Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Toilet training help...

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by DexandPix, Dec 19, 2018.


  1. DexandPix

    DexandPix PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi folks,

    Just after some toilet training help. Ive trawled through the internet but cannot find my specific scenario and so am just after some help.

    I have a mix breed 20 month old - I think he is a mix of chihuahua, jack russell with daschund colouring.
    He hardly ever poos in the kitchen at night but does sometimes give the table and chairlegs a good spray.

    The other dog we have is a 4.5 month old jack russell bitch. She wees and poos anywhere and everywhere in the kitchen. We lay down mats but she tends to cover those and if she doesnt find a clean patch on the mat she will just go anywhere. She is also playing with her own poo! lovely I know.

    They both have their own crates, though mostly sleep together at night and the crate doors are left open.
    I'm thinking now about crate training them overnight but wanted to know.....will this work?

    My plan is to feed them around 17:00 - 18:00, let them out around an hour later if I dont spot the warning signs beforehand, and of course let them out should they seem to indicate they need to go then let them out at around 11:30, midnight-ish for a final time. After that, cage them until around 7:30 in the morning to which I will open their crates to let them out and reward the toilets. I do reward the young puppy treats when she goes outside now anyway but then should I be treating my older pup if he does it all outside too? Will the younger pup learn from him also? I only ask because our vet told us we shouldnt be treating him going outside as its like rewarding an adult for going to the toilet. I think the older dogs problem is he just is used to be able to do it whenever and wherever he wants. Being in his own bed may just encourage him to hold it until hes outside.

    I may start to take away the mats at the back door also as it seems she knows to do a very small wee and get the treat. then ten minutes later will do another on the kitchen floor.

    And one final thing. We let her out, wait in the garden and she will maybe wee and maybe poo. Sometimes shes out for 10-15 minutes and as soon as were back in the house, and turn our backs shes done a poo inside. How do I combat that?


    Thank you in advance, you people are brilliant!
     
  2. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Messages:
    4,973
    Likes Received:
    8,801
    Just setting the crating overnight idea out of it for a moment -

    Is your older dog accident free during the daytime?

    I would get rid of your mats. Give your kitchen a really good clean, table and chair legs. Use the urine off spray after cleaning and start again with house training your dogs.

    If they are clean and dry by day, you're half way there. Yes, treat for outside toilets and give your cue word AS they are toileting (not just after) so you say 'wee wee wee or pee pee pee' or whatever it is the entire time you see urine coming out.
    For poo you can still use "wee wee" or "busy busy" if you want to use a different word.


    You don't turn your back on a pup in training during the day. You have to watch them like a hawk. This is much easier if your pup is restricted to a puppy pen. Or you can attach your pup to you on a house line. For when you really cannot be watching, crate.

    As soon as you see an accident about to occur or occuring you scoop pup up and outside asap.

    I don't see a problem rewarding an adult dog for doing the toilet outside in the right place, especially with a dog like yours that isn't 100% there yet.

    Night time. You have a major problem there by the sounds of things. If they will tolerate the crate doors closed, good plan.

    Your dogs (even your pup) should not need to be pooping during the night unless there is an upset tummy problem.


    The younger pup will not learn from the older dog. I wouldn't just be letting them out - i would take them out (even into the garden) on leads because you need to see them in the act to praise. And you want to make sure they have actually toileted.

    Also, if you are physically there to see every poo and wee they do, certainly with poos you will quickly see what their pattern is and how many poos they generally do during a day and what times.


    There's just a few pointers to get you started. With all toilet training (whether puppies or human toddlers) what you want to be aiming for is preventing mistakes from occuring. And the only way to do that is to put restrictions on freedom and control the environment til they have got it.

    So you watch them, reward correct behaviour and limit opportunities to make mistakes by not allowing them to run about out of your sight.

    HTH and good luck!
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Messages:
    7,480
    Likes Received:
    15,118
    Are you involved in selling/marketing this course by any chance?
     
  4. danielled

    danielled Guest

    That’s avoiding the question.
     
  5. DexandPix

    DexandPix PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi, I never thanked you. Were at a point bow where every hour or two were letting them both out and saying wee wee before during and after they perform. sometimes the older dog does it but im outside with them and the door shut and. o ody goes inside until both have wee’d, which is going well. we still get little wees in the kitchen and had an accident today in the living room. whenever shes in the living room i watch her and as soon as she sniffs heavily and circles or even goes to crouch i make a loud ‘UH UH’ and puck her up and straight outside i go with her. when she pees on the floor in the seconda i take
    my eye off her. i take her to the wee and show it to her, then put her outaide for 5 minutes as a telling off almost. is that ok to do?
    also they now stay in their separate crates overnight and NO accidents in there crates as yet, they do really well. Its nice not waking up to carnage in the mornings! the older dog never poos in the kitchen and i think had one accident in the kitchen in the last month but hes 20 months old so hes still youngish!
    am i headed in the right direction with toiletry training?
     
  6. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Messages:
    4,973
    Likes Received:
    8,801
    Heading in the right direction yes and it sounds like things are improving.

    Only say wee wee when you see urine coming out. Not before. Not after.


    And don't do the time outside punishment thing. Your dog won't have any idea what that means!!

    Ignore any accidents that you discover too late. The ONLY time you can get any message over to the dog that it is wrong to mess inside is if you catch it IN the act (or immediately before)

    Immediately before and the uh uh noise is perfect and rush outside.

    In the act, pick up and say 'quick out quick out' and get outside quick.

    The fastest results are gained by being there for all outside toilets and being generous with the treats.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    20,533
    Likes Received:
    27,438
    Don’t punish or try shaming a dog by showing the accident and telling off as that will create more issues and can make them scared to toilet in front of you.

    An ah, ah if caught in the act and popped straight outside then mega praise for going outside.

    Totally ignore accidents.

    Clean up with hot biological solution, rinsed well and dried.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice