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Urgent Springer Spaniel HELP!!!

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by midlothianspaniel, Apr 30, 2011.


  1. midlothianspaniel

    midlothianspaniel PetForums Newbie

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    Really need help about my Springer spaniel male dog! He i only just 1 yrs old and everytime friends come to the house he urinates all over them and get excited. I now find my self raising my voice which scares him and I hate giving him wrong. I dont want to get rid of him because he is part of the family. Also when I bend down to put the lead on him he looks scared and urniates again. We have never harmed him so not sure why he is looking so scared Please help!!
     
  2. ChatterPuss

    ChatterPuss PetForums VIP

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    Sorry - not sure on this one but sounds a bit like he's a bit insecure and marking his territory. Try a DAP difuser to see if that helps him relax. I have just bought one for my pup as I've had amazing results on the one for my cat !!
     
  3. midlothianspaniel

    midlothianspaniel PetForums Newbie

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    Tried the DAP coller! WhenI say urinate I mean he squirts it out all over the place I have been brought up with dogs all my life and never seen anything like it:confused:
     
  4. vicki.burns

    vicki.burns PetForums Senior

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  5. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Has he always done the urinating or is it a new thing?

    As far as the lead thing, it may just be that he has a nervous disposition and doesn't like people bending over him - this can be pretty intimidating for a dog. Could you try crouching down to his level, preferably side-on, and see how he reacts to that? My dog is very confident but for a long time she didn't like people putting their hands over her head, I think because she couldn't see what they were doing.

    ETA: While it may be frustrating I don't think this is the sort of thing you need to re-home a dog over! A little bit of work with him and I'm sure you'll find a solution :)
     
    #5 McKenzie, Apr 30, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011
  6. ChatterPuss

    ChatterPuss PetForums VIP

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    My springer does the same thing. He gets exciting when either my husband or me come home from work! He rolls over and squirts our feet or whatever is in the way. My retriever pup did the same many years ago but he grew out of it!!
     
  7. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Some dogs pee with total over excitement, Others can pee with insecurity and fear, submissive urination. You dont say if you have had him from a pup, or an older dog, or how long he has been doing it for?

    I notice you say when friends come he gets excited and does it, Of course without seeing him I can only go by your post. When people come do they immediately start fussing and taking to him and immediately approach him. If they do, then whether its over excitement or nervousness, its either going to hype him up more and make him more exciteable if its that, or be too confrontational maybe if he is nervous.

    Either way, if they are giving him immediate attention then best thing to do is prime visitors to completely ignore him initially as if he isnt even there, no approach, talking,going to stroke him,eye contact nothing. If you can get some visitors or initially a visitor to help out that would be great.
    You can try a couple of things, to find out what works best for him. first is make him a safe area, in another room, when visitors are due, with his bed,some toys, chews (Chewings a good destresser for dogs anyway) Kongs are good too, solid rubber safe hollow toys you can stuff with wet food, with extra goodies like some chicken, biscuits, coat the inside with peanut butter or cheese spread then pack it with food. Put him in there awhile before they come to get him relaxed. When they come let them in, and ask them to sit quietly, give them some treats before hand, again high value, cheese,chicken,hotdogs,sausages are usually good. After they have been there for 5 or 10 minutes, let him out and all ignore him. If he stays calm, then just ask them to slowly and gently throw some treats in his direction but still ignore him. Then see if he approaches them, if he does then just ask them to still ignore put throw some treats down a bit nearer. When he approaches them, just ask them to speak softly and calmly, that goes ok then treat, then they can see if he will take a treat from hand, then a gentle pat and finally look at him. This should cover both bases, if its over excitement the calm introduction shouldnt over stimulate him to be more exciteable, if its nervousness then its not too confrontational and add to his insecurity letting him do everything at his own pace when he is ready for an introduction. If this goes well a few times, then you could.

    Have him out of his safe area, but still totally ignore him, do all the stages as before, quietly coming in sitting etc. etc. You could even try this first off but may be better to do the other suggestion first few times. You know him better and how bad he actually is so probably better to judge, what to try first.

    Please as hard as it is never shout at him, if he is fearful and uncertain its just going to make him even more so, if its exciteability it can hype them up even more much like your joining in with the exciteable madness.

    When you bend down to put the lead on and he urinates you say he looks scared? You dont mention what he is like out on walk, is he anxious then? if he is then it could be he knows leads mean dreaded walk and going out.
    Either way you need to make a good association with the lead.

    You could try getting the lead out, putting it down somewhere and ignoring it totally at first. If he is getting nervous about the lead, and starts to get upset as soon as he sees it this this should help break the association a bit especially if his nervous going out on walks. If he stays calm or better still goes to investigate the lead, then reward him with gentle praise and a high value treat for staying calm/investigating it. If that goes well then pick up the lead and just sit holding it, again if calm or he investigates it, give soft praise and several treats. Maybe then sit on the floor with it entice him over,more treats, then try cliping it on, (this way your not standing over him)
    if he accepts it, gentle praise and more treats. Then stand still calm=more treats, then few steps still calm=treat. Hopefully then you should be able to take him out.

    Dont move on to any stage too quickly do everything at his pace.

    One thing that may also help is a DAP diffuser or collar, its an artificial version of the pheromone mum emits to calm and soothe the pups. They do work on a lot of dogs to eleviate stress and anxiety and calm them if you would like to give it a go Vet-Medic - the same medicines as your vet at consistently low prices. is one place they tend to be cheaper than the vets.

    Having said all this, if after trying this, he is no better, I would suggest that you maybe consider getting a behaviourist to assess him and give you hands on help CAPBT COAPE Association of pet behaviourists and trainers are good.
    CAPBT - COAPE Association of Pet Behaviourists and Trainers E-Mail pethelp@capbt.org if you check the website or email them you should be able to find one in your area.

    Hope this might help.
     
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