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Types of Cat Aggression, the signs and how to combat

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by luisa, Aug 3, 2010.


  1. stever

    stever PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for the excellent article...
     
  2. PEANUT1

    PEANUT1 PetForums Newbie

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    Hello

    Thks for the info, I have a question though. I believe my older female (Pebble -15 months) has territorial aggression. We picked up a stray kitten and adopted it. We didnt know any better at the time and just brought the kitten into the house and expected Pebble to accept it. Ever since then she growls when we pick her up or the kitten ( now 7 month old) comes near her. They do sometimes play together but most of the time she is pretty moody. How can I fix this since we didnt introduce them properly.
     
  3. fravimal

    fravimal PetForums Newbie

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    yeah, great post, thanks for the thorough run-down on behaviours
     
  4. nobby2000

    nobby2000 PetForums Newbie

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    hi have just joined thi ite..
    i have a cat called nobby love him to bits ..he is very loving and follows me everywhere . he its more or less on my face and is very sweet but then his eyes go crossed eyed and he will go for me then run off... not ure how to stop this as i don;t know why he changes so fast...
     
  5. babygirl017

    babygirl017 PetForums Newbie

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    wow this info was just what I needed for my Dexter. We adopted him from Va animal adoption center. He is now 5 months old. And does most of what was said. My hubby treats him diff then I do so Dexter is getting mixed signals! I try to tell hubby but he just convinced his way is better. He also feels that I should only b feeding him one can food a day...I disagree
     
  6. Lilly27green

    Lilly27green PetForums Junior

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    Hi,

    I am new to the forum and you seem very knowledgable,please could you give a little advice?

    I recently lost one of my cats and now have two elderly but fit females, I have rehomed a cat from the local shelter a female picked as she has gentle personality, and is 4 years old,she has had a rough time in the past,

    Things are going ok, with obviously a few hisses from mine but none from the newbie, the last couple of days she has benn rushing up to them, no hiss or growl but with a bushy tail turned sideways, not straight up,she backs off if they hiss and I usually intervene, do you think she is playing?

    I made the mistake of reading too much on the Internet and am now consumed with worry and becoming neurotic that it won't work out!

    Please do you have any advice to help me to stop worrying, as I say no real upset yet,

    Thank you so much
     
  7. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Hi and welcome to the forum.I dont have any experience of intro's,having only had to do this once .It may be better if you make a new thread asking for advice in "training and behaviour" section or in "Cat Chat" as this one can sometimes be a bit quiet.
    Did you introduce them slowly as this method tends to have better results .Have a read of this link in the meantime...........Living Together - Introducing a New Cat

    Good luck and keep us posted,oh and BTW we would love to see pics :D
     
  8. Lilly27green

    Lilly27green PetForums Junior

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    Thanks so much for your reply,I have read the article and it was very helpfully, we have had progress today in the form of "nose sniffing" so my worrying is stopping a little, it is nerve racking though,

    Thanks again for your time
     
  9. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    You are very welcome.Do come into "cat chat" and join in :D
     
  10. EddyB

    EddyB PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks very much for this article, particularly liked the tail part! I didnt realise relaxed but tip wagging was an indication of agitation!
     
  11. tbay007

    tbay007 PetForums Newbie

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    Funny thing, I knew all of this after 2 to 3 weeks of owning our kitten. I observed the way she stalked, played, being angry, and all of those moods. I wanted to be able to tell when she would attack and when she was aloof and relaxed.

    These are great tips to learn how to read your cat. A lot of them are very accurate, although I still haven't witnessed the tail between the legs yet. But I can vouch for the rest of the poses with the cat.
     
  12. JoeysMum

    JoeysMum PetForums Newbie

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    Ok, so i have 2 beautiful little girls (sisters) both 7 months old and one of them is super loving and playful ..i think... I've had cats all my life but none of them have been like these two! They are like a pair of dogs! Anyways 1 of them puurs like a maniac whilst shes rubbing up against me and flopping against me, i stroke her and the purring intensifies but after a few seconds she wraps herself around my arm (still purring) and places her mouth on my hand ( shes doesnt bite) and then stops and the whole rubbing, flopping and being silly starts again...is she playing?? I thought she was getting annoid but then why would she do it all over again?
     
  13. JordanWalker

    JordanWalker PetForums Junior

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    This is such a useful and informative thread about our pet cat. Thank you for the information on what are the signs of cat aggression and the tips on how to combat it. I'm so grateful that I found this thread. I have now an idea regarding cat aggression. Thank you so much for sharing it to us. Keep up the good work Lisa.
     
