What to look for in a Trainer or Behaviourist

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by RAINYBOW, Apr 15, 2010.


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  1. leashedForLife

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    may i remind the forum at large of the topic of this thread?

    it is how to select a trainer [who trains dogs and/or instructs their owners or handlers] or a behaviorist -
    anyone qualified as a behaviorist in the USA has academic credentials from one source or another,
    either a 3rd-party credentialing organization [APBC, IAABC, etc] or a college or university.

    this thread covers what credentials if any, skills, affiliations, etc, the owner should look for, as well as being aware
    that they want someone whom their dog & they themselves will get along with - the trainer or behaviorist should
    accommodate their learning style, find out what appeals to their dog, and otherwise suit them - a good fit. :thumbsup:
     
  2. edidasa

    edidasa PetForums Member

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    fascinating thread. i guess this discussion goes on in lots of other forums too.

    i'm not pro e-devices, or against them - but i do think that trainers 'should' open themselves to learning more about these devices.

    I'm also not saying the ppl on this forum should either....

    For example, in playing tug with your dog - there is a school of thought that believes this should rarely be done, or at least the owner should ALWAYS win.
    In my learnings, tug is (for some dogs) one of the most rewarding games to play with an owner - and letting them win just makes them want to play more with you.

    Sure, there should be 'rules' to the game, but my point is if I was a trainer that was not open to new ideas or 'different schools of thoughts' I don't think I would be very good.

    Shame, there's no qualification on 'how to use a choke chain, e-collar, prong collar, e-fence'.... or is there? (maybe I spotted a gap in the market) ;)
     
  3. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    So perhaps when selecting a Trainer or Behavourist, we can slip in some questions?

    What are your rules for tug with a typical non-aggressive family pet?
    Should I work on becoming a better Pack Leader?
    What % of cases does neutering reduce aggression, mounting in bitches & dogs.

    Developing a list of "controversial" topics, subject to popular memes, might help sort out the sheep from the goats, test communication skills and perhaps avoid wasting time double checking claimed qualifications and such.
     
  4. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    Never letting the dog win at a tug game is surely an idea to do with the pack leader rubbish that modern thinking people are trying to dispel. The dog doesn't know whether he has won or not. The thing is be sure the game ends when the owner wants it to end, not who wins.

    As to qualifications on the use of the devices you mention, you may find more information at an S & M club. Members of such an establishment would have the only use for them that I can imagine, and used with full consent of the participants, unlike the helpless dog who has no say.
     
  5. ClaireandDaisy

    ClaireandDaisy PetForums VIP

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    What I look for in a trainer or behaviourist (and we`ve had many, believe me) is experience, kindness and patience.
    I have walked away from the know-it-alls and the martinets. I have told the bullies where to get off and voted with my feet regarding the incompetent.
    A good trainer or behaviourist is a treasure.
     
    dogcompanion likes this.
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