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Vet overnight stay - not happy

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by samikles, Aug 30, 2013.


  1. samikles

    samikles PetForums Junior

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    We took the 13-year-old cat we had to take in from the street 10 weeks' ago to the vets this morning for some dental work but we booked him some tests in beforehand with him being an older cat. These have so far shown an underactive thyroid and some kidney disease and consquently his dental work has been cancelled. They want a urine sample from him but have said they may have to wait until it's quiet for him to pee, and may have to resort to keeping him in overnight so they can get one.

    I'm really not too happy with keeping him in overnight just so they can obtain a urine sample. The last time the vet said they'd keep my cat in overnight she ended up having to be PTS and they wouldn't let us say goodbye to her so I'm obviously very anxious! Do you think it's a good idea they keep him in or am I quite within my rights to not be happy about the situation?
     
  2. Polly G

    Polly G PetForums VIP

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    My vet has often taken urine samples from Jasper and he doesn't have to stay overnight - it is normally quite a quick procedure. Jasper is 14 years old and has lots of problems, he is also very nervous, but taking a urine sample has never been a problem. On occasions they have used a very fine needle when they couldn't get him to pee, but that only took a few minutes.

    I understand your reservations about leaving your cat overnight and I know if I was in your shoes I would be nervous about it too.

    Please let me know how you get on. Good luck:)
     
  3. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    It is unusual for a cat to have underactive thyroid disease, particularly if it is co-morbid with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Are you sure the vet did not mean overactive thyroid?

    I assume the CKD has been diagnosed with a blood test?

    My vet always obtained urine samples from my old cat (RIP) who had CKD, by taking it directly from the bladder with a needle/syringe. It is quick and appears to be painless for the cat and gives a more accurate reading in terms of bacterial count than a sample obtained via a litter tray.

    Personally I think it is pointless (and expensive) keeping a cat in the surgery purely to get a urine sample:(. If the vet insists it has to be a sample from the tray, then s/he can give you (or sell you) a couple of packs of non-absorbent white beads to put on their own in a clean litter tray at home. Then you can pour off the urine into a little sample pot the vet should give you.

    But my vet would regard this is a clumsy old-fashioned method, now urine can be taken directly from the bladder. If it were me I would take advice from another vet tbh.

    I assume the vet wants to stabilise the thyroid and the kidneys before your cat has a gen.anaesthetic. As the cat has CKD he would need to be on I.V.fluids during and after the dental operation to support his kidneys.
     
  4. samikles

    samikles PetForums Junior

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    Hi There

    Thanks for the replies, I thought it sounded a bit odd and this has been confirmed by the responses. I've explained everything to my partner and if they haven't called by teatime with an update he's going to give them a call and ask if we can take him home and retrive a urine sample from him. By the sounds of it, other than diet modification and trying to increase fluid intake, there's not a lot more we can do in regards to treating CKD. I understand they'll want the urine sample to determine the stage he's at but TBH he's a very active cat, he eats well, he's gained weight since we've got him and he still has a sparkle in his eye so I'm guessing it won't be that advanced so then why feel the need to keep him overnight? It's just going to be stressing him out as well as me. I want him home!!

    p.s. It possibly is that he has an overactive thyroid. I'm at work so I couldn't really concentrate on what my partner was saying as much as I would have liked to.

    I'll keep you updated.
    Thanks for your advice.
    Sam
     
  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Hmm - vets are a bit like doctors and tend to run roughshod over us sometimes.

    If you don't want him to stay overnight - then I would TELL them you don't want him to stay and that you will be picking him up later. It's your decision at the end of the day.

    Vets also seem to love doing tests for everything. Many of them, it would seem, are overkill. When they ask if the animal is insured - I always wonder if that makes a difference?

    I would make sure that any tests they want to do are actually relevant and necessary. Also, make sure they give antibiotics because the bacteria released during a dental can cause major problems with the heart further along the line if they get into the bloodstream - as I found out to my cost a few years ago - which resulted in me losing one of my cats which could have been avoided if I had known :(
     
  6. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I would say you want to bring him home and ask if they could give you Katkor crystals which come with a pipette and pot so you can get a sample very easily yourself. The crystals go into the litter tray but don't absorb the liquid so you just squeeze it up into the pipette and transfer to the pot, its very simple. I understand your worry after your last experience, and I wouldn't be very happy with a vet who wouldn't let me say goodbye to my pet. Its your choice, so do what you think is best.
     
  7. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    My vet has always been able to retrieve a urine sample by giving the cat's bladder a well aimed squeeze and aiming the wee into a dish.
     