  14. Lingers14

    Lingers14 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I'm new to this so hope I'm in the right place to ask this question. I have two cats (1x male, 1 x female), both are about 10 years old (no idea if important. We are a well moved household and they are both used to moving and new houses. The last couple of times we've moved they have moved into an area with quite a few cats already and I believe they are being bullied or are just chickens when it comes to being outside around new cats. As such one cat has taken to poo'ing in my plant pots (sometimes even on top of wire mesh put there to stop her). The other is now going outside when pushed but choosing to poo when back inside the house (on one of our childrens book was a low point) or now in the middle of the grass in the garden.

    I have two toddlers and can't have cat poo everywhere, any ideas how to retrain them to poo over the fence or deterrents that I can use so they are not fouling an area where the kids may come into contact with it???

    Really can't bear the thought of giving them to another home but have no idea how to make it safe for all parties to live as we are!

    Thanks
     
  15. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Hi and welcome to PF.
    If your cats feel threatened when outside that is most likely the cause of them choosing to toilet inside.Cats are clean animals and this will be stressing them out as much as it is annoying you.
    You don't mention whether they have litter trays indoors or not,if not, then I suggest as a starting point you give them a couple of trays in a safe spot indoors to see if that sorts the problem.
    Even cats who prefer to toilet outside should always have a tray indoors .
    You say you don't want your kids to come in contact with the cats poo but if they go outside then you are just shifting the problem not curing .
     
  16. Kitchen Maid

    Kitchen Maid PetForums Member

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    The real problem we have is the aggression that other cats in the neighbourhood show towards ours. Blackie is very much an outdoor cat and our fences are old, have many holes underneath them. and it would be too expensive for us at the moment to replace them - besides cats can jump over them if they wish.

    This means that cats stray into his territory and he strays into theirs. On one occasion 2 cats came right up to the lawn outside our house to basically confront Blackie. Our French doors were shut so he had no choice but to defend his territory. It was only hearing some terrible screeching that I knew he was involved in a fight. (we were in the front lounge at the time). He very much got the worst of it - fur missing off his hind quarters - in fact black fur all over the lawn when we switched the patio light on. The other cat had the nerve to stand its ground even when I stepped out onto the patio until I screamed at it which made it run off. Blackie limped through the front door and up the stairs and slept until 1pm the following day.

    A couple of weeks ago, a b/w cat that I know belongs to neighbours over the road was boldly coming up to the steps to the top lawn and I found Blackie cowering inside the open French doors, hissing and growling - but clearly not wanting to fight.

    This morning I think Blackie went into the garden 2 doors along which this b/w cat also thinks is his territory. Again there was some terrible screeching which I instinctively knew belonged to Blackie so out I rushed, calling him and within seconds he came rushing back to our garden, followed in hot pursuit by the same b/w cat who is 17 years old and no slouch when it comes to fighting! Even when I yelled and stood behind it, he was hell bent on attacking Blackie in his own garden, with Blackie cowering against the doors of the chalet at the end of the garden in a submissive pose. A very hard slap on the hind quarters of this b/w cat soon stopped him in his tracks and he shot off back from where he came.

    After these fights/skirmishes, Blackie will only toilet indoors or outside if I'm standing by him.

    Do cats sense that another cat is weak? Blackie was the runt of a litter born on a farm and had hypothermia when he was born. Its got to the stage now where if we go out, even for a little while, I get him indoors as I'd only worry he might end up getting seriously hurt if we're not around to rescue him.
     
    #76 Kitchen Maid, Aug 23, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2014
  17. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    As Blackie is rather a timid boy it might be an idea for you to invest in a water pistol (you can buy cheap ones from ebay), and spray any strange cats that come into your garden. It will soon drive them away, you just need to persevere for a while.

    A bit of water won't hurt a cat, unlike a "hard slap" could. If I knew my neighbour was squirting water at any of my cats to keep them out of his/her garden I would have no objections, but if I knew they were slapping my cats, especially if it was a hard slap, I'd be furious!
     
  18. Kitchen Maid

    Kitchen Maid PetForums Member

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    We do have a water pistol - but it was in the garage and I could tell there wasn't a moment to lose in getting down the end of the garden to stop the fighting - or, as I knew, another cat attacking ours. As it happens, my husband has used the water pistol on this b/w cat but it hasn't deterred him from coming back. If I'd had water to hand, then I would have used it - though based on the fact that this cat seems to know no fear, I don't know what good it would have done in the long run.

    I'm not sorry I slapped the cat on his hind quarters - it'll take me a while to forget the fear on Blackie's face and the way he was cowering in front of the shed doors. As furious as the neighbour might be if she knew I'd slapped her cat, I was more than furious to see how her cat had no intention of doing anything but mauling our cat in his own garden. My shouts at him did nothing to deter him I rather feel that if I'd tried to push this cat away, I'd have been turned on.

    Later in the day I saw Blackie sitting at the edge of next door's garden peering into the one beyond, obviously nervous about venturing further. He looked round, saw me and decided it was safer to return back to his own patch. A lesson learned ... but doubt it'll be for long!
     
    #78 Kitchen Maid, Aug 23, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2014
  19. DarkAngelMJH

    DarkAngelMJH PetForums Newbie

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    My Sister and Mum bought 2 sisters, Sophie & Lexi about 5 years ago. Then after about 6 months of living together my sister moved out for 2 years. Then split up with her boyfriend and moved back with Lexi.

    When she was back Lexi started chasing Sophie upstairs and wouldn't let her downstairs in the living room & kitchen unless we were standing guard for Sophie.

    After about a year of this my sister moved out with Lexi again only this time Lexi went depressed and after 2 weeks she brought her back home. It took 3 weeks for Lexi to perk up and behave like herself again only now she's chasing Sophie even more and being a lot more agressive with it. We won't get rid of any of them but are hoping to make it a better place for Sophie so can feels she can come downstairs also. Currently her territory is my room where she gets fed and sleeps, her litter box is in the bathroom about 3 strides from my room. But all 5 cats also share this although there is also one in the kitchen downstairs and they can go out (Lexi, Sophie, Cassi, Rio & Luca - Luca can't go out due to not being old enough to be cut yet).

    Lexi doesn't chase Rio & Luca at all but both are young boys and below 2 years of age. She has now started to chase Cassi the eldest also who is now displaying the same signs as Sophie.

    I have now purchased a Feliway which will be here this week but has anyone any idea on how to help Lexi become more settled and stop chasing Sophie & Cassi?
     
  20. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    For chasing behaviour to be effective it needs two factors: a cat who chases and a cat who runs when chased. Once you have these two ingredients, then it is very hard, almost impossible, to stop it I'm afraid.

    For the cat (or cats) being chased it is enormously stressful, and it is very unfair to allow the situation to continue. You could end up with behavioural problems or physical health problems in Sophie and/or Cassie. .

    You can't stop Cassie and Sophie running I'm afraid (it is an instinct, some cats run some don't) But you can try and stop Lexi chasing.

    To take on this task you will need to be dedicated, patient and prepared for it to take weeks, if it works at all, which is not guaranteed. You will have to be prepared to follow Lexi around whenever you allow her to be in the same part of the house as Sophie and Cassie. You will need to step in the moment Lexi's body language shows she is about to chase one of them, and physically stop her. Firm, gentle, consistent repetition is the way to change cat behaviour. You can distract her with a game such as Flying Frenzy, or some treats, whichever she responds best to.

    Because the training of Lexi will be labour intensive, and lengthy I strongly recommend that you divide the house up so that Cassie & Sophie have one part to themselves and Lexi and the boys have the other half. The boys can in fact move between the two halves, if they get on with everyone.

    When I say "divide the house" I mean literally, installing a full size barrier door at the bottom or the top of the stairs. Make a full size door from a wooden frame and chicken wire, and fit this to a frame, then fit hinges one side and bolts the other side to keep it closed. It MUST reach the ceiling or you'll have the cats climbing over it..

    The idea is that Sophie and Cassie have a safe place in the house where they can go, where Lexi cannot chase them. This reduces their stress levels and gives them their self confidence back. Lexi can see them and smell them but she cannot chase them, so there is a chance she MAY become more accepting of them.

    However, to progress the relationships forward there need to be periods each day when Lexi and the 2 girls are together, and I suggest you limit these periods at first to one a day, an hour at a time. (You can increase them when you see Lexi's behaviour improve but not until then).

    You are going to have to be very vigilant indeed during these periods, and if Lexi does start trouble and you can't stop it in time, then Sophie or Cassie are going to get stressed, and this is what you're trying to prevent.

    If you follow this method exactly then you should see some improvement within a few weeks. Set yourself a time limit, e.g. 3 months, and if there is almost zero improvement in Lexi's behaviour in that time, then I think you have to accept she is not going to change. So then you'd need to keep the house divided permanently and not allow Lexi any direct contact at all with Sophie or Cassie.

    If you feel that's an impractical way to live, then I think you should consider rehoming Lexi. If she does not change her ways, it will be very apparent she does not want to share her territory with other females under any circumstances.

    EDIT: along with the above training you could also give the girls a course of Zylkene, a supplement which is calming where there are territorial issues. The capsules can be opened and the powder mixed with food. It is not cheap but can be effective sometimes.

    Zylkene Capsules - Pack Of 100 - 75mg - Animed Direct
     
    #80 chillminx, Oct 20, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
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