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Unwanted chasing

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Pegatha5, Apr 3, 2021.


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  1. Pegatha5

    Pegatha5 PetForums Junior

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    Hi, I’m hoping for some advice. A few times now while out walking, my little dog has been chased by huge dogs. She is petrified and runs away with her tail between her legs. This seems to provoke the other dogs even more. A couple of times she has been bitten.

    The owners of these big dogs do not seem to be bothered at all. Even when I’ve asked them to call their dog off, they are slow to act, and their dog slow to respond.

    They seem to think their dog is just playing. But I find it very scary, and I don’t like to see my little dog so scared. Every time it happens I worry she will be attacked - as I said, it’s happened twice already. One time, I intervened, as I wanted save my dog from the big one that was chasing her around, but I ended up getting hurt by the big dog as it crashed into me.

    I am not sure if keeping my dog on the lead will help, as the dogs will still come running up and try to get at her. And she won’t be able to run, and I’ll get in the way and probably end up getting hurt again.

    Just hoping for some advice. Thank you
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    You absolutely need to intervene, whatever the risk to yourself.

    I would make sure her recall is spot on, call her back to you, and make her sit between your legs or behind you so that you can then deal with the other dog however you see fit.
     
  3. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    In this case you really need to call out a loud warning to the owners of the oncoming dogs to get their dogs under control. I think this is one scenario where even i might use the walking pole technique.

    The owners of the oncoming dogs are totally at fault, but to save stress and confrontation is there anywhere you can walk at all where this doesnt happen? Honestly, id look at changing walking location completely.

    If it's happening everywhere you walk with lots of different off lead dogs, i'd be sticking to on lead only parks or alongside livestock fields/high cliff tops where dogs will be on lead.



    I know full well you're not at fault here but sometimes you just need to avoid the situation to save your own dog. If it happens everywhere.


    The same dogs every time - speak to owner.
     
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  4. ShibaPup

    ShibaPup PetForums VIP

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    Keep her on lead - you can protect her then. As it sounds like she runs in fear when it happens - not sure how good your recall is to get her back in that situation.

    Teach her to get in to a position, such as middle (in between your legs) or behind you on a cue word, even while she is on lead - that way you're in front of her and the nuisance dogs so you're able to step in and protect her.

    Ask owners to recall their dogs politely first, then more sternly a second time - if they don't make an effort, take some cheap dog food out with you and throw it on the floor at the other dog. It'll keep the nuisance dog busy while you make your exit.

    Walk at quieter times if you can, especially if you want to let her off lead - ensure it's safe first and no dogs are around who's owners don't seem to have control. Ensure you have an exit plan or two, should a nuisance dog appear. There are other options - such as private field hire, you know she can safely run off lead in a secure area.

    Ensure your dog has great recall - so you can call her back if needed, you can move on before your dog gets chased or bitten.
     
  5. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    As suggested, teaching her a super strong recall with a position where you can protect her will go a long way towards actually being able to protect her. If she's running off, you can't help her. If she's running *to* you, you can.

    Several ways to deter oncoming dogs who are frightening her. One, have a pocket full of cheap treat, or even cat kibble (most dogs love it) and when a dog approaches, toss the kibble down so it scatters and the dog will hopefully busy himself searching out the treats giving you time to pick your dog up and move on.
    You can carry an umbrella that pops open (desensitize your dog to it first) or a stout walking stick to use to fend off oncoming dogs, but again your own dog needs to know to get behind you or in whatever safe place while you deal with the dogs.

    But it's all going to depend on you having to deal with the dogs.

    While you're teaching your own dog a solid recall and place position, keep her on a leash or long line (attached to a body harness, not a collar) so you can prevent her running off. Make sure you are proactive, and keep a sharp eye out for oncoming dogs so you can start bringing her in to you before she runs.

    I have a little dog who defaulted to running away when I first got her. This is where she is now, 7 months later. She has a good recall and she has a cue for going between my legs. I'm actually using it for several things, but a safe spot is definitely one of them.
     
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  6. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Along with the other excellent advice, carry a big stick. Seeing that may make the other dog owners hustle a bit to get their out of control dogs under control.
     
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  7. Pegatha5

    Pegatha5 PetForums Junior

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    Thank you all for the suggestions. It’s good to hear I’m not just being being silly or over-protective. Unfortunately I live in a rough area with lots of people who have big dogs and who are not very responsible or considerate. I won’t take my dog to the local park anymore because of this problem, I’m too scared now after my dog was attacked there twice. I always walk her in the local woods instead, a popular dog walking spot, but it happened again there a couple of days ago. Two teenage girls walking massive dogs, who did nothing when their dogs chased mine and bit her. Then talked back to me when I asked them to control their dog. Now I’m anxious about going back to those woods... I’m running out of options!

    I will try to be more vigilant and recall my dog at the first sign of a big dog approaching! And I’ll try the kibble thing too.

    @tabelmabel what is the walking stick technique?

    Somebody else suggested I take a water pistol and fire water at the other dog.
     
