Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

To castrate or not?

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Rubynoodles, Nov 17, 2012.


  1. Rubynoodles

    Rubynoodles PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am a bit confused.

    We have only had Archie for 3 weeks, we were told by the owner he was 4 months old but when we took him to vets two weeks ago for his first jabs she said looking at his teeth he was at least 5 months old. I asked her about when to castrate him and she said not to bother as it wouldnt make any difference to his behaviour or health etc??!!

    Yesterday, Archie had his 2nd set of jabs and this time it was a senior nurse who said that looking at his teeth he was at least 6 months old and when were we thinking of getting him castrated!! I said the last vet said not to bother and she then said 'oh thats not right getting him done will calm him down, reduce the testosterone in his body, reduce unwanted behaviour, marking his scent everywhere and reduces the risk of certain cancers'.

    Now Im confused, I was always let to believe castration was for the best when calming unwanted behaviour etc so was the vet right or did the nurse just want some extra money out of us??
     
  2. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    Opinions differ, a lot of vets now advocate spaying and neutering before a first season or when a male is about 6months, others say after a first season minimum or when a dog has reached sexual maturity and finished growing. Some people dont bother to have males neutered at all especially if they havent got any behavioural problems linked to testosterone or sex hormones. Like humping, scent marking and agression to things like other males.

    Ive had mine done, and it certainly can be beneficial in bitches who can get problem seasons, mammary tumours, phantom pregnancies and life threatening uterine infections like pyometra later in life. Ive always personally had mine done much older though after seasons for bitches and when the males are 16/18 months old at least when they have finished growing and reached physical and sexual maturity.
     
  3. pogo

    pogo PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
    8,423
    Likes Received:
    688
    I personally do not neuter unless medically they need it.

    Alot of vets claim that neutering will magically calm all dogs down and they will behave perfectly and it doesn't work like that, some will calm down, some will behave worse etc

    Also for me there are more health benefits for keeping them entire then neutering
     
  4. SLB

    SLB PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2011
    Messages:
    12,225
    Likes Received:
    3,891
    My beliefs are that if he doesn't have a medical reason to have them chopped - then leave it. I also think that if behavioural issues occur, firstly to seek advice and help, then try the implant/chemical castration then neuter. If there is no reason to take them away then why not let him keep them? As long as he is socialised well, trained well and kept away from bitches in heat then you'll have no reason.

    We are currently going through our options with my 2 year old entire boy. I am thinking of putting him on the implant but friends have said it seems more of a confidence issue so we will be seeing a behaviourist first before seeking advice from the vets.
     
  5. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    7,718
    Likes Received:
    1,035
    I have only ever owned male dogs, they have all been entire. I would only have a dog castrated on medical grounds or if advised by professionals due to behavioural issues.

    As you say some people have their pets castrated as a preventative measure against certain cancers.

    I own a SBT he lives with three indoor cats, he is well socialised around other dogs, however he will rise to a challenge. imo this is not dog aggression, merely protection.

    Castration may calm hormonal behaviours down, but I haven't found any excessive hormonal behaviours in any of my dogs past or present. I have a strict but fair training regime that continues throughout the dogs lifetime. The dogs are eager to please for a treat and love the attention, at the same time I have a dog that behaves to my liking/standard.

    I would honestly say six months is a bit early, but I am no expert.
     
  6. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,996
    If it aint broke why fix it? In any case unless there were overwhelming reasons to castrate ie no fences, no owner control, entire bitch in house, why castrate at all?

    If you ARE going to neuter, you need to be aware that sex hormones govern more than the ability to procreate they also affect growth ie their removal delays the closure of the growth plates so neutered dogs of both sexes tend to grow taller and it alters the angles of certain joints which can predispose a dog to develop cruciate ligament problems etc.

    So wait until at least 18 months old if possible in order to avoid most of these issues.
     
  7. sillygilly

    sillygilly PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    1
    My boys are entire and are fine and healthy. The only problem is marking when out but they dont mark in the house and are not aggressive. I agree if it isnt broke dont fix it. From what Ive seen theres as many health problems with neutered dogs, ie their increased weight.
     
  8. Hanlou

    Hanlou PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,602
    Likes Received:
    565
    *If* I do castrate my future dog I wouldn't do it until at least 18 months for the reasons SB mentioned. :)

    Well worth doing some research before you make a decision though.
     
  9. Rubynoodles

    Rubynoodles PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks all - my hubby doesnt want him castrated so I think we will leave him be at the mo:)
     
  10. JANICE199

    JANICE199 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    31,053
    Likes Received:
    4,092
    I have had mostly male dogs all my adult life and have never until last year had one castrated.I only had him done as i also have a female. Having him castrated has made no difference what soever in his behaviour.
     
  11. Frankthewonderhound

    Frankthewonderhound PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    2
    Mine had it done nearly 3 weeks ago, I personally don't think it's changed his behaviour with other dogs or people at all, admittedly it's still early days.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice