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Urinating in house

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by Izzy95, Apr 20, 2019.


  1. Izzy95

    Izzy95 PetForums Member

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    I went to a rescue today to look at some cats and fell in love with one. She’s 11, but has been through 5 homes. The first 3 were a change of cirumstances, nothing to do with the cat but the last 2 were because she was urinaring in the house, on rugs, up the curtains. It seemed to be after visitors left. The rescue have said they’d like her to have a quiet home, it’s just me in my home but sometimes I do have people round.

    I know no one really knows but what do you think the chances are of this behaviour stopping if/when she settles in? I thought about giving her her own space, maybe even a dog crate (never shut!) with all of her things in an covered by a blanket so she has somewhere that is just hers. I don’t mind cleaning up after her but I’m not sure it’s something I can cope with if this is what she’ll do for the rest of her life. I have fallen completely in love with her though, I just want to make sure it’s right for both of us because she can’t keep going through homes poor thing
     
  2. Izzy95

    Izzy95 PetForums Member

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    Just to add she’s had vet checks and bloods taken and apparently she’s completely healthy. They have also sent some information off to a cat behaviourist who I’d be able to speak to
     
  3. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi @Izzy95 -

    I am afraid it is impossible to predict whether the cat will stop spraying if she settles well in your home. Your home is quiet, so it is possible she may feel more content, less stressed and this may certainly reduce the frequency of her spraying, but stopping altogether is another matter.

    It is quite likely when she sprays it's because she feels insecure and anxious and spraying helps to comfort her. This ties in with her spraying mostly after there have been visitors in her (previous) homes. Visitors make her feel insecure (perhaps she fears they have come to take her away from her home) and also they leave their scent behind them. So when they have left the cat sprays to deposit her own scent over the scent of the strangers.

    A few of my adopted rescue cats over the years have sprayed indoors. I have a rescued male cat at present whom I adopted as an un-neutered cat aged 18 mths old. I had him neutered immediately, but the fact he was so late being neutered is no doubt the cause of his spraying.

    I have over time been able to manage the spraying quite well and my cat can go for months at a time without spraying indoors, but then something upsets him e.g. one of my neighbour's cats will be aggressive to him, and the spraying starts again.

    If you do decide to adopt the cat my view is that you would need to do so on the basis you will keep her no matter what. Otherwise it is not really fair on her. If you are to have any real chance of success with stopping her spraying it is going to take time. It is unlikely to stop until she feels secure and settled in your home, and that could take up to a year. Especially as she is an older cat who will take longer to settle than a younger cat. It would not be fair to return her to the shelter after a year with you.

    Techniques I have used successfully with my spraying cats are as follows:

    1/ Allow 24/7 access to outdoors through a microchip cat flap (note, I usually keep my cats shut indoors at night but it is not a good idea with sprayers.).

    2/ Do not allow the cat access to any rooms with soft furnishings until she can be trusted not to spray. i.e. she is not spraying anywhere else. My current spraying cat is never allowed in my living room, though I do allow him in my bedroom and luckily he has never sprayed my bed. But I still don't trust him not to spray the furniture in the living room after one episode some years ago.

    3/ The supplement Zylkene is helpful to my current cat. It is not a drug and isn't addictive. It relaxes the cat without making him sleepy. My boy is on a month's course at present to help him relax.

    Zylkene can be given long term if necessary but I find it works best if given for a month and then have a break from it. After the last course he stopped spraying completely for about 6 mths, the longest he has ever stopped in the 7 yrs I have had him. You open the capsule of Zylkene and add the powder to food. Cats find the taste acceptable.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Zylkene-75mg-20-Capsules/dp/B00K06MAK2/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2SGHCC9KCLVZP&keywords=zylkene+75mg+for+cats&qid=1555797831&s=gateway&sprefix=zylkene,aps,239&sr=8-3


    Another calming supplement for cats is Yucalm. It has different active ingredients to Zylkene but has a similar calming effect.. Again. add the contents of the capsule to food.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lintbells-YuCALM-Calming-Capsules-Cats/dp/B07D4R4W2T/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=2SGHCC9KCLVZP&keywords=zylkene+75mg+for+cats&qid=1555797966&s=gateway&sprefix=zylkene,aps,239&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

    I'd be interested to know if you decide to take this cat on. It will be a challenge, I am fairly sure. But providing you don't have expectations of curing her completely of her spraying, you may be able to make it work. It would be lovely for the cat to have a home. :)
     
    #3 chillminx, Apr 20, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2019
    Gallifreyangirl likes this.
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