  8. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    Probably everyone on here except me can explain it - not a thing i have ever used but every time a thread like this comes up, many posters advice carrying a walking pole to fend off on coming dogs.

    I think it might be to hold across your body. Get your dog behind you and form a physical barrier between you and the oncoming dogs - like a shield.



    Is that right @lorilu ?
     
  9. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    I wouldn't know. If I carried a big stick to fend off dogs coming after my dog (or me, since I am dogless now), I'd be making sure the dog owner saw me waving it toward the obnoxious dog. If I needed to use it I would. I wouldn't have much force, and it would be unlikely to hurt any dog, but might fend them off. I'm a not very strong, over middle aged, lady. :)

    I have no tolerance for out of control dogs, and even a small dog jumping on me could hurt me. Fortunately,in the places I walk on a regular basis most of the people follow the leash laws and I don't feel the need to carry a stick.
     
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  10. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    Ah - i just tagged you as i saw you had mentioned the pole/stick there @lorilou but i know there are a lot of pf users advocate the use of the pole or stick.

    In this particular instance, i can see it could be very handy. I dont need a pole as my dogs are totally unfazed with any oncoming dogs and it doesnt really bother me either so it isnt something i have ever considered or used but i suppose i might if my dogs were terrified in the way OP's dog is.
     
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  11. Nicola234

    Nicola234 PetForums Senior

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    Hi and welcome to the forum :) I had similar issues with my dog, I have a great walk about 2 minutes from my house a huge wooded area with a path right down to the water, I walked my dog when I first got him for the first couple of months there, unfortunately, he was ran at and barked at badly with dogs a few times, I had to intervene and block him from the oncoming dogs, so I avoid it now which is unfortunate as it’s such a lovely walk, I now take him other places avoiding that area and most of the time take him further out in the car, some owners just don’t care what their dogs do and it can put your dog in a bad situation. It’s bad that you have to avoid areas but sometimes it’s the best choice. Some people are just selfish and think their dogs can do what they like no matter how it affects your dog.
     
  12. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    The point of carrying a hiking pole or long stick is to use it to fend off an approaching dog if the owner can’t or won’t recall their dog and your dog isn’t happy to be approached or you feel the dog isn’t friendly.

    If you keep your dog behind you and point the pole at the dog you can, hopefully, keep it several feet away.

    Most owners will then take steps to retrieve their dog incase it gets whacked.

    Incidentally, I never have had the intention or desire to whack a nuisance dog (their owner, many times ;)) but I wish I’d had a pole with me when Jack and I were attacked. That dog would have got whacked, if fending off hadn’t worked for sure, and maybe I could have saved Jack from getting bitten.

    I purchased the hiking pole after that incident and it made me much more confident that I could protect him. It had been a very unnerving experience, and it help me stay confident and relaxed on walks which obviously helped Jack not to have any hang ups.

    It’s a useful tool and definitely gives you a chance of fending off persistent nuisance dogs. I have several stout sticks dotted around on all our walks :)

    Generally, I manage to just avoid all but a few known, calm and friendly dogs with considerate owners by being selective where I walk and ready to change direction if I spot a potential problem dog.

    If Jack were small enough I’d calmly pick him up and walk off to avoid a nuisance dog starting to approach.

    If your little dog’s recall isn’t sound and she runs away in panic, I’d use a harness and flexi tape or long line so she is safe and you can retrieve her quickly at the first sign of a nuisance dog.
     
    #12 Lurcherlad, Apr 4, 2021
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2021
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  13. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I am like @tabelmabel and dogs running up to play are just normal social things to happen on a walk. If it bothered my dogs I would not walk where there are other walkers. There are no really busy places where I walk when I am at home but the other day when I walked mine 2 groups of large dogs ran up and greeted us. Quite frankly, why shouldn't they. The majority of dog walkers want their dogs off the lead and are happy for interaction so if you have a reason for not wanting this find somewhere different to walk. I have a friend who turns very nasty and report people to the police. She also picks her dog up and then wonders why she has dogs jumping up. She even had an extremely nasty go at me and looked like she would like to kill me, when Toffee ran along the path ahead of me to greet her - someone Toffee considers her friend as she frequently sits on her lap. I cant really understand why it is such a big deal . And before someone says that some dogs might be old or injured - when Candy had a prolapsed disc in her neck and needed to take extreme care for 3 months I CHOSE to walk her in a busy area when we were at the holiday cottage and it was my job to make sure that other dogs did not approach her. It was not exactly difficult to block approaching dogs and politely ask owners if they could make sure their dog did not bother mine as she had a neck injury. On the other hand if you have a dog that is going to be ridiculously and roughly boisterous or aggressive if you want it off lead go somewhere quiet.
     
  14. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    I really sympathise. I've had tiny dogs for years and have had the same problem . I seriously thought of not walking my tiny dogs but decided it wasnt fair to them . I think you need to keep her on a lead if other dogs around. Libby would run away in panic too and I have taught her to come to me when she feels scared. I taught her Lift but you can use any word . Practise at home first , say lift or your word and pick her up and give treat. Repeat . Then at the park when no dogs around . It has to be a solid behaviour before other dogs approach .

    I stand in front of her if other big dogs approach too fast or I pick her up too if I dont trust a dog but you have to be careful that the dog doesnt jump up. Ive also got hold of dogs collars and held them and even put them on a lead. If you get hurt then ring the police. The owners are a pain and rude too . If your dogs bitten they should pay the vet bills. You could think about wearing a video cam so you can film every thing that happens .

    Dog walkers who let their dogs run around out of control are utterly selfish. It is frightening when big dogs run up fast not just for your dog but you too. I was knocked over by a friendly golden retriever on a walk and it fractured my ankle and knee and I used to work at kennels and had to give that up.

    My dogs tend to be reactive since being attacked by german shepherds more than once a few years ago. Ive worked hard with them but any dog that comes bombing up can set them off . I have the right to walk my dogs in peace. I shouldnt have to drive to find a quiet spot . Fortunately , the GSD dogs (separate owners) have gone and I dont have to be on high alert all the time.

    ETA We have lovely considerate German shepherds owners too. One GSD Holly, a beautiful calm dog , she has been a great help in helping Libby and its great to see them trotting along together .
     
    #14 kimthecat, Apr 4, 2021
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2021
  15. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    If only all dogs were unaffected by being ran at, barked at, growled at, jumped on, licked etc., and could be let off lead and all people were comfortable around strange, boisterous dogs and we all had acres of empty space to walk in, life would be so less complicated :rolleyes:

    Or, maybe if everyone was just a little considerate (and obeyed the Law) ......?

    I doubt that, until some owners have a dog that isn’t ok around others (and there are many reasons - not just a fussy owner), they will understand or maybe they’ll just leave their dog to get on with it .... it’s what dogs do, after all.
     
    #15 Lurcherlad, Apr 4, 2021
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2021
  16. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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  17. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I think that's the point though, in the OP it sounds like the dog is genuinely afraid and *not* playing and it seems only right for the owners of the dogs who are bullying the little one to call them off.
    If I had a playful and easy going dog who was chasing a dog who obviously didn't like it, I'd call my dog off. Seems like common sense to me....

    And of course owners have to be proactive too. I have a new appreciation for keeping an eye out for dogs with little Penny, and I am more careful with her than I ever was with my normal sized dogs. I never worried about my dogs getting injured, rather being accused of inappropriate behavior. Now I do worry about Bates getting hurt by an overly boisterous dog and I do pick Penny up when I see a dog approaching who doesn't seem well controlled by the owners.

    Also, I'm lucky in that I have plenty of places for my guys to be off leash undisturbed. Not everyone has that. And when your walk areas are limited and then on top of that you have to try and avoid rude or uncontrolled dogs, I can imagine it gets old fast.
     
  18. Pegatha5

    Pegatha5 PetForums Junior

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    @Blitz I think we are talking about two different scenarios here. I am happy for my dog to interact with other dogs, and I like it when she plays with them. It’s when they start terrorising her that I start having a problem. The reason for my post was to ask for advice on what I can do when it happens, because my dog has been bitten twice in situations where the owner can’t or won’t control their dog and I worry it will happen again if I can’t protect my dog.
     
  19. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    Yes, I think in this situation it definitely is a case of finding a way to stop oncoming dogs coming anywhere near. I can well imagine, had I taken on a very nervy rescue dog, that I would be severely frustrated if oncoming dogs kept setting back my dog's confidence in every single location. This does sound like a case for the pole for sure.

    Where i do agree with @Blitz is that dogs approaching is a normal thing to happen on a walk in certain areas and many dogs (including mine) do enjoy a sniff, meet and greet and on they go again.

    When im working with Tilly with dummies or even just playing with a ball thrower, i dont set up in the middle of a busy park and expect everyone to keep their dogs away. To my mind, id almost expect a dog to run in and nick off with a dummy if i did that!

    I choose a quiet, remote area and if im disturbed, it is annoying but that is what can happen in a public space.

    By the same token, if i had taken on a very anxious dog, i wouldnt walk it in a busy public park and then start getting annoyed when dogs appeared. In that sort of situation i would build up to get the dog 'park ready' if i possibly could. Or avoid altogether.

    But i would get annoyed if i chose a quiet spot and owners made no effort whatsoever to keep away. And id get really annoyed if it was the same dogs each time and the owners gave no apology or made any effort to avoid a repeat.


    In this particular case, the OP has my every sympathy.
     
  20. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Of course no one should let their dog harass and chase a dog that is worried by it but there is a fine line. I would not let my dogs approach a dog that was nervous and I would be very annoyed if my dogs were set upon but there seems to be a general feeling on here that normal owners on normal walks that allow interaction are wrong.

    And if Lurcherlad was having a go at me - I did make a point that I had had 3 months where I could not allow other dogs to be rough with Candy. I also had a spell where she had been attacked and was initially terrified of other dogs - but in both cases I considered it my problem not every other dog owners.
     
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