better* brands out there but I can see why you think that. At the end of the day, everyone has different ideas of what a "good" brand of cat food is and as you say, different foods work for different cats.
At the moment "good" for me is the only thing that has helped get a poorly kitten back to good health! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First off, thanks for all your replies.
She eats literally any food i put in front of her, so i'm more concerned about giving her the right nutrients (whether that be directly through the food or additional supplements).

Like i said, this is my first ever cat and would appreciate any pearls of wisdom. Food related or otherwise.

thanks again!
 

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This below is my missive - sorry for the cut and paste - I can't type this out 4 times a day.

Firstly if you can try to get them off the dry - they do love it - but we like cake but don't eat it all the time! It's full of completely unnecessary carbs that are there to bulk the food out and make it cheaper for the manufacturers to produce. Add to that that cats find it incredibly hard to metabolise you end up paying for them to poop it out. The additives and sugars that are in dry are a contributory factor to feline obesity.
Also dry is incredibly dehydrating for cats as cats have evolved to get 99% of their fluids from their prey and so have no natural thirst drive. For each 50g of dry they eat they need about 1/2 pint of water to counteract the dehydrating effects. Even with a water fountain most cats find this a hard amount of water to drink.
Dehydration can lead to kidney problems, UTIs and crystals forming in the bladder. This is especially bad for neutered boys (no idea why neutered) but boys because they have a longer urethral tract and often the crystals get stuck in their willy when they try to pass them and it is incredibly painful. Obviously not all cats will get this - but you have to weigh up the risks and decide to do what is best for you.

The worst wet is better than the best dry. Yes even Whiskas and Felix!

For wet the higher the meat percentage the better. I like to feed anything above 60% but tend to go for 97% or more, watch out for the offal content though.

I personally feed a mixture of raw, Bozita, Aminonda Carny (was feeding Smilla but it's just changed and I won't be buying it again), and Grau, I have fed Natures Menu and Hi-life in the past, and probably will again to replace the Smilla. Other good ones are Petnatur, Tiger etc. These foods are found either at Pet Supplies, Pet Food, Dog Food, Cat Food and Pet Accessories at Zooplus or other german suppliers. Other have ordered from the other suppliers but I haven't had the courage yet. Nature's Menu can be found at [email protected] as can Hi-life.

If you really need to feed dry - look at Orijen, Applaws, and Acana - these are grain free.

As with all good food they may seem more expensive (wet and dry) to begin with, but you feed less and they poop less, AND it's a lot less smelly.

Hope that helps.

Page Cannot Be Found
Does Dry Food Clean the Teeth? | Little Big Cat
Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition :: healthy cat diet, making cat food, litter box, cat food, cat nutrition, cat urinary tract health
cat nutrition - blog
Feline Urinary Tract Health: Cystitis, Urethral Obstruction, Urinary Tract Infection by Lisa A. Pierson, DVM :: cat urinary tract health
Kidney Failure in Cats Symptoms and Treatment

I suppose it's all about risk.

Many people will quote the old lady down the road who smoked like a chimney, drank a quart of scotch a day, never exercised in her life and lived to be a 100. But they omit to tell you about the 50 others that fell by the wayside along the way. You did really well with your cat. But . . . and here's the crunch; was it a solely indoor cat fed ONLY that and not supplementing it's diet outside. If it was you got lucky, if it wasn't then the natural food it ate helped it along.

It's a very difficult and potentially contentious subject - pet foods have taken off in the last 25 years - the market is now HUGE and not enough adequate research has been done into the health effects and benefit of all these foods. The research that has been done is rarely independent and never long term. When we had my first cats they ate what was there, there were no dry foods, they hunted to supplement their diet (in fact that's what most cats were kept for - vermin control), there were no kittens or breed specific foods and yet most did well. Obesity and diabetes and kidney failure were rare. And yet all of those are on the rise in our feline population - as it is in humans.

And what is the contributing factor, what has changed for both us and cats? - DIET.

Cats can't digest grains/ carbs - but the makers of Felix and the like use a lot of grains/ cellulose fillers etc in their foods as it is actually cheaper than meat. So the cats struggle to digest it, what they do digest interferes with their biological systems and sometimes causes them to put on weight (as that is the bodies way of dealing with excess carbs), this then interferes with insulin production etc and you end up with diabetic cats (not all, just some). This is why cat poop on that diet stinks - they are getting rid of noxious waste. You pay for them to poop most of the Felix type food back out again and because the body doesn't like it it struggles to process it making it smelly in the process. Cats fed raw have almost odorless poops. Add in the fact that dry is a (imho) major contributing factor in UTIs, crystal forming, and kidney disease and you begin to see a bigger picture.

It's all about risk and minimising it. You can feed supermarket foods (and some are better than others) and your cat could live to be in its 20s, of that there is no doubting - but what if your cat is one of the other 50 that won't get to twenty and is more prone to weight gain, chronic kidney failure etc. You weigh up the risks and how to minimise them, you do your research, and then you make an informed choice. And if after all that you still want to feed Felix etc then do so.
 

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What a gorgeous cat you have! I think the best food is different for every cat. Mine love Vets Kitchen Dry food, with half a tray of Sheba each day. They just aren't big wet food eaters, Lucky and Rigsy would rather starve themselves and Skye just gets sick when eating wet food.

Each cat is different.
 

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What a gorgeous cat you have! I think the best food is different for every cat.
I don't think I agree with this. Cat food can be "good" or "bad" irrespective of the cat. At the end of the day, each cat has the same nutritional needs. Although most cat foods - complementary foods excluded - are encouraged to follow certain guidelines to make sure that they address those needs, they are not created equal. I know, going by my yardsticks, which foods I would feed and which ones I wouldn't - irrespective of the cat. True, there are some exceptions as more and more cats have certain intolerances but doesn't detract from the fact that some foods are "better" than others (going by my yardsticks).
 
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