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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just something I have wondered about... Please forgive me if I'm wrong :eek: but as far as I can tell, it seems that pups go to their new homes at around 8 - 10 weeks but on here I often read that kittens should be older.
Why is this :confused:
 

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I don't know about dogs as I have never had them but I have been fortunate enough to see my kittens (currently 13 weeks) grow from birth and can tell you that at 10 weeks (my last visit) the kittens are still very much in need of their mum.

They have not had their final vaccinations (12 weeks) and are still feeding off their mum's milk, getting vital antibodies. they are also still learning about playing with their claws retracted, how far they can bite without hurting and only just beginning to flex their independence.

After seeing 8 & 10 week old kittens and how much they rely on their mums I have no idea how someone could believe they are ready to go to a scary new place all on their own.
 

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I volunteer at a rescue centre and we have a policy that kittens must have their first vacc before they leave mum, so approx 9 weeks but I know breeders like to keep them for at least 3 months (after 2nd vacc?). I have found that kittens often become more spiteful the younger they leave mum as they don't have mum or siblings to put them in their place.
 

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Those last few weeks really do make all the difference to the kittens social skills - many years ago I though tit was all guff and then I got our Birman and I was overwhelmed with how amazing she was, and I'm convinced it was the extra time she had with the breeder, mum and siblings.

Yes 6 week olds are eating and using the litter tray but that isn't what life is all about - I'm actually amazed now that puppies aren't kept longer.
 

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I second everyone else, the difference between Phoenix who came at 12 weeks & my other cats is truly amazing. I know it's partly the lovely Siamese character, but she is literally bomb proof & takes everything in her stride:)
 

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Those last few weeks really do make all the difference to the kittens social skills - many years ago I though tit was all guff and then I got our Birman and I was overwhelmed with how amazing she was, and I'm convinced it was the extra time she had with the breeder, mum and siblings.

Yes 6 week olds are eating and using the litter tray but that isn't what life is all about - I'm actually amazed now that puppies aren't kept longer.
It's because of their optimum socialisation period, which in dogs is between 8 & 16 weeks, though I believe toy breeders keep their pups a month longer. Dogs need to be exposed to as many different stimuli as possible so they're less likely to develop fear issues:) I have an under socialised rescue dog, he's got so many issues & I can't take him in built up areas as he's so upset by the noise & traffic:(
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
:eek: It makes me feel awful, both my cats arrived at 8 wks. I wouldn't get kittens so young again though. Luckily they are both happy and contented cats now.
 
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