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Washing paws and wellies after a walk in the woods

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by amandab, Nov 3, 2012.


  1. amandab

    amandab PetForums Newbie

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    We are being advised to wash our dogs' paws, and our footwear after walking in woods to help preserve the ash trees. Are you doing this and are you adding anything to the water? The disease is a fungus, so should we be looking at adding a fungicide? If so, what would be safe for our dogs?
     
  2. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    I only read this today after getting back from my walk in the woods :eek:

    BBC News - Ash dieback: 'Wash after visiting woods' plea

    Although I'm confused as to how washing boots and paws will help :confused: The fungus has air bourne spores, so surely it'll be all over your clothes and dogs fur.

    To me it's all too little to late - Ash in Europe has had this problem for some considerable time :( and we only decided to ban the import of Ash form Europe a few days ago :mad:
     
  3. Nicki85

    Nicki85 PetForums VIP

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    Just read the article in the telegraph about this... I really don't think disinfecting your boots/ dog is going to stop the spread of this fungus. What about birds flying tree to tree? Deer running forest to forest? It is going to spread... I can't see a way to stop it.

    IMO Government are trying to show that they are trying to stop it as in reality there is not much they can do now. They should have had more stringent controls in the first place on the importation of ash- we live on an island!

    Sorry, not very helpful but I don't think washing/ using a fungicide/ disinfecting your feet/ dogs is going to help.
     
  4. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    And why were we ever importing ash in the first place? It grows like mustard and cress on all the woodland floors round here.

    I'm a volunteer for Natural England. They are talking about instituting a policy of wheel washing for staff vehicles entering/leaving their nature reserves - but not asking or expecting visitors to do the same. What's the point? The deer and birds will spread it anyway.
     
  5. amandab

    amandab PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for all your responses. You have confirmed my suspicions that the advice is a bit OTT, it may well be a politician 'taking action' (dangerous dogs, foot and mouth). I think the spread of the disease is inevitable but might not as horrible as Dutch Elm. I would hate to think the spread the disease might be blamed on dogs and their owners.

    I have talked to conservationist and green neighbours and they seem to doubt the efficacy of the precautionary measures. It is airborn and fungal, and other wildlife could spread the disease. Why we have been importing Ashes is a puzzle.

    I think, if you walk in the same woods, there is less danger. If you walk in more than one woody place, it might be worth taking precautions, when you go to a different location. I still don't know if you should wash with plain water or add to the solution.
     
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