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What does "control" mean to you?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by O2.0, May 3, 2021 at 1:59 PM.


  1. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I thought this would be an interesting discussion :)
    As the title really.
    We see it a lot, dog not under control, owners not controlling their dogs, out of control dogs...

    So what does it mean to you when your dog is under control?
    Do you feel like you have good control over your dog?
    Under what circumstances might your dog be out of control?
     
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  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    That's an interesting question. I think if I wanted a dog to be under control all the time, I'd just have bought a robotic dog. I think it is important for independence and freedom of choice that the dog gets to do his own thing sometimes; off lead and free to sniff, set his own pace, run about etc.

    But, the crucial point for me is that when I need to have control and ask him to recall, or to stay close, or to leave something, I'd rather like him to comply. Which, to be fair, he does most of the time - certainly enough for me to be happy with.
     
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  3. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Ha ha what a question.

    Do I feel I have good control of my dogs?

    Yes despite the fact loki can be a massive douche the tools I use I.e. harness and front clip when need means I feel in control I have never come close to dropping the lead or being pulled over. I am aware of my surroundings do not look at my phone when I’m with him and feel I manage situations well.

    Sox has very good recall again I’m aware of my surroundings. And manage interactions. Of course things can and do go wrong dogs are not robots and equipment can fail.

    What do I consider out of control ? If you cannot recall your dog they should not be off the lead I don’t care if they are friendly. Of course dogs do blow recall but some don’t teach it just hope for the best.

    On lead - I met a huge GS in the woods whilst running on a collar and lead started growling and lunging and pulled the owner over in the end I had to re route that dog was not in control. I’ve had a large boxer sit on loki as a puppy after it’s string (yes string) lead broke.

    Luckily around here I am the numpty most people have excellent control dog off leash see another into a down or sit.
     
  4. winnie73

    winnie73 PetForums Junior

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    under control. safe from hurting himself or others.

    yes. with only as much trust i have in the lead/collar/harness. no. if its an external force i have no control over, (other dogs i have no control over invading our space.)

    if equipment fails lead/collar/harness. or if unable to remove my dog from a harmful situation. (dog enters my control space and i can't control my dogs reaction towards it due to poor communication and direction between me and my dog towards the invading control space dog.
     
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  5. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    I agree you want a dog to be having fun just to be able to get them back if you need to.
     
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  6. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Generally we have control over Isla most of the time. She’s more inclined to want to be with us then run off anywhere which helps enormously. However we do have to be aware of certain things.
    Anything she finds that might be edible has to be consumed which apart from being flipping annoying worries me sometimes in case it upsets her stomach or even worse, is poisonous.
    Wildlife that she might chase, we can call her off deer, but not rabbits and squirrels, farm animals, just can’t take the risk that she might take it into her head to chase.
    People approaching, usually she’s not that bothered, but she can sometimes decide she knows some random person and may approach them in a friendly way, but not everyone likes dogs, so we watch her body language. I’m also careful if children are about in case they either run about excitedly which excites her or are over friendly or plain terrified. Usually she goes on the lead or is taken off the path just to be on the safe side.
    Then there’s other dogs. If the approaching dogs on a lead, then Isla goes on the lead. It’s worth looking at the owner of the approaching dog, if they suddenly start looking frantically for their dog and calling it in a bit of a panic, Isla goes on the lead. Otherwise I’m pretty relaxed with her meeting and greeting which is normally all she wants to do. Sometimes she meets a dog who is up for a play and she’s more then happy for this, but the moment we move off she’s with us. It really is handy to have a dog whose strong desire to be with you overrules most other things.

    So yes we have a lot of control over her when offlead, but with a number of caveats.
     
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  7. kirksandallchins

    kirksandallchins PetForums VIP

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    I don't think any dog can be trusted to do 100% recall or anything else. They have off days, grumpy days and days when something disgusting to roll in is a nicer option than galloping towards the owner when they are shouted. All people can't be relied on to be perfect every day, if only they were
     
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  8. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    For me a dog should be under control any time they are out in a public area, uk law also dictates that :Mooning
    That doesn't mean that the dog needs to be robotic (they are sentient beings capable of bad choices after all), it doesn't necessarily mean the dog needs to be leashed all the time or that they need to be at the owners side at all times either - what it does mean is that when you step out into a public place it is your (general you of course) responsibility to make sure you follow all leash laws (no matter how much off leash control the owner thinks they may have) and the dog does not damage, harm, intimidate or be allowed to be a pain in the arse for others sharing that space...respecting that not everyone wants their fluffikins barrelling up to them or their dog minding their own business.
    Dogs can still be dogs and be under control at all times in a public setting IMO.

    I've had a few blown recalls over the years...when Thai chased a deer and I splat face first with him running full pelt into the distance was a time that he was out of control...he didn't harm the deer, but I certainly had no say in what he was doing so I had lost control.
    Accidents happen, we all drop the ball on the odd occasion and as I said dogs are capable of making their own choices.
     
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  9. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    Definitely interesting question!

    What I see mostly that I would consider out of control is dogs basically not listening to their owners when recalled and being a general nuisance. Running up to other dogs on lead or when asked not to, chasing me when I’m on the horse etc (Yesterday I had to charge a dog twice to get it to stop running at my horses back legs). I think a lot of people (not on PF just general public) wouldn’t consider that as out of control but I do.

    Though I agree dogs are animals and have their own brains but that’s not an excuse to let them run riot.

    Would I say I have control over Ted? Yes most of the time! :Hilarious That doesn’t mean he’s amazingly trained and he certainly doesn’t have the best recall but, like @Boxer123 , I manage our situations. He’s onlead or longline if I don’t think he’s tuned in enough to me to be offlead or if we’re in the woods as hell go chasing. He’s offlead in certain areas where I know he’s good but if another dog comes along he is back on as I don’t think he will recall away. He does get to roam and sniff and play with his doggy friends but I do expect him to listen if he’s offlead! I guess I only let him off in easy situations so he doesn’t get much chance to be out of control?

    Has he ever been out of control? Yes, a few times. Nothing I’m proud of but he has bogged off after squirrels (this is very rare nowadays!!) and he did once bog off on a beach, I have no idea why, I assume it must have been a scent because he ran and ran in a straight line and then spun around and came back but he was not listening one bit!

    I am always very aware that Teddy could easily be one of those dogs - running around chasing things, running up to other dogs and being a nuisance. He has a super independent side to him and I try and be careful to manage him that he doesn’t get to practice any of those things! I’d hate for him to be a nuisance to someone.
     
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  10. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Sox once provided me with a Fenton moment when loki was a baby and took off after a deer. I managed to grab loki but he somehow twisted around so my finger got stuck in his harness all I could do was blow my whistle as Sox disappeared and I couldn’t move. Finally I wrenched my finger free and Sox reappeared looking worried over the horizon.

    That day I had no control.
     
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  11. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    When I had collies they were what I would call under control. They came instantly when called, they went instantly into a down if told and stayed there till released. They ignored other dogs and if a dog was being a nuisance I told them down and they stayed there till the other dog got bored and went away or was retrieved by its owner. I have not trained the poodles to that extent and Toffee will approach other dogs and people if I am not paying attention. The only problem is 9 out of 10 people call her to them and make a fuss of her. With rabbits I have no control whatsoever so she is on the flexi lead if I think rabbits are around.
     
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  12. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Interesting answers!

    I'm not sure where I fall.
    Penny still takes off after things. She's not at the point that I can recall her off a good chase, she chases until she realizes she's not going to catch it, and then comes back. So you could say she recalls, eventually, but not whiplash turn off a chase like she does in other contexts. (I can call her off the cats for example.)
    Like @Siskin though, just because I can't call her off - yet ;) doesn't mean I think she's out of control. If need be she's leashed or she's in areas where a short chase isn't going to endanger her or others. In the meantime, I work on improving her recall.

    Meanwhile Bates is either going deaf or senile because he has taken to totally ignoring me at times and then he looks at me like "oh hi there!"
    Other times he just says "no" like for the last potty break of the evening and he's comfortable in bed, he will pretend he doesn't hear me because he doesn't want to get up, then he barks at me annoyed, then I have to give him treats, then he finally concedes that maybe he probably should pee one more time, I get him out and he's fine.
    If I were struggling that much to get a younger dog out of bed for a quick wee I would say something was seriously wrong, but with Bates I just chalk it up to grumpy old man stuff.

    Then there's other stuff I just flat don't care so I don't address it.
     
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  13. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Well I'd like to say my dogs are well mannered and under control when they need to be in most situations. Sadly that's not the case with Shimmer and actually over the past 12 months, when they really haven't had much contact with humans or other dogs, they've all become a bit feral.
     
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  14. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    I think the trouble with the UK and dogs chasing is your never to far from a road which is the worry.
     
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  15. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    I agree, I don’t feel Isla is out of control if she belts off after a rabbit and I’m not overly worried about it apart from if it’s in a dangerous situation, but then she would be more likely be on a lead if near roads. It’s pointless trying to get her back mid chase as it’s such fun for her. She’s never caught anything apart from trapping a pheasant at a fence and dispatching it. Once the furry is up a tree or down a hole then she recalls well having had her fun. What I don’t do it allow it to become habitual. So if we’ve come across a rabbity area on a walk she leashed up as soon as we realise or after she’s chased something.
     
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  16. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    I do agree, I think if a dog goes after a chase and comes back I wouldn’t say that’s out of control. The whippets do this and some of the dogs I walk but they don’t go too far and don’t bother others. Though the whippets have hurt themselves before running through brambles! Why I class Ted as out of control is that he has no desire to come back. The very few times he’s been off in the woods (or I’ve been a bit slack and he’s pulled the line out my hands) he’s chased a squirrel but not come back. He’ll run to find another squirrel, or run because he thinks it’s gone further. He’s not interested in me at all! Though when he’s on a longline he is pretty focused now he just loses his head when he gets a chase on
     
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  17. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like someone I know.
     
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  18. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    Wonder who that could be :Hilarious
     
  19. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    Good question. I feel I have reasonable control over my dogs , though in the woods they've shot of after a squirrel before I can react . Libby barks at other dogs sometimes depending on the circumstances ie a big dog suddenly appears round a corner . I can trust them in new places off lead though I wouldnt risk woods/forests say when we're on holiday.
     
  20. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Sox I can normally call off a chase because he’s lazy (apart from above incident) Loki it’s like I am not there. He bogged off once and the only thing that broke the spell was him spotting Sox and coming back to get him.
     
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