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What to do after other dog attacked your dog

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by KLM, Sep 9, 2013.


  1. KLM

    KLM PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,
    I have following problem – my 1year 8 month old black Labrador was attacked by neighbour dog 2 weeks ago no injuries or anything, but just the fact that the incident happen, neighbour dog (we have had several problems with our neighbour dog, as he ALWAYS barks or growls as soon as he sees my lab, he’ll try to jump over a fence or even get in our yard, put his head through our fence and just bark at him) jumped on my Lab, was trying to bite him, as I pushed him away he started barking and growling at us. My Lab has never shown any signs of aggression even when other dogs have behaving aggressively towards him, but in this situation he started barking back etc., ….anyway the situation got resolved but the thing is that this incident has left my dog very scared and panicky and his behaviour has changed. Now he will try to go as fast as he can to pass the neighbour’s house, he will even pull me just to get away from their house ASAP, he will not go in the yard on his own (not even the back garden), only if I will be outside with him, he will play with his toys or just lay in the grass, but as soon as I go back inside he will follow me (he has never done that before, he could spend hours just sitting in front garden watching people pass by or just having little naps etc.) Now every time we go for walk and if there is any other dog in our way he’ll freeze and not move, I get him to move with treats or just stand with my back turned to other dog and wait until he’ll pass by, but the weirdest thing is that all the dogs we have met in past 2 weeks have ALL shown signs of aggression towards him, every single one of them has barked at him or growl at him (even the friendly ones), so now I don’t know what to do? Have anyone had this problem before? Or any thoughts of how I could help him?
    Thanks,
     
  2. lostbear

    lostbear Bear right at Newcastle . . .

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    This is very sad indeed - it's obviously affected your poor dog's quality of life.

    I would suggest that you dog-proof your garden so that the neighbour's dog can't get in, if you haven't already. Re: the other dog putting its head through the fence - get one of those pump-action water pistols (the big ones), and give the bugger a soaking! I don't think you'd have to do it more than a couple of times to keep him away, especially if you can keep out of sight so he can't work out where it's come from. Unfortunately where there is a boundary, a dog will patrol and defend it if he regards it as his territory, so I doubt you can stop your neighbour's dog from barking.

    Your lab has obviously lost all of his confidence. Do you know anyone with a very gentle, elderly dog, who could walk with you, or who you could visit with your dog, and invite to your home (only when your boy is used to him/her)? This might help him to realise that not all dogs are out to get him.

    I think that because he is afraid of other dogs now, he sends out a scent which tells them that he is not up for being approached in a friendly manner, and maybe a bit of fear mixed in. This may be what the other dogs are responding to. Dogs rely on these pheronome (scent) messages much more that we realise.

    There are a lot of very experienced people on this forum, many with general dog knowledge, and others with breed-specifice awareness. I'm sure that one of them will be able to help you.

    Have you had your dog from him being tiny? I ask because if not, there may have been other things that have happened to him that you are unaware of, and this attack is just the icing on the cake, so to speak.

    I do hope you get the problem sorted, for both your sakes. It must be very distressing.

    If you re-post in the 'dog behaviour/training' thread, your query may get picked up more quickly by someone with more knowledge than I have.
     
    #2 lostbear, Sep 9, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  3. Knightofalbion

    Knightofalbion PetForums VIP

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    A very warm welcome about to the forum.

    A fine post by Lostbear. Yes, your dog is traumatised, I expect any of us would be if someone had attacked us for no reason.

    I'm not sure about blasting the neighbour's dog with a water pistol... I'm thinking that maybe a more solid fence is needed. Your dog is 20 months old, that's young... It would be a good investment.

    Your neighbour's dog clearly has a territorial issue and the fact that your dog is actively scared will be sensed by the other dog and he will be emboldened by that.

    Being able to see each other is upping the ante. A new solid fence or reinforcing the old fence if money is an issue would help create a divide in both senses.
    Would help restore your dog's confidence. He is probably reasoning if the head can come through the fence, the rest of the body can too..

    So definitely a fence.
    A purposeful walking stick when you go out - not to use I hasten to add, just to reassure your dog, and make that dog and others wary of attacking your dog.
    If it really is something that can't be sorted out over a cup of tea, maybe a word with the local dog warden, or an anonymous report of aggressive behaviour.
     
  4. ellenlouisepascoe

    ellenlouisepascoe PetForums VIP

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    Hello and welcome KLM!

    I'm so sorry to hear what happened, it sounds like your boy has been terrified by the ordeal so no wonder he's steering clear of other dogs.

    My Mum has a Labrador that was attacked by a German Shepherd out on a walk , it came out of nowhere and it's owner had no control over it the ordeal lasted about 5 minutes while the other owner managed to grab and remove her dog from the situation, while my Mums dog cowered and squealed trying to get it away.

    After that happened she stopped being interested in other dogs, tried to avoid them didn't play with her normal doggy friends at the dog field and just stuck dead beside whoever was walking her nervously , wanting to turn back as soon as she saw another dog.

    What has helped her majorly with this is introducing her to a puppy, my puppy to be precise, however as lostbear said it could also be an older calmer dog if your dog doesn't like pups. She's not 100% there yet but she now plays / runs / nibbles my pup happily and doesn't seem as nervous on walks, she doesn't like a leadless unknown dog running up to her in a field but she's more likely to politely be interested in a dog passing and isn't running to the hills.

    I think Labs are one of the most sensitive breeds and their feelings are easily hurt, and boy do they remember things!
     
  5. KLM

    KLM PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all for advice :) Much appreciated.
    Yesterday we had walk with his “walking buddy” Lars was keeping his distance for a long time, but in the end of the walk it seemed that he was feeling a little bit more confided about himself, have planned a weekend visit to our friend who has Golden retriever puppy of 10 months, so I’ll see what happens.
    I had Lars since he was 7 weeks old so I have been with him ever since, he has been with dog sitters for 4 weeks in last year but they have never reported accidents or anything else back to me.
    The issue still has to be resolved as the neighbours have been ignoring my attempts talk to them regarding their dog’s behaviour – his owner has -not sure about diagnose or if there is any, but he is “2 sandwiches short of a picnic” (sorry if that’s too harsh) and he ignores me completely where’s his parents don’t have anything to say or “don’t see why they should get involved” as the dog belongs to their son.
     
  6. lostbear

    lostbear Bear right at Newcastle . . .

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    You are are on a hiding to nothing by the looks of it. If he isn't prepared to compromise, or even keep his dog under control there is little you can do, unfortunately. What I would do, though, is report any attacks to the police. If everyone his dog goes for does this, they will be forced to have a word with him - it may or may not do any good - could even make him worse (if that is possible), or it may make him more careful. After all, all you want is the dog kept under control, and that's a legal requirement anyway.

    I'm glad that you have some doggy companions to help yours get over his horrible experience. Hopefully, if nothing further happens Lars will be back to his old self very soon.

    Shame that your neighbour isn't a bit more approachable.
     
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