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Very old smelly cat

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Eliza-May, Mar 29, 2021.


  1. Eliza-May

    Eliza-May PetForums Newbie

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    I've got a cat that I've known for 20+ years who was an adult when I first saw him. His owners moved away when I first met him and many people on the estate look after him. He's got a dog kennel at the front of the house that he goes in and thankfully now my 2 dogs let him come in without fuss - unlike before. I've bought him the biggest litter tray I could find but he still has a lot of issues about poo on him. He gets diahearra a lot so it gets stuck in his fur. Sometimes he lets me clean him up but a lot of the time it's too bad too get it out properly so he is very smelly. I do as much as I can but won't clean him for to long as I don't want to stress him out , he'll only let me clean him some people he won5 even let them touch him.

    What's the best way I can clean him up without stressing him out. I hate the smell it's very potent and have bought incontinence pads for him to sit on so I can keep changing where he sits so it's nice and clean.
     

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  2. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    Wow. This is a really tricky one. I feel for you. If you hate the smell, he will hate it twice as much. Have you seen the sticky thread on house soiling? Just wondering why he gets diarrhoea. It would be much better if we could sort his tummy issues out. Diarrhoea means he is inflamed and that could be the result of an intolerance, an allergy or a lack of good gut flora. Have you investigated this? Is he well apart from this?
     
  3. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    He’s a beauty by the way. But 20 years is very old for a cat and even humans in late age become incontinent.
     
  4. Eliza-May

    Eliza-May PetForums Newbie

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    He still thinks he's a kitten and goes of wondering he's very good at jumping up on things quite agile. He's gone deaf but rrys to meow to hear himself I think it's so loud. I think he's got a bit of dementia he has a bit to eat gets distracted then asks for more, he's a happy boy though and purrs nearly as loud as he meow when he's having a fuss
     
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  5. Eliza-May

    Eliza-May PetForums Newbie

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    He is very old but still plays around like a kitten jumping up to have a fuss. He's a bit of a character and a lot of people visit him and fuss him when he's having a wonder
     
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  6. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    Ok. And the food? What does he eat?
     
  7. Treaclesmum

    Treaclesmum PetForums VIP

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    Bless him, I would get him a vet check to make sure his digestive system is okay otherwise.
     
  8. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    He sounds like a lovely happy boy who, thanks to you and your neighbors had been allowed to live his life in peace after being abandoned by his original family. You don't mention whether you have had him to the vet or what his diet is. At his age I probably wouldn't want to mess around with too much, but he could be made more comfortable by adding some probiotics to his diet to see if that will help the quality of his stool. It's possible he is seriously ill of course, the diarrhea does indicate inflammation in his bowel, as already mentioned, but if you don't intend to put him through a lot there is no point in putting him through the diagnostics.

    Remember that cats hide discomfort and even agonizing pain, it is instinctive in them. You might start by adding a probiotic, get one that contains s.boulardii, or add the s.boulardii separately. Start slowly and build up the dose. There might be some initial worsening of the problem, but I would stick with it.

    I cured Queen Eva's intestinal bacterial infection with massive doses of s.boulardii. It took 3 months. It's a slow process but it can be done. Ensure that he is getting enough water in his diet by feeding a wet diet.

    One more thing, has he been wormed regularly al these years? Since he's basically been an outdoor cat all his life, it's a given that he's been hunting and will be carrying a parasite load if he's not been wormed regularly.
     
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  9. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    After rereading your post I see I never answered your question. It sounds like he lets you handle him some, so I would simply just work on cleaning him for a few minutes at a time. Get a coupe small buckets of warm water. Sit by him while he's on a towel or one of his pads and dip the comb in the clean bucket and comb gently at the mess. dip the comb in the other bucket for cleaning it and removing the stuff, then dip it in the clean again and proceed. Tiny steps. When he indicates he's had enough stop and do it again in a little while.

    I also suggest you talk to him while you are doing it. Show him the buckets and the comb and tell him what they are for. Tel him, as you comb away the sticky mess how much better he will feel with all that gone. Assure him you're going to do everything you can to keep him clean and help his bowels, and that you will listen to him and he should tell you every time when he's had enough and you will stop, and things like that.

    Once you've got him at a level of cleanliness you both can live with, try to get to it as soon as he goes, so it doesn't cake and dry. You could suggest to him that he let you know when he's heading to the box for another poop so you can be ready to help him. You can show him you want to proceed that way by standing by and being ready after he finishes. He will soon learn the new routine.
     
  10. Jackie C

    Jackie C Cat slave

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    Aww, he sounds and looks like such a sweet boy, thank you for taking him in. x How long has he been in your home? If he's been in a while now and seems settled, it's probably worth taking him to the vet. He might have some underlying health issues which he might just need some mild help with, although he could have serious issues at his age. It's likely it's not worth putting him through too much at his age if it's anything bad, and just making sure he's comfortable, pain-free and happy. Cats do hide serious illness and pain due to survival instinct. A cat like him will be as tough as they come and he will hide symptoms. Hopefully, he's healthy for his age and might just need a steroid shot, worming and maybe some antibiotics. I would also suggest you only feed him wet food and no dry. Dry food can cause problem in a cats kidneys and bladder as well as their bowels as they can become chronically dehydrated.
    He sounds happy and I bet he loves being spoiled. xx
    @lorilu u has some great suggestions.
     
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