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Umbilical Hernia Surgery for Shihtzu

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Sadaf, Dec 9, 2018.


  1. Sadaf

    Sadaf PetForums Newbie

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    My 4 month old Shih Tzu Puppy has an umbilical Hernia that the breeder didn’t inform us about and by the time we figured we had fallen in love with her.

    Anyway the vet says she needs a surgery and I’m petrified for her as she’ll get a general anaesthetic.

    Any advice regarding such a surgery, recovery will be highly appreciated.
     
  2. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Umbilical hernias aren't rare and don't usually cause a problem.

    Unless there are complications with this hernia, then why, if your Vet believes it requires attention, can it not be done when you have her spayed?

    That would seem the best course of action to me.
     
    Sadaf and wee man like this.
  3. KSvedenmacher

    KSvedenmacher PetForums Junior

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    Yoda has an umbilical hernia as well, he is 5 months. Our vet told us that as long as we can easily push the bulge back in and it doesn't hurt him, there is no need to treat it. We will get it taken care of when we get him castrated, but that won't be for another year and the vet doesn't seem concerned by this at all. Is the hernia causing your Shih Tzu problems?
     
    wee man likes this.
  4. Angrybird

    Angrybird PetForums Junior

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    The problem with leaving an umbilical hernia alone is that it can rapidly develop into quite a catastrophic/life threatening problem, and nobody can predict if/when it will happen.

    Vs. a young and otherwise healthy (presumably) dog having a general anaesthetic which are actually rather safe
     
  5. Sadaf

    Sadaf PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you the doctor believes that it’s grown bigger in the last month or so and can become problematic in case she hurts herself.
     
  6. Sadaf

    Sadaf PetForums Newbie

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    No problems at the moment but the doctor feels it’s grown bigger and might cause problems as she’s a very active pup.

    Was thinking of waiting but seems like the sooner I get it the better, just concerned that she’s still too young :((

    o pro
     
  7. Sadaf

    Sadaf PetForums Newbie

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    Yes she’s quite healthy and happy and VERY active. And therefore the doctor doesn’t want to wait as if there is a complication doctor won’t have much response time.

    Yes
     
  8. Sadaf

    Sadaf PetForums Newbie

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    Hello All,

    Thank you to all those who answered. Just wanted to update. Glitter had her Umbilical Hernia operated at 5 months.

    The surgery lasted a little over an hour. The doctor advised that she recovers from her anesthesia I’m familiar environment so we brought her home immediately. It took 24 hours to recover from the anesthesia with first few hours of severe disorientation.

    The wound itself took 10 days to heal. Her internal stitches dissolved and external once were removed.

    The doctor did not put a dressing on the wound and we had to apply disinfectant every day twice as well as orally feed antibiotic for three days.

    All in all the recovery was well and a month later she has no bulge or anything showing.

    Phew.
     
    Bugsys grandma likes this.
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