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Three legged Netherlands dwarf

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Jem1989, Jan 8, 2019.


  1. Jem1989

    Jem1989 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi there. I have a Netherlands dwarf bunny who is around four years old. About 2.5 years ago she had an accident and broke her back leg which required an amputation. She doesn't get around too well. She tries to bomb about a lot and ends up falling over.
    She likes a wee hidey place under the TV so I put sheets and blankets down for padding and also because she pees all over the place.
    I clean her entire cage out every 2-3 days because of the peeing everywhere.
    I need to give her baths and trim her butt because she can't clean herself properly. She gets very dirty because she just goes to the bathroom and then sits in it, and she loves to spin around on the spot, which makes the matting so much worse.
    I have tried many times to litter train her,. Watched many videos on this and nothing has taken.
    She gets badly matted, which I try to keep on top of every few weeks with bathing and haircuts, but she also gets bald spots near her stump area. This occasionally has sores on this as well.
    I am trying my best, but very worried that I am not doing enough for her. Is this normal for her to be in that sort of state with a disability. Or am I doing something wrong? I hate to think of my bunny as being unhappy.
     
  2. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    It's difficult to care for disabled buns. I recommend sudocrem for her sore skin and some sheets of vet bed you can change every day as this will wick away the pee so she's not sitting directly in it.
     
  3. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    I would also recommend carefully monitoring her remaining leg as it will be compensating a lot and more prone to arthritis as she ages. It will be a constant assessment of quality of life for her.
     
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