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Training Very Hyper Puppies

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by bbc779, Mar 16, 2017.


  1. bbc779

    bbc779 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Everyone!

    I'm currently fostering two 9 week old puppies, and i'm trying to train them on some basic commands. My issue is that they are way too hyper and I can't get them to focus to even get into the sitting position.
    If i have a treat in my hand to lead them into sitting position, each puppy will be so obsessed with the treat in my hand they will continuously jump on me trying to get to my hand until they get the treat, so the objective of getting them to sit is null.

    They have not received all their shots yet, so I cant take them for walks to burn some energy and i live in Canada so my yard is full of snow.

    Maybe i've been lucky with previous dogs and this is the norm but how to i teach these puppies to not jump for the treat and have them listen?

    Please help!
    Thank you!!!
     
  2. leashedForLife

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    with respect, this is horse-apples:

    "They haven't had all their shots, so I can't take them for walks to burn some energy, & i live in Canada, so my yard is full of snow."
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    - Parvo is the thing U fear; news bulletin: IT'S MARCH - IN CANADA. Parvo is frozen solid, or will be in 5-mins or less. :rolleyes:
    Besides,
    Parvo is not a threat to 9-WO pups; 85% of 8-WO pups will survive an actual infection with only decent home nursing - no vet. Conversely, 85% of all 5-WO pups will DIE of Parvo, even with 24/7 vet care in a round-the-clock clinic. Why? - age. Younger pups with their rapidly-growing GI tract are far more vulnerable.
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    Please read the sticky on Risk / Benefit & socializing pups, on this subforum. Dr Anderson's open letter explains very well why
    socialization & habituation - or the lack of them, or a delay till 3-mos age or older! - is more of a threat to pups' lives than Parvo. :(
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    Get them out, have them run or swim or hop thru the snow - it's great exercise.
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    Meet other dogs - who are NOT the threat, their WASTE is.
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    Meet at least 25 new friendly strangers, each week. Yep, i did say 25 per week, who don't look, act, sound, smell, eat, etc, like U - nor like one another. Diet, age, manner, language - tall, short, fat, thin, with insectoid mirror sunglasses, swishing nylon clothing, dangling sashes, jangling bangles, rattling chains, a jailer's key ring, squeaky leather pants, stinky PVC clothes, fast-talking loud ppl, slow-talking quiet ppl, crying babies, shouting boys, _____ .

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    They need to meet 100 friendly strangers by 12-WO. Good luck - get moving. :)
    Of course, they're 9-WO... U have 3 weeks, U need to meet 33 or 34 ppl per week. :oops: Gee, math... it's everywhere.
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    Wiz201 likes this.
  3. leashedForLife

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    just as an aside -
    odds are they won't get that precious "last shot" till they're 12-WO -- & it won't be fully effective for another month.
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    U give them a vaccine; the BODY must have time to react & produce antibodies. That takes approx 28-days.
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    U won't realistically "keep them at home" until they're 4-MO, will U? -- they'll lose all chance of socialization, as anything from 6-MO on is considered B-mod, not socialization [meeting other living beings, under planned, happy circs] or habituation [careful positive exposure to stimuli & contexts that they will be expected to encounter during their lives].
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    so stop fretting, get them out & about - alone, as well as together; meet other dogs, other humans, cats [with Pup on leash & cat on a higher elevation], horses, chickens, cows, sheep, watch birds, see wildlife... Introduce them to elevators, cars, traffic noise, sirens, the vet's S/S exam table, the waiting room with parrots & Guinea pigs, a groomer's salon, a pet-supply, the hardware store, feed 'n seed, _________ .
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  4. leashedForLife

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    Strange! - duplicate post. // Sorry.
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  5. bbc779

    bbc779 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for the rude and judgemental reply! Much appreciated!
    I did not mention parvo, or socialization in my post, but you felt the need to lecture me on it. These puppies have met multiple cats, and multiple new people every day since I have taken them in.
    I'm fostering from a rescue that brings their puppies in from northern canadian reserves. I'm going to make some sweeping assumptions as you did and say that you have no idea what kind of shape the rescue receives these puppies in, and you just decided to throw some judgement my way.

    Just this week a 6 month old puppy was taken in by the rescue with parvo. IN MARCH! IN CANADA! Can you believe it?! Last week an 11 week old and an 8 week old with parvo! IN MARCH!

    As I said in my post, these are foster puppies. The rescue would not supply me with leashes because they would prefer they not be walked at this point. I volunteer for them and they set the guidelines.

    So thank you for popping by, but your opinions were not asked for or needed.
     
  6. leashedForLife

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    Pups in SHELTERS or in RESCUES can contract Parvo from other animals *in that setting* -it's not freezing, indoors.
    A puppy on leash outdoors in under-32'F temps can't "catch" Parvo from other dog's feces unless they step in it, inhale it, or ingest it, *Before* it literally freezes.
    U can easily see where there's recent, still-steaming feces - the pup's on a leash, & less than 6-ft from U, aren't they?
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    A pup in a foster home is not at risk, walking on a sidewalk in freezing temps.
    Also, Parvo is lethal to underage pups, it's not a death-sentence for pups 8-WO or older - which Urs clearly are.
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    If U think i'm just a judgmental bag of hot air, that's Ur right & privilege. OTOH, Dr Anderson's open letter has links to the various studies on the fatality of under-socialization & the resulting problem behaviors that can cause owners to surrender their dog or pup to a shelter or rescue, where they might not be as lucky as they were the 1st time around, & are euthanized rather than adopted.
    :(
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    Here's a link to Dr A's letter to other vets:
    http://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/...dogs-vs-risk-of-contagion-cost-benefit.75012/
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  7. leashedForLife

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    re the hyper part:
    Use tethers to control the pups; turn away abruptly when the pup jumps up. // Give them a few seconds to think about that; go back, have a treat in hand, lure them into a position change - stand to sit, sit to down, down to stand, stand to down, down to sit.
    Every time they jump up, turn away, wait 10 to 15-seconds, come back. A 2-ft long tether is plenty, it's not for running around, but for sitting or lying down - or standing briefly before relaxing. A bath-mat works well to give them some padding & boundaries / a sense of place.
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    Clickers are extremely helpful to make communication easy - mark what U want, any time U see it. U can capture, lure, or shape behavior - all 3 ways each have their own advantages, depending on what U are teaching or try to catch as it's offered.
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  8. bbc779

    bbc779 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your help.
     
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