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Us, Dogs & The Law

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Sarahnorris, May 12, 2010.


  1. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    i have a few questions:

    1. if your dog and another dog were fighting and the other dog bit you while you tried to separate them, could you file for dangerous dog?

    2. say your dog went upto a man and a man really kicked it and broke its ribs or a leg or something could you sue him or charge him with something?

    im just curious to what could be done in these situations?

    and actually reading you may be thinking this is a result of my last post about the staffie :lol: but its a what if i guess :p
     
  2. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    I would guess...

    Probably not as you have endangered yourself by attempting to intervene. If you had a small dog which you had held aloft and was injured by another dog trying to get at it there would be a case but not if you have approached the fighting dogs and got involved.

    You could sue for damages (vet costs) and, depending on the exact circumstances, a charge of animal cruelty might be applicable.
     
  3. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    Regarding question 1 you can report a dog under the dangerous dog act even if you are scared it might bite you or if it accidently knocks you down so I think if you actually got bitten, regardless of circumstances, you'd have a case.
     
  4. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    Under sec. 3 DDA a dog may be considered 'dangerously out of control' if a person has reasonable fear of injury but if a person willingly put themselves in a position of danger (by separating fighting dogs) that is another matter.
     
  5. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    What if you are not 'trying to seperate the dogs' but pick your dog up out of a fight??
    If another dog attacked mine I would try to resce it and if I got bit Id want the other dog reported.:mad:
     
  6. SpringerHusky

    SpringerHusky PetForums VIP

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    Maya was kicked and although the police were phoned nothing came of it because she suffered no injuries :mad: but thankfully the guy has backed off and left us alone since.

    I have also been bitten separating a dog attacking another dog and again police were called but nothing was done at least not till 3 months later when the dog killed another dog.
     
  7. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    That is still interjecting yourself into a situation. Possibly, if you were attached to the dog by a lead...I dunno. I've never heard of sec. 3 being used in a dog-on-dog situation except for the blind woman whose guide dog was attacked. I suspect that, in that instance, the lady's disability was pivotal in persuading the court that a dogfight construed a reasonable fear of personal injury.

    An additional problem is that, in the confusion of violence of a dogfight, it can be difficult to know (much less prove) which dog administered the bite.

    If it were an isolated incident I honestly don't think you'd get far. However if the dog had a known aggressive temperament you could try the Dogs Act 1871. That applies to dog-on-dog as well (see Briscoe v. Shattock on UK Legislation | Case Law )so you wouldn't even need to get bitten.
     
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