  8. samikles

    samikles PetForums Junior

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    They're letting us bring him home. My partner's just gone to collect him. I can't tell you how relieved I feel.

    I wonder what the damage will be £ wise. He's insured but as we didn't know his background I just wonder if the insurance company might null and void his cover. I'll cross that bridge when I come to it though.

    Thanks for the responses. Had they not gotten a urine sample I'd have demanded him back knowing fine well they didn't need to keep him in.

    It's definitely an underactive thyroid he has btw.
    x
     
  9. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    You do need to be on the ball when vets are suggesting an overnight stay. Unless they do their own OOH you can get stuck with 'transfer' fees and all sorts of sundry costs. Just because the cat is staying at their premises doesn't mean it's staying in their care these days. Always worth checking.
     
  10. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    Absolutely! Of course you're well within your rights-it's your cat after all. In addition the RCVS have very strict guidelines about vets obtaining owner's informed consent before going ahead with any type of treatment, procedure etc. In other words they need your permission on all levels. Furthermore I cannot understand why they feel it necessary to hospitalize a cat to obtain a urine sample when is something you could collect at home and drop into them.

    I have to say I was speechless when I read about your other cat. What were the circumstances here? They should never have prevented you from saying goodbye. It's simply outrageous and you would be well within your rights to report them for this. In fact I would urge to change vets because my alarm bells are ringing here and I really don't like the sound of these ones at all. I'd definitely look elsewhere. Now.
     
  11. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Ianthi!! It's great to see you back again:D We have missed you a lot!:)
    Hope all is well with you?:)
     
  12. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    Thanks CM. I'm fine. I've been away on holidays. :)
     
  13. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    I've only just seen this post. Unlike dogs, underactive thyroid is extremely rare in cats where cases are most commonly caused by overdosing of thyroid medications ie iatrogenic. The low thyroid reading is much more likely to be something called euthyroid sick syndrome which can happen with a concurrent illness. In other words the thyroid is functioning normally but owing to the above the readings are much (falsely) lower than they truly are. Frankly, I'm surprised at the vet here. Another reason to look elsewhere! :)
     
  14. samikles

    samikles PetForums Junior

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    Hi Ianthi

    The circumstances with my Sassy (RIP) was that we rushed her in one Sunday night last May as we noticed some abnormal neuropathic twitching in her face and eye. The vet wanted to keep her in to carry out some diagnostics and she ended up staying an agonising 3 nights. On the fourth day we received a telephone call from the vet stating she'd slipped into a coma and the tests had all being inconclusive. However, her platelets and haemoglobin were very low which was indicative of bone marrow cancer and the best thing to do would be to have her PTS. We were desperate to say our goodbyes but when we asked we were advised she was in a bad way and it would be too upsetting to see her. It's heartbreaking knowing that the last time I ever remember of her were her little paws poking out of her carrier. It's still very much raw to this day.

    Anyway, moving onto Todd, he's home but they didn't get an adequate enough sample from his urine to do a protein count. They want us to provide them with one so they can decide if he needs supplementing but does it really matter how he gets his intake? I'd sooner do this in the form of food than tablets to avoid unnecessary stress for Todd as he's been through too much these last few weeks. After his home was repossessed he was kicked out onto the street and lived rough for a full week before we reluctantly took him in. I say reluctantly because we have Sassy's 6-yr-old sister and she doesn't get on well with other cats. He has to live upstairs the majority of the time while we try and integrate them using black and white methods. I don't want to put him through any more than what's necessary. I don't think it's fair.
     
  15. JoeJ

    JoeJ PetForums Newbie

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    How's your boy today, samilkes?
     
  16. Alisonfoy

    Alisonfoy PetForums Senior

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    Sounds strange. A lot of vets don't have any staff in the premises overnight, so should something go wrong, there is no one to help your cat anyway.

    The only reason I've ever left one of my cats at the vet is because they are hooked up to a drip.

    When my parents' cat was tested for kidney disease last year we were given special non-absorbent litter so when she peed a sample could easily be collected. Minimal fuss.
     
  17. samikles

    samikles PetForums Junior

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    Hi JoeJ

    'My boy' caught sight of my girl last night then proceeded to chase her all the way up the stairs and onto the bathroom windowledge where she began cowering. We then prized him off her but afterwards he jumped up on the windowledge, sniffed it then sprayed all over it.

    So to answer your question he seems back to his normal self lol.



    We just need to get this protein sample done (joy). They gave us some absorbable litter so when I catch a min after work one night I'll pop some in his litter box and run down to the vets with it. If the protein sample's okay next month he can have his tooth op, but I'm slightly worried about him going in under GA now!
     
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