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Training Advice - Mixed Breed

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Boyswithdogs_62, Nov 14, 2020.


  1. Boyswithdogs_62

    Boyswithdogs_62 PetForums Newbie

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    I have recently become the owner of a 6 month old Springer/Beagle/Terrier girl. She was apparently house trained and had a good grasp of basic commands. However, since we have had her at home she has been very difficult. She has wet her bed repeatedly. She has also wet in the house a number of times (despite being out only a short time before).

    She is quite bitey and doesn’t ever settle - no matter how tired so we end up needing to crate her to encourage rest and sleep. She sleeps through the night and is dry so I know she can hold her bladder for a good amount of time.

    We had a trainer this week advise some back to basic stuff but I wondered if anyone had any thoughts? We’ve had a lab before and never had any of these issues. She isn’t very enjoyable at the moment so I am a little concerned it’s her character rather than a training issue.

    All thoughts gratefully rcvd.
     
  2. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Honestly, I doubt it’s her character ;)

    It’s more likely to be behavioural ime.

    What's her history?

    How long have you had her?

    In what situations does she wee?

    How do you clean up/wash her bed?

    What do you do when she’s wee’d?
     
    Sarah H and LinznMilly like this.
  3. Boyswithdogs_62

    Boyswithdogs_62 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the reply. We’ve had her for two weeks. We live in a similar environment but she was on a farm before with 25 acres to roam and another dog. When she spot she has weed I quickly take her out - but by then it’s too late. Re her bed we didn’t realise until we could smell it so I immediately washed and freshened her bed (in mashing machine), I wondered if it was a comfort thing but my understanding was that dogs wouldn’t wet their own beds? She also wees if v excited so we’ve tried to keep things calm for her.

    She also quickly gets bored of high value treat training. She steals things she finds and bombs off around the house and it’s v v difficult to get to her. We have high value treats to offer but more often than not it seems she would rather just chew the pencil/worm/Lego than have the treat.

    She is walked regularly but we keep her on lead because she has no recall - even with treats, she works to her own schedule so we are being as strict as poss.
     
  4. Boyswithdogs_62

    Boyswithdogs_62 PetForums Newbie

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    She also barks every time a door is closed - even if we are in the same room. She just whines and barks her demands which again we haven’t experienced before.
     
  5. Boyswithdogs_62

    Boyswithdogs_62 PetForums Newbie

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    And she bites....often and can jump and attempt to nip as well. Something I’m keen to get sorted as we have three children (her previous home had 4 children).
     
  6. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    She sounds a lot like the swamp rat demon puppy we took on about 3 months ago. She too wees in the house, bites everyone except our older dog who is the only one who has any control over her, she also grabs things and takes off with them, plays keep away, she's not super barky, but she does startle at noises and I think if she were a barker she might bark when she startles too. Technically ours is not a puppy, she's probably more like a year old and definitely old enough to know better, but she's still a total PITA.

    Sanity savers:
    1) Management. Baby gates and closed doors are your friends. I keep the little monster contained to a space I can watch her in. If I'm in the kitchen, she's in the kitchen with me where I can watch her. If I'm in the laundry room, I gate her off to the area I can see her in.
    2) Go back to square one with toilet training. It has taken me an embarrassingly long time to figure out her wee cues, but now that I know them, I can watch her and get her outside before she wees in the house.
    I have to go out with her because she has the attention span of a gnat and if I don't go out with her and say "go pee pee" she'll forget whey she's out there, chase the cats and pounce on frogs, and come back in and pee on the rug. So every time I go out with her, tell her to pee and reward her when she does. We're down to about 1 or 2 accidents a week now and every one was humans being inattentive.
    3) Lower your expectations, or alter them. The first few months are really labor intensive. You have to put in the leg-work with training, and bonding, and routines, and learning each other, but it does pay off in the end. You're going to get shoes chewed, ankles nipped, and wee-ed on carpets. It's just life with a puppy. Eventually they do grow up. Try to enjoy the cuteness and overlook the annoyances (while still working on them), but know that most of it is just a function of time. Toddlers don't potty train in a day, dogs don't either. Stay consistent and be patient :)

    Bear in mind that 2 weeks is really no time at all. It take a new rescue a good 6 weeks or more to really settle in to their new home and learn the new environment. Give yourselves both time.
     
  7. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Perhaps she wasn’t really fully toilet trained if she had lots of time outside roaming?

    I’d definitely go right back to basics and get her outside often, after eating, sleeping, playing etc.

    She could be a bit anxious too, which can cause pee issues.

    Any negative reaction to the pee could cause further issues, so just ignore it and clean up. Major praise when she toilets outside.

    There could be residual odour in her bed which might encourage her to pee again. Same with rugs or areas of floor. A warm biological solution and thorough rinse might eliminate that. Or block an area if she’s drawn to it.

    I’d put up a baby gate and put her (or yourselves) behind that if she’s hyper/bitey and offering a chew toy doesn’t divert her.

    Once she’s calm return - rinse and repeat. She should learn hyper/bitey = end of attention/game.

    You’ll need to train the kids too ;)

    I’d put everything you don’t want chewed out of reach and use the crate or baby gate to give the kids a clear space to play.

    Maybe these issues are why she was rehomed? Perhaps she spent time being shut away, hence the dislike of closed doors? Baby gates help with this whilst giving control of areas.

    Tired pups are like tired toddlers so ensuring regular naps should help too. If she’s happy in the crate then in there with a filled Kong is good and often encourages them to snooze.

    Look at kikopup and positively.com for tips on recall and other training.

    Two weeks isn’t very long for a rehomed dog to settle so things should improve with time and patience.
     
    Sarah H, JoanneF and LinznMilly like this.
  8. Boyswithdogs_62

    Boyswithdogs_62 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you both - very helpful to have some perspective. I imagine yes as she was out on land off lead a lot the ‘training’ was quite loose. She is just quick unlikable at the moment! She isn’t really interested in us at all - happy to walk off and look for a table leg to chew on rather than play. But perhaps as you say it’s due to only being 2 weeks in.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
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