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What are the reasons for homeschooling?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by merlin12, Sep 8, 2013.


  1. merlin12

    merlin12 PetForums VIP

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    Here in Spain people have to take their kids to school but I know it´s legal in other countries to teach them at home but what are the advantages? Doesn´t it make them less prepared to be part of the society as they will have less social skills as the don´t mix with other kids? Also, who controls what they are being thought and if it is lacking?
     
  2. Spirited

    Spirited Banned

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    Well officially its supposed to be because of violence in school and because the educational system is a joke. Personally I think its becuz the kids are probably not able to handle people or have phobias. Or the parents are just control freaks. Or maybe the kids have homicidal tendencies.
    just guesses on my part. :D
     
  3. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    There's lots of reasons that parents choose to homeschool. Some may not like the schools in their area, some may have experienced bullying, some may have children that have behavioural or educational needs that they feel they can better deal with in a home situation, some may feel that teaching their child 1-1 is more valuable than having 1 teacher in a class of 30 kids where the children get very little individual attention.

    There's plenty of homeschool groups where kids get together with other homeschoolers for the social skills etc, as well as doing things outside of school such as sport or music.

    I don't know what it's like there, but here parents have to apply to homeschool and meet certain criteria. I'm not sure how it's monitored though.

    Personally, if done well, I think homeschooling can be incredibly beneficial for some children. However, there are many variables and sometimes it ISN'T done well. But then again, you could say the same thing about teachers in schools.
     
  4. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Where I live parents can choose to homeschool if they want to.

    My sister homeschooled because she doesn't like the way things are taught in school, she was doing something called unschooling with her oldest child from the age of 5.

    A lot of socialising was done with a group of other unschoolers.

    My nephew did go to a normal kindy, then was homeschooled for 4 years and is now in a Montesori type school.

    There are regulations to follow with home teaching, but I don't know how tightly things are monitored aside from an annual visit from the department of education.

    I don't, and won't have children so it's not something I'll deal with, but I do think the choice should be there. Have never met any adults who were homeschooled, I do think the style of learning my nephew had would make it hard for him to fit into a workplace since he's used to doing what he wants, when he wants and the real world doesn't work like that.
     
  5. dorrit

    dorrit PetForums VIP

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    This is an incredibly insulting and small minded viewpoint.

    Ok I'll admit to being a control freak but where the safety and welfare of my children were /are concered Im sorry but I dont feel that to be a negative.
    As a mother I felt it was my duty to be responsible for my child and not put him in a place where he was in danger of violence or abuse. School was the worst place for him.

    My son was home schooled after he endured two years of constant bullying from the age of 4 1/2 onwards. His tormentors left him with cuts, briuses, they stole lunch, his clothes ripped from his body as they dragged him around the playground by the hood of his coat or his trouser leg, his skin was scraped from his body on that occasion leaving him with grazing the length of his legs and he needed doctors treatment.
    He got a black eye his hair pulled out at the root and all of this in a 'good' school in a posher London suburb.
    The teachers shrugged said they would keep an eye on him, and failed him at every moment.

    Add to this the fact that he has dyslexia and ADHD which the school totally ignored and maybe the reasons for home schooling are not so strange . The only other primary school in our area was roman Catholic and wouldnt admit him. So I had very little choice.

    I decided to home school him and I had to explain my reasons and we had to attend sessions with a pyscologist to explain ourselves ! Never mind that the monsters at that school should have been seeing a shrink preferably from a padded cell..

    From being unable to read or write I managed in 1 year to get him up to normal standards for his age and by the time we left England he was at an above average standard in all subjects..

    As regards social interaction I think my son got more than enough but it was in a safe and supportive environment not with a bunch of ill mannered yobs whos parents seemed to think that school was a place to dump their problem child.
    Its not the people who homeschool their children who are the problem its the parents who think that their responsibilty ends at the schoolgates.
     
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  6. merlin12

    merlin12 PetForums VIP

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    I can´t believe a school let all that happen to your son and didn´t put a stop to it, that was so irresponsible of them to let a child suffer.
     
  7. ozrex

    ozrex PetForums VIP

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    Here, there's a difference between homeschooling and distance education.

    Distance education would be used when a child is living too remote to have access to a school or perhaps in Dorrit's situation. The child receives the same education as he/she would do at school but from a parent or tutor/governess. They have access to teachers via the internet.

    Homeschooling is generally provided by parents who cannot bear to separate from their children for whatever reason seems good to them. It is often very good at the primary level but appalling at secondary level because
    a) people cannot teach adequately, what they do not know. I could not, for example, teach my Younger Monster German nor my Older Monster Specialist Maths.
    b) the children's socialisation is too often very poor. They may well have mixed with siblings and other homeschooled children but society is FAR more diverse than that.
    c)unschooling was great when people lived in small villages and followed their parents' (or other known adults') roles but again, society is FAR more diverse than that today. Older Monster's friend wishes to be a diplomat but he's never met one or had the opportunity to be apprenticed to one. He's at Melbourne Uni having learned French, German and Mandarin at school. His mother speaks good German but no-one around him speaks the other two languages. Another friend is studying medicine, yes he knows some doctors but without his startlingly good marks at school he'd never get access to the degree.
    Suppose you are a postie but your child would be happiest as a neurologist??

    I think it is very selfish to deny a child the chance to learn to the best of their ability at a really good school with a big range of subjects. The child might want to be something I've never heard of, never mind study subjects that I could not teach.

    I might add that although I've never taught at school I have a Diploma in Adult Education, a Bachelor's degree in Education and a Master's Degree in Educational Studies. I freely acknowledge that I could NEVER have educated my sons in all the subjects that THEY have chosen (and excelled in) and I'm too smart to try.
     
  8. hippymama

    hippymama PetForums Senior

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    each family will have their own reasons for choosing to home educate , for me i like spending time with my children i enjoy having them around , me and my partner hated school and were bullied etc , my eldest is 5 and that seems to me far to young to be separating him form his family and his home for most of the day and to be left with a bunch of strangers .... the only people who are allowed to look after my children are the people i and they know and trust , we've only ever left them with my mother :eek:

    my two enjoy learning so much and i would hate for them to lose that , they have so many interests , my son can navigate computer games , he is teaching himself to read , he is always telling me some interesting fact about some random sea creature that i didn't even know existed :p we go to groups and he plays with kids of all ages they are both so friendly , i am certainly not worried about them being 'socialised' lol
     
  9. hippymama

    hippymama PetForums Senior

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    i am so sorry your son had to go through that :(


    i totally agree with your last sentence
     
  10. Jonescat

    Jonescat Don't do nothing. Do something.

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    In my experience, a large group of people do it because their children have special needs that the education system can't meet in the timescales they need. Often they have to fight for years to get appropriate education for their child and are left with no option in the meantime. It is a disgrace.

    Another group don't share the same values as the available schools and so keep them at home as a positive thing. Often those people team up with each other to support the children over the whole curriculum.

    It is regulated and you are monitored to ensure that you are not doing it hide abuse. That side is a bit hit-and-miss, and you aren't usually monitored for educational achievement unless you LEA can afford it and has an interest in it.

    The socialisation available in schools is not necessarily ideal, and not every child comes out of school as a completely rounded individual able to talk confidently to anyone in society, so it seems unfair to chuck that at the home-schoolers. I think you need to have the option for all those famillies that can not make school work for them. It is a completely different group to those who are school-refusers and whose parents have no interest in education.
     
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  11. hippymama

    hippymama PetForums Senior

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    just wanted to answer the last bit , legally all parents are responsible for their childs education whether through sending them to school or otherwise (which is where home education fits ) so the parents decide how the child is educated , they have no obligation to follow the national curriculum and the local authority has no legal obligation to check up on them (though some will tell you otherwise ) unless there is concern that the children are not being 'educated' if there is concerns over child welfare that is a case for social services and is separate from the education issue

    we don't follow any kind of curriculum we follow the kids interests which is known as autonomous learning , so far this year we have learned about countless topics , such as medieval Britain , sea creatures , the big bang , space , dinosaurs , star wars :p , the human body , evolution , pond life , fossils etc . through learning about these we have visited museums , gone pone dipping , been to science centers , castles etc , visited our local library , and used various websites
     
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  12. smiler84

    smiler84 PetForums VIP

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    When I was in sixth form a girl who had been homeschooled joined us. She'd done really well in her gcses, had normal social skills and had a very good relationship with her mum who had taught her. The only area that she really struggled in was having to stick to the structure and routine of school, and having to fit in with other people's timescales. I haven't kept in touch since uni, but I cant help thinking she'd find your average workplace very restrictive...
     
  13. Waterlily

    Waterlily Amused

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    Loads of people that went to school cant be arsed working, that will have nothing to do with how she reacts to a job.
     
  14. ForestWomble

    ForestWomble PetForums VIP

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    I have had some of my childhood in a school and some I was home schooled.

    The pros of homeschooling are that you can learn better and a wider amount then at school (because my english tutor had a love of poems I was forced to learn a lot of poems (not my cup of tea tbh)) and I got to learn things I enjoyed that I never got to learn at school (sewing, animal care (due to our pets at home (and the vet saw I was interested so used to tell me stuff), baking, and I got to focus on languages, sciences, art, music, history and geography and finally I was given the help I needed with spelling and maths (both of which school never was able to teach me).
    If there is something you are keen in you can focus more on that and for stuff you aren't so interested in you have to still do some work but just focus on what you need in the real world and not stuff you wouldn't need in a million years unless you do a job were that is needed.

    The negatives I guess would be that, unless you go to clubs in the evenings and weekends you might not be that good at socializing, however, for me school mucked that up big time anyway. Also it might be harder to deal with college, uni, job because you are not used to a more structured day, things are more carefree in a home school environment.

    However saying that everyone is different, some people might spend their whole school lives in school and be terrible at work, but someone who was home schooled might be perfect at work. You never know.
     
  15. SarahBee

    SarahBee PetForums Member

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    We had a girl arrive at our Sixth form who had been home schooled because she was a brilliant, brilliant violinist.

    I think a 'normal' school just couldn't cater for the hours of violin she was doing a day. She was playing in front of the royal family at the age of about 7 so was home schooled between the age of 8 and 16 so she could focus her time.

    She obviously had no issues with structure or routine as she practiced for about 8 hours a day! She was a really lovely, normal girl.
     
  16. Indiandpuppy

    Indiandpuppy PetForums VIP

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    WOW! I am home educated so could have taken much offence here! I was bullied and bitched by the girls all through juniors in primary school and changed primary twice then in the 2nd year of high school it started getting to the stage where I was beat up on the bus and came home attacked by all the boys with cuts and bruises so I decided not to go back in yr9 and my mum looked into home education. I am not a social reject. I am the deputy youth mp for my area voted by all the local schools including my old school where I have gone back and done speeches, I have been a background artist on tv and go to drama class, I to dog training. I am a member of the youth cabinet planning committee and youth parliament. I have done my duke of Edinburgh award, and volunteered at 3 carehomes and 1 animal sanctuary, I am also a cyber mentor for beat bullying and did work experience at a school and my bronze arts award teaching drama classes, I have also done a crest science award and am running for Junior Miss Bury (miss world organisers) I go to a church youth club and I go to a home educators meet up once a month as well as all the home educators workshops and trips some organised by me and my mum are..

    series of 3 day long biology classes at manchester university/natural history museum- on six form level / a level

    3 workshops at Mosi/ chemistry classes

    1 art workshop at the art museum

    1 dance and drama workshop

    5 art/ english lit classes in john rylands university library

    1 social trip to lazer quest

    2 spanish exchanges

    1 trip to the fusilier museum

    1 trip to the roman experience in chester

    2 workshops in the imperial war museum

    1 trip to the tate gallery

    and ones I have attended organised by other in the home educators network

    1 trip ice skating

    7 hour long circus skills classes

    4 2hr horse riding lesson/ stable management award sessions

    2 cooking workshops at pizza express

    1 at toby carvery and 1 at yosushi

    1 full day trip to the jewish museum with 3 classes

    trip to a recycled fashion show

    20 mixed sport/ pe classes at the stadium (2 hrs each)


    I am doing my english lit and history gcses this january then RE, biology, math and english language in june :) I am 16 in january.


    so yeah....
     
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  17. Spirited

    Spirited Banned

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    :eek:
    Lighten up.
    It wasnt meant as a serious stop the presses post.
    I try to put a bit of humor in things. I dont really have a problem with homeschooling and Im sorry your kid was abused. If it suited your situation, good for you. But, you need to get a thicker skin if a light hearted post is going to "incredibly" insult you. ;)
     
  18. Spirited

    Spirited Banned

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    Well thankfully my post didnt offend you. :)
     
  19. GoldenShadow

    GoldenShadow PetForums VIP

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    I have only known one group of children homeschooled and to be honest that demonstrated quite clearly how wrong people can get it. I don't disagree with the concept at all but these kids highlighted a lot of what seem to be the key problems.

    It would be something I would be loathed to do but I can completely understand why some would do it. It seems a lot of kids are homeschooled after initially going to school, the kids I know were homeschooled from the off, their mother was a biology teacher before she had them. They are very alien to the vast majority and I do wonder how they will cope when they no longer have their parents. They don't have friends etc, it is simply family.
     
  20. GoldenShadow

    GoldenShadow PetForums VIP

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    So you have been homeschooled for three years, ish? That's not much homeschooling tbh, most of your learning has come via mainstream school and so I don't think you are overly comparable as a true homeschool school student in any pro or con list. Don't take any of these posts personally because they are largely related to the extremes and not the norms within each area.
     
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