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Tumor

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Jazzyblu, Apr 13, 2017.


  1. Jazzyblu

    Jazzyblu PetForums Newbie

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    My staffy x American bull dog is 10 years old now & he's had this lump for just over a year. The vet said it is a tumor but he can't say anything else without doing a biopsy. The thing is the vet thinks it's a risk for him to go under anesthetic because he has a very big chest & his age goes against him. He has a few tumors on his neck & body too. The leg one is the size of golf ball & is turning white, has anyone come across this plz :(
     

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  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Many vets operate on many dogs over 10 years old...to check if there maybe a problem for older dogs especially, most vets recommend that they have pre op blood tests that check everything is working ok and sufficiently in the body, such as the liver and kidneys and heart etc and is something always worth doing for all dogs but especially seniors.
     
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  3. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Administrator
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    My 12yr old Dachshund had surgery last year for mammary tumours , she's deep chested in keeping with the breed. I wouldn't have thought that in itself was an obstacle to anaesthesia.
     
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  4. Jazzyblu

    Jazzyblu PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your replies, I was told a few years ago my dog probably won't live much past 8 years old because of his heart. I brought him home from Australia on pet passport & was told his heart not very strong. He has outlived that so far but I'm not pushing him into surgery. Was just wandering if anyone else had had these tumors that turn white & what to expect. Thanks x
     
  5. Ceiling Kitty

    Ceiling Kitty Hides away from much through humour...

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    It's hard to predict the precise course of events, as they can be very variable.

    Fast-growing tumours can outgrow their blood supply and become necrotic ('dead'), or split the skin overlying them. In these cases, infection and pain are frequent consequences. If the tumour is malignant in nature, then spread to other organs is possible.

    Sometimes we see benign tumours that grow extremely slowly, in which case there may be no consequences at all unless the growth is interfering with movement or gets caught/chewed.

    An FNA ('fine needle aspirate') may help narrow down the type of tumour to give you a better idea of prognosis. This can be done conscious, and involves inserting an ordinary needle into the lump and sucking out cells. The cells are then squirted onto a microscope slide, which can be sent to the lab. It's quick and easy to do, but has limitations. Some growths do not 'shed' cells well, leading to a dry sample. And sometimes tumour cells can be swamped with inflammatory cells which makes them hard to assess.

    It's a test worth looking into, but be prepared that the lab could come back with some useful info, or could come back and say: 'we're not sure - you need a full biopsy'.

    Best of luck.
     
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