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What kind of rabbit to buy?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by finoni9, Jul 2, 2010.


  1. finoni9

    finoni9 PetForums VIP

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    Am considering buying a rabbit but doing research first. Have read the post on info for new rabbit owners which is very helpful.

    However, can you all give me input into the different types of rabbit? I am thinking of an outside rabbit but don't want a huge one?

    Any ideas? Thanks :)
     
  2. AmyCruick

    AmyCruick PetForums VIP

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    I would recommend taking a trip to your local rescue centre. There are so many rabbits looking for homes. Its also better to get two rabbits and not just one as they are very sociable animals and get lonely when on their own. The rescue centres usually also carry out home visits and so will advise you on what sort of accomodation etc they will require.

    If you get your rabbit from rescue, they may have a pair of rabbits already bonded, if not then they usually help to do the bonding for you which is brilliant as bonding isn't always easy. They will already be neutered and vaccinated so will save you money too! Plus you can get to know their temperment etc before you choose a pair.
     
  3. finoni9

    finoni9 PetForums VIP

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    What happens if I get baby rabbits? Can you bond them and how do you stop them breeding until they get neutured?
     
  4. AmyCruick

    AmyCruick PetForums VIP

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    If you are buying baby rabbits then it is easier to bond a male and female but two females/males can also be bonded. Two females is probably easier than 2 males. If you have a fmale/female you will need to house them seperatly until they are old enough to be neutered (around 6 months old). Both will need to be done (About £65 for males and £80 for females) Even if you get a single sex pair they will need to be neutered to avoid aggression and uterine cancer in the females.

    Once they've been neutered you need to wait 6 weeks for their hormones to settle down and then you can bond them. Bonding needs to be done on neutral territory and you will need to set aside 3 days to keep an eye on them. Its not pretty unfortunately- Lottie hated Alan for the first two days. I spent 9 hours sat in the bathroom breaking up fights! Next time I'm going to leave it to a rescue to do it for me :)
     
  5. finoni9

    finoni9 PetForums VIP

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    Thanks for all that info!

    If you get them from a rescue centre - a little bit older so they are neutered and bonded - will they still be ok to handle? I want to be able to handle mines (our neighbours bites)?

    (I have seen 2 in the local RSPCA who are one year old, one male one female and in the photos they are sitting close by each other so they obviously are bonded)
     
  6. BattleKat

    BattleKat PetForums Senior

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    When you say handle, what do you mean exactly?
    Most rabbits will tolerate or even enjoy a bit of stroking but very very few enjoy being picked up, I try to avoid it with mine wherever possible simply because I know as prey animals they get very stressed out being off the ground. This is the same whether you get them young or not.

    A rescue is really a great way of doing things - you save on the cost of neutering and vaccinating, no hassle of bonding and you know a little more about their health and a lot more about their adult personality.
     
  7. Kammie

    Kammie PetForums VIP

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    I've had a total of 8 rabbits over the years and out of those only two of them tolerated being picked up and even then they had to be in the right mood for it.
     
  8. frags

    frags PetForums VIP

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    If you want a cuddly bun go for a Dwarf lop, i breed the Dwarf lops and out of all ive bred these are the only buns that love a cuddle. If you do decide on a Dwarf lop and you are going to buy 1 young then buy from a good breeder, not just someone advertising a Dwarf lop as people tend to advertise anything that has lop ears as Dwarf lops lol.
    This actually goes for any bun, older bun = rescue, young bun then either a rescue or a good breeder (breeders are usually cheaper than pet shops).
     
  9. crofty

    crofty PetForums VIP

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    Be great if you could rescue a bun, honestly rescue a young bun thats already neutered and bonded, much easier, rescues average donation fee is £40 thats the bun, its neutered and vaccinated! Plus you will already know the personality and wont have hormones to deal with, cut out the hassle! All mine are rescues :)

    Where abouts are you?
     
  10. finoni9

    finoni9 PetForums VIP

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    Thanks - from all the advice (on here and elsewhere) it seems getting 2 young bunnies from a rescue that have been neutered and bonded is the best way to go - I'm in South Yorkshire - have sourced a rescue near me that other's have recommended :)
     
  11. emzybabe

    emzybabe PetForums VIP

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    I resuced a lovelly xbreed last year, it was great knowing he would be the perefect partner to my existing rabbit and for me too. He was the right size temerment everything I could ever dream of.

    Many pet shop rabbits are sold with incorrect dates so you never know if their only 6 weeks or 3 months if they will grow or not, also the change in diet moving from inside to outside etc can be really horrible for them.

    you will save a lot of money in the long run on buying the correct set up as advised by your local rescue (the rspca even sell good size hutches) getting a rabbit that has had both vacinations and has been neutered/spayed. (my vaccinations cost £40 and spaying can be another £120)
     
  12. crofty

    crofty PetForums VIP

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    Oh thats fantastic!!!! :D You must post pics when you find a pair :)

    Oh i know these arent babies but i just adore these two :)

    http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/moreinfo.asp?RabID=18583
     
    #12 crofty, Jul 3, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2010
  13. AmyCruick

    AmyCruick PetForums VIP

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    If you get from a rescue you can visit and see if they are ok to handle etc before you choose one. Thats why I prefer rescues cos you know what sort of personality they will have. As others have said though most buns don't like being picked up. I rarely get to cuddle Alan but Lottie will let me pick her up for short periods of time- Lottie came from rescue and I chose her as she was the only one who let me pick her up!

    Hope you find a nice pair of buns-show us some pics when you do :)
     
  14. AmyCruick

    AmyCruick PetForums VIP

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