Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Wanstead Park - Dogs To Watch Out For

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by ManAndHisDog, Nov 24, 2019.


  1. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi all,

    Thought I would start a thread about this as we go to Wanstead Park, next to the golf club, regularly and want it to be a safe place for all dogs and families.

    We’ve heard from other owners about their dogs being attacked, some people put A4 print outs on a tree next to the gate to warn other dog owners.

    ManAndHisDog were out for their regular Sunday walk when 3 people and 3 dogs approached - perfectly normal. HisDog was busy eating a stick when 2 of the other dogs came to say Hi and have a bum-sniff, again no problemo. Out of nowhere this Brown and white Boston Terrier grabs HisDog by the throat and HisDog can’t do anything as he was pinned on all sides. I went in and lifted HisDog by the harness and asked the woman to get her dog on the lead. She couldn’t be bothered and claimed it was all my fault. Her 2 friends and their dogs were a bit shocked.

    Forward to today and we’re out again for a walk. From up ahead, about 20-30 metres, we see the woman and her Boston Terrier so we go to get the lead on HisDog. Before I could blink the Boston Terrier was at HisDog, and without stopping to check each other out it went for HisDog’s throat again.

    Luckily HisDog wasn’t outnumbered this time and managed to hold his own until ManAnd arrived to airlift him out of danger.

    This time I reminded the woman that this was the second time her dog had done this and she needs to be in control of her animal. Blasé as, she says “Your dog attacked mine.” The man who was with her looked shocked and I think he realised their dog did the attacking. I was fuming as this could quite easily have been a child and not my dog (although it was bad enough being my dog).

    I told her that if I see her dog off the lead in the park again I’ll have to inform the police that she’s putting other people’s dogs and possibly children at risk.

    If you do have a similar incident please share it on here, and, if you can post pictures of the attacking dog and their owner we can all try to have a safe and enjoyable walk!
     
  2. bumbarrel

    bumbarrel PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2017
    Messages:
    420
    Likes Received:
    603
    You should report to local dog warden.
     
    Torin., Calvine, margy and 7 others like this.
  3. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    6,048
    Likes Received:
    17,557
    How would that be helpful at all?
    Why don't you just report these incidents to your local dog warden? You can clearly identify the dog and the woman, just report it.
     
    Torin., margy, Rott lover and 7 others like this.
  4. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi,

    As a dog owner the people posting notices about problem dogs is useful as you can be pre-warned about problem animals and their owners. I do check forums before going to new places with HisDog, just to be prepared.

    I am reporting it to the local police so they have it logged incase it happens again.

    I should have taken a photo but I didn’t, my hand was a bit cut up and I was looking for a tissue. Incidentally, I couldn’t find what dog wardens do other than deal with stray dogs, I’ve certainly never seen them around ‘patrolling’ parks.
     
  5. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2013
    Messages:
    14,783
    Likes Received:
    22,372
    Well dog wardens do more than pick up strays and can be just as helpful as police. They often work in conjunction with the police, but instead of coming here giving your side of the story maybe listen to what people say and be more proactive than naming and shaming on social media
     
  6. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Very helpful, thank you. I did say that I am contacting the local authorities and I also said that I couldn’t find (meaning I did do some googling) what dog wardens did. Admittedly, I didn’t do loads of extensive research on dog wardens but I’ll take your advice and contact them too.

    I don’t see anything wrong with sharing information on the internet, especially on a dog forum. Naming and shaming isn’t what I’m doing since I don’t have the woman’s name or photo. But if I did I would. I believe people should take responsibility and accountability. These are my own views, I don’t expect everyone to agree with them.
     
  7. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Also, my apologies if you felt I insinuated dog wardens don’t do anything. I just wasn’t aware of what their duties were and didn’t intend to poo poo them
     
    Calvine likes this.
  8. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    23,387
    Likes Received:
    34,005
    It’s good you’re reporting this to the Police. Under Dog Law they should do something about it.

    Our area has a chap in the Environmental Health department at the Council designated as Dog Warden who will deal with stray dogs etc.

    However, he wasn’t interested when I reported the owner of the loose dog that attacked mine while he was on lead and minding his own business.

    The Police were brilliant and tracked the owner down using the info I gave them and issued a 12 month Public Order Notice (? something like that).

    So well worth reporting and pursuing ime.

    I did also tell all the other dog owners to beware of the dog and report it too if they had issues.
     
    Calvine, LinznMilly and ManAndHisDog like this.
  9. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Thanks for sharing LurcherLad
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  10. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    13,326
    Likes Received:
    5,172
    That may be true in your area but here you cannot speak to the dog warden directly and I was told in no uncertain terms that due to council budget cuts they only have time to deal with stray dogs. Obviously different rules depending on your location it would seem.
     
  11. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    17,803
    Likes Received:
    13,524
    There were 2 dog related cases in court in my area this week. One was a young dog that had not had suitable veterinary care which was removed and the owner was banned from keeping more than one pet (her older dog) for 5 years. The other was a collie that snapped at someone on a walk. So some areas do take it very seriously. There have been appeals from the police in the past after dog on dog attacks.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  12. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    6,048
    Likes Received:
    17,557
    I'm not a huge fan of the social media naming and shaming thing TBH. Posting a photo of a dog and labeling said dog as dangerous is a) just one person's word/opinion, and b) these things tend to get ugly quickly on social media.

    It the dog's behavior was problematic enough to warrant warning others, it's problematic enough to warrant reporting. And at least with a report you have an official paper trail, I doubt the same weight would be given to a FB post.

    Just my opinion, but this is yet again one of those things that could be mostly avoided by simply not allowing your dog to interact with strange dogs. Dogs coming up to each other to 'say hi' is not really a thing. I don't know where/when this became a thing but it's not really friendly behavior for one dog to approach another dog they don't know, it's actually rude, and if at all possible, I block other dogs from doing this to my dogs. This might be one way to avoid future altercations?
     
    NFC slave, adamantis, Rafa and 3 others like this.
  13. ManAndHisDog

    ManAndHisDog PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi O2.0

    Thanks for your post mate. I completely agree. It can be very unfair on a dog if it’s labelled ‘dangerous’ based on a single incident if it’s not clear cut around the circumstances.

    I’m not entirely sure I understand the ‘saying hi isn’t a thing, thing’ do you mean dogs just approaching each other and sniffing? I’d have a stressful time keeping every dog away on a walk in London. HisDog never seems to bother with other dogs. He sees them but just walks on, doesn’t actively avoid them though. I’ve always thought that odd from a pack animal.
     
  14. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    6,048
    Likes Received:
    17,557
    Is your dog's name "HIsDog"?
    If he sees other dogs and walks on, that's great and I would definitely keep encouraging this behavior. I would guess he's giving off "I don't want to interact" signals, some dogs will respect that, but a lot of dogs don't. In this case it's your job to keep those dogs away. You don't have to be OTT about it, sometimes something as simple as just putting your dog on the other side of you or behind you and shooing the dog away. No, it's not 'normal' for random dogs to walk up to each other and sniff any more than it would be normal for you to walk up to a random stranger and shake his hand. In a social context where you're intending to meet, sure, but just walking down the street passing someone, you wouldn't reach out to shake hands, or worse, grab the person's hand and shake it.
    It's no different with dogs. Most dogs are placid enough and tolerate the weird/rude behavior benevolently, but I'm sure you can imagine the range of human reactions to a random stranger grabbing your hand and shaking it, dog would react in a wide range of behaviors too. To me, best to just avoid the whole thing, and when you see a dog coming in for an interaction, just urge them away.
     
    Torin., adamantis, margy and 2 others like this.
  15. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    17,803
    Likes Received:
    13,524
    I would say a dog sniffing at another dog is completely normal, more like us saying hello to someone we pass on a walk - which everyone does where I live.
     
  16. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    6,048
    Likes Received:
    17,557
    Perhaps for some dogs, especially those kept in very social environments like a lot of pets these days, perhaps. But I would argue that while it does happen on a regular basis, I don't know that it is 'normal' dog behavior.
    What I mean is, if you observe domestic dogs gone feral, or even back in the day when there were latchkey dogs who wandered about all day in the neighborhood. These dogs don't approach dogs they don't know and sniff each other up and down. Generally feral dogs acknowledge each other, but other than that, don't really interact at all. Unless there is competition of some sort over a resource, and even then the communication is about preventing conflict.

    Sniffing is more of a greeting behavior with dogs who already know each other. Or it is a mutually agreed upon next step when two dogs are becoming friendly.
    But the mutually agreed upon part is so often missed by overly socialized dogs and their owners. There is a lot of body language that happens (or should happen) before the sniff where dogs communicate to each other that they're okay with continuing the interaction.

    It's like getting on a bus and sitting next to someone. You might say "good morning" and then if the other person nods or grunts something but then looks out the window you know to leave it alone. But maybe the other person says good morning back and comments on the lovely weather we've been having. If you're in the mood you'll continue the conversation, if you're not, you'll grunt and busy yourself doing something else to indicate you're not interested in pursuing the interaction.

    Dogs do this too. They'll look away, pretend to notice something else, go sniff a clump of grass. Or they engage the other dog and then sniff and then interact together.

    But I see way too many dogs approach other dogs and without any preamble shove their nose up the dog's bum, or shove their face in the dog's face. I've been walking down the sidewalk, another dog coming the other direction, Bates clearly ignoring the other dog, and as they pass the other dog shoves his nose up Bates' tail. Then Bates does the doggy version of "excuse me, do you MIND!!??" Every once in a while the owner will apologize for their dog's behavior, but far more often it's some version of "what's wrong with your dog? Mine was just being friendly!"

    It's really too bad that so many people are confused about friendly, appropriate dog interactions. And dogs who react to rudeness punished instead of supported, and dogs who behave rudely not corrected for it.
     
  17. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Messages:
    13,596
    Likes Received:
    21,530
    That’s very interesting and a good way of putting it

    Isla is generally keen to meet and greet other dogs. Her usual MO is to sniff noses with the other dog and if they are both happy with that (saying hello and passing the time of day) both dogs usually sniff further along the body in the usually manner.

    She’s fairly good at reading other dogs and on a couple of occasions she’s started to approach a dog then stopped dead and turned away, I guess something has bothered her about the dog and she’s not even going to risk a hello.
    One time we were out in some woodland and a large muzzled off lead dog started coming towards us from another direction. I called Isla and she stopped dead, took one look and scuttled back to us. Mr S wanted to put Isla on the lead but I said she was better loose so she get away if the dog decided to attack. The owner (panicking a bit) asked if we had a male or female and was relieved to hear of Isla’s sex. Just as well really, goodness knows what could have happened if we had a male dog.
     
    Lurcherlad and O2.0 like this.
  18. Alexliu

    Alexliu PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    I think you should just call the police, because they've done this many times. This behavior is a serious threat to the safety of other dogs.
     
  19. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    17,803
    Likes Received:
    13,524
    Toffee is a bit like this. She is a pain in getting over excited with other dogs but sometimes she will not go near a dog at all, particularly large dogs or dogs that have a ball or stick in their mouth. We met an absolutely ginormous mastiff a few weeks ago on a very narrow path. Candy greeted it and because it was only 8 months and giving off puppy vibes she did a lot of excited tail wagging but Toffee skulked out of the way. Toffee is seriously a pain around other dogs but it is just how she is. She is not 'oversocialised' , it is just her temperament though I sometimes wonder if it is because she was spayed before her first season. In the same way that some children are over friendly I suppose. It is hard to control because we often go weeks or months without meeting another dog then at the holiday cottage she is suddenly flooded with them and it takes a few days for her to calm down and accept them. Candy has a different temperament so, though she will often walk up to another dog on a path and sniff noses with it she does not get at all excited over it. Thinking back to previous dogs when I lived in a town - it was relatively rare to meet another dog as less people walked them and mine certainly showed no interest in them but there were still loony dogs that bounded around out of control and I just used to drop my dogs and tell them to stay till the owner retrieved their dog. They had no interest in meeting other dogs but maybe they were the exception. Lack of training and dogs that have to be on the lead all the time are my bugbears.

    I really think we have to accept that, whether or not feral dogs behave like that, a lot of dogs (but not all) do like greeting other dogs and it is perfectly normal in the same way that some people are much more sociable than others and will greet and stop to chat whereas others have no interest in any interaction.
     
  20. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,684
    Likes Received:
    11,092
    Kite is the manners police with rude dogs, and gets my total support.
     
    O2.0 likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice