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Thinking of getting a dog/puppy ?? The realities.

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by RAINYBOW, Nov 25, 2010.


  1. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    The last time I went on holiday was 2005, the year before I got Ferdie. He was 12 stone of clingfilm! He wouldn't even go for a walk without me, so leaving him was not an option. I have missed weddings and other family functions because I wouldn't leave my dogs. I wouldn't trust anyone else to look after them. Now I am dog free and I miss them like hell; the cat simply isn't the same. Will I ever get over the urge to pounce on every dog I see and give him/her a cuddle?
     
    Rott lover likes this.
  2. Huskyhomelove

    Huskyhomelove PetForums Newbie

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    Husky puppies ar most interesting, - if you have them then you will need reorganize all house :)
     
  3. Rott lover

    Rott lover once you go black and tan you never come back

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    I havnt as of yet lol
     
  4. Lottie9330

    Lottie9330 PetForums Junior

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    I had no idea what i was in for when i got my puppy! My own experience:

    1. No longer house proud. Apart from dog stuff everywhere its harder to find time to clean with a puppy following you everywhere. Ruining your freshly mopped floors. Prepared to be a tad untidy and dirtier than your normal proud self.

    2. Cost is more than i expected. A simple problem such as chronic diarrhoea has cost me over £250 over a 4 month period. £50 pound a month on food. Toys and new bedding as your puppy loves to chew and ruin everything it has whilst teething. Day care costs so you can both work full time and ensure puppy is looked after whilst your both on 12 hour shifts.

    3. Training is not as simple as the books make out! Its a frustrating nightmare task and just when you seem to think youve trained your dog she ignores and goes back on everything youve taught her.

    4. Unable to do what you want when you want because your life now fully revolves around a puppy.

    5. Sleepless nights with a crying puppy.

    6. unable to enjoy something to eat without your puppy crying at you and trying to steal your food.

    7. When your feeling ill and just want to lie in bed to recover you can't because youve got a dog that needs walking and if you dont walk them then your puppy turns destructive and will try and get into everything they shouldnt!

    And finally the risk of getting puppy blues or as i call it post puppy depression when you cant stand the sight of your puppy and are full of regrets and you just cry all the time because you feel like you cant have a life anymore. Only a very temporary feeling but an awful one at the same time.

    However this all passes after a.few.months and the love you have for you puppy is more than youd expect. You'd do anything and love the cuddles and the company. Once you get passed the first few months its brilliant and you cant imagine your life without her.

    Its tough but its worse it. Definitely not a quick decision to make though. Needs to be well thought through!!
     
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  5. nicky k

    nicky k PetForums Newbie

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    Haha I have a spaniel too and it took long hours months and plenty of determination for her to walk at my side waiting for me to make next command ,she's amazing dog and I'm proud coz I trained her :)
     
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  6. bullmastiff_mama

    bullmastiff_mama PetForums Newbie

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    Spot on!!
     
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  7. bullmastiff_mama

    bullmastiff_mama PetForums Newbie

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    Agreed on the "raised" feeding/drinking question. 15 years ago they told us raised feeding, now do not raise. We still use raised, but are careful to control the other factors that can cause bloat. We feed small meals twice a day, no exercise or rough play for at least one hour before and especially after meals, no water gulping after meals or excercise, wet food can reduce risk (we still use dry). Slow down eating if necessary. Age is also a factor, older dogs have a higher incidence of bloat. Large Breeds can also have a congenital predisposition. So it's good question for breeder.
     
  8. spamvicious

    spamvicious PetForums Senior

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    I've had this the last couple of days, I absolutely adore Star but however much I thought I was prepared for her. I really wasn't ready for how much my life has changed. My anxiety (which I always suffer from) has skyrocketed and I've had moments of regret in getting her but I really hope this passes soon.
     
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  9. bullmastiff_mama

    bullmastiff_mama PetForums Newbie

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    I'm assuming by her age you've only had her for a few days. If that's the case, then it is completely normal to feel stressed. If you suffer from anxiety your feelings intensified, which again - I assume you know is normal. Anxiety has a way of complicating even what might be described as "normal" life situations, but add it to an already stressful situation and forget it - you just want to curl up into a ball and hide.

    The good news is that unless you've never ever had a dog, you will adjust to your new addition. As long as you are keeping her safe, fulfilling her basic needs and establishing a routine, you should both be fine.

    That said, if you continue to feel you're truly not ready for this now - most reputable breeders will take the dog back. There's absolutely no shame in returning her - if anything, it's the more responsible thing to do.

    Either way, don't bee too hard on yourself - and be patient. You will likely find that when the dust settles, whatever decision you made was the right one.

    Good luck.
     
  10. spamvicious

    spamvicious PetForums Senior

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    Thank you for your reply. I'm feeling better today, I think I'm expecting too much from her, I have to keep reminding myself that she's only a baby and that when she has accidents in the house it's not anything I'm doing wrong. These things take time, I'm working on a routine with her now. I'm still a little confused about some stuff but on the whole we're doing well. My anxiety is a little better, part of it is that my mum is going away on holiday for a week and I don't drive so I'm stressing that if anything goes wrong I'll be on my own and have no transport etc.
     
  11. bullmastiff_mama

    bullmastiff_mama PetForums Newbie

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    I'm glad you're feeling better today. You will feel more confident each day. When we got our first pup, we were told for potty training to simply bring them out after they play, after they eat and after they sleep, no exceptions. So if she naps for an hour or 15 mins. Take her out as soon as she wakes up. Also, pups can hold their pee one hour for every month of age. So two hours in her case. Maybe less since she's a small breed. Maybe you can have a friend visit while your mum is away. Keep your vet or breeder's number and so you can call with any questions. I was at the vet every week with our first dog because I was so nervous. Just tell them you're a new mum and they'll understand. I think you're on the right track to a rewarding experience and even when it's scary, just hold her and feel the warmth of her unconditional love. It will be worth it. :)
     
  12. Callum's Mum

    Callum's Mum PetForums Newbie

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    What a great thread. I'm reading this at stupid o'clock as my fur baby is up and about! She's a husky x gsd and is 16 weeks old. Both me and my husband are familiar with both breeds so knew what we were getting involved with.

    But for those thinking of getting a puppy, your life will not be your own any more. I get up once in the night to let Roxy out to pee and I'm now up early. I've had my strawberry plants massacred and she ate my son's sunflower he'd carefully nurtured from a seed.

    We don't get to go out all day as a family without doggy daycare so will have to factor in the additional cost.

    I've had to clean up poo at 3 in the morning and had my 6 year old son complaining that the puppy is annoying and he wants me to take her back (not happening).

    My hoover and washing machines are constantly being used and I've got a myriad of plug in air fresheners to take away the accident / disinfectant/fart smell.

    I'm self employed and I know my output has suffered due to the demands she puts on me (grooming, training and playing time during the day).

    But, she is lovely and we adore her. We all take her out for walks in all weathers and love her mad half hours when she rears around the house like a whirlwind, then collapses for a nap. I love the greeting I get when I go down to let her out in the night and I can't get enough cuddles from her. She has made our family complete and we would not be without her.
     
  13. FieryShihTzu

    FieryShihTzu PetForums Junior

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    This thread is useful and interesting. I think nothing prepares you for your first puppy. We brought ours home last friday night (5 nights ago), its been hard work and i know we have a long way to go. Just when i thought we were getting somewhere with the toliet training, he goes back to avoiding the pads and using the floor :( but i adore him already
     
    #533 FieryShihTzu, May 3, 2017
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
  14. Ralph

    Ralph PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone

    Sorry but I cant work out how to add a new post but needed some advice on getting a new collar (and ideally lead) for my dogs - Labrador and bulldog.

    Best I've seen is on amazon for Billy & Bella dog leads/collars - anyone bought this one - looks really nice? Any other favs?

    Thanks!
     
  15. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    If you can..get rid of the pads. Hes not doing anything wrong per se...you are training him to toilet in the house so he is. If that makes sense.

    So much easier if you can take him outside from the word go, as soon as he starts to go use a cue word of your choice, then lots of praise.

    Never leave doors open, as dogs will naturally toilet away from sleeping areas, and the garden is always the furthest away. So nice weather, people think toilet training is cracked as their little one is trotting out nicely, but no reinforcement. With no barrier ie door, no sense to hold either.

    Toilet training is hard work, that and training not to bite is tiresome to say the least. Taking a puppy out on waking, after play, after meals, drinking and waiting for them to toilet is time consuming, and watching them like a hawk for signs is never ending. However, well worth it in the end.
     
  16. FieryShihTzu

    FieryShihTzu PetForums Junior

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    Today he pooped and peed on the pad. We live in a flat (top floor) so running him down stairs when he's mid poo while training isn't ideal. Would probably end up with discomfort and many accidents in the close. We only got him last friday night, and have seen a lot of improvement he's already came out his shell.
     
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  17. benfalkner11

    benfalkner11 "Life will be more happy"

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    Yep. This is really correct.
     
  18. kennelmaid59

    kennelmaid59 PetForums Newbie

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    For years I've been looking for a place like this to vent my feelings about living with dogs and how our lives and relationships are affected by it. Perhaps it's just me but I would say if you're a couple and are thinking about getting a dog make sure that you agree on boundaries beforehand. I can't stress enough how important it is that you are completely honest with each other about this, otherwise resentment and frustration will inevitably follow. Examples: is the dog allowed on the sofa? on or in your bed? do you believe in giving your dog treats/rewards to stop them being a nuisance? is it okay to leave the dog on its own and for how long? are you happy to give up spontaneous nights or days out? can you give up, say, three hours of your time every day to take them out, on the same route, because it's the only place you can safely let them off the lead? do you both appreciate it's for the next fourteen years? will you stop at one dog or get a companion for them so that they won't be lonely if you have to go out for a couple of hours? do you enjoy being needed, followed around the house?
     
  19. cherylai9

    cherylai9 PetForums Newbie

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    The realities;

    Carpet cleaning required with a professional company / machine every few weeks until fully toilet trained
    Whining / howling during night for first week - fortnight if sleeping apart from family
    Lead training! - not all puppies take to the leash straight away... particularly when they are still toilet training because let's face it, it's safer to just do it in the house
    Fear of water - baths, puddles, rain.. you name it
    Walks - puppies cannot walk as far as a full grown dog but walks might last longer until your pup is used to walking on the leash
    Drooling on furniture / belongings - pups love to chew and with chewing comes drool.
    Chasing the kids - my daughter was petrified of my puppy who was obsessed with her toes, the bond comes eventually
    Hair, mud, and general mess from whatever the pup has found to chew on that day
     
  20. leashedForLife

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    bullmastiff_mama said,

    Agreed on the "raised" feeding/ drinking question.
    15 years ago they told us raised feeding, now do not raise.

    We still use raised (bowls), but are careful to control the other factors that can cause bloat.
    We feed small meals twice a day, no exercise or rough play for at least one hour before & especially after meals, no water gulping after meals or exercise, wet food can reduce risk (we still use dry). Slow down eating if necessary.
    Age is also a factor, older dogs have a higher incidence of bloat.

    Large Breeds can also have a congenital predisposition. So it's a good question for the breeder.

    ______________________________
    .
    .
    Any large breed, meaning 50# or more, not only Giants over 120#, is at higher risk than a smaller dog.
    A deep chest also increases the risk of bloat compared to any more-cylindrical torsos.
    Genetics has its own contribution over & above that; if any near-relative [parent, sibling, half-sib, grandparent, uncle / aunt / 1st cousin] had bloat or GDV, then the dog is again at higher risk.
    Environmental or management factors - which we can control - come next: how much food, wet or dry, how much activity before & after eating, speed of consumption, overheating / running / aerobic play plus massive water-intake while hot, etc.
    .
    to make this crystal-clear, let's look at an imaginary dog's risk. :)
    He's an Akita named Samurai - Sam for short. He's 4-YO so not a senior, active, in good body-condition [not fat, not scrawny, decent muscle, moderate BMI]. He gets regular exercise & at least half of it is aerobic, off-leash or within a fence - every day, unless the weather is unusually foul. He weighs 95#. He has a deep chest.
    His sire had GDV as a senior; his sire's brother had bloat as a 3-YO. No other near-relatives, so far as his owner knows, have had bloat or GDV.
    He doesn't gobble [thankfully]; he eats well-moistened dry kibble with some fish added, plus yogurt, probiotics, & seaweed [for iodine].
    He isn't fed for 2-hours post exercise, & waits an hour or more before any galloping or aerobic activity after eating. He eats 2X a day, about 12-hours apart. He's well hydrated with frequent drinks, vs spaced big-gulps.
    .

    His risks total:
    1 : over 50#
    1: deep chest
    1: dad, sr. GDV
    1: uncle, adult bloat


    that's a risk-factor of 4 - if he ate from raised bowls, his risk would climb to EIGHT, as eating from raised bowls doubles the risk of each individual factor.
    .
    his sister gobbles, & has all her life; even river-cobbles only slow her somewhat, she inhales every bit of food as fast as she reaches it.
    She eats dry kibble, with water alongside; she gulps a quart down after she eats, then lies down to digest her meal.
    Her risk factors thus total 7 - if she ate from raised bowls, it would be FOURTEEN.
    .
    Whether or not feeding from raised bowls is "logical" or a convenient height for them, has nothing to do with it; a 120# wolf in Alaska is not eating from raised bowls, tho they will gobble & sometimes quarrel over food [stress is an added risk factor, too]. Bloat is rare in wild canids. If it happens there, they die - period; dead animals may not have had the chance to sire or whelp pups.
    The data tell us that raised bowls = double every risk factor for that individual. it's a decision only owners can make, but having used raised bowls & had . my Akita have GDV at only 7-MO, & then after the fact saw the research, i would never used raised bowls unless it was medically necessary.
    [i-e, a senior dog with severe cervical arthritis who won't eat due to pain, from a bowl on the floor - or a dog diagnosed with megaesophagus, who vomits if he eats in any position but VERTICAL & requires a feeding chair.]
    .
    this is the original study -
    Non-dietary risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus in large and giant breed dogs
    LT Glickman, NW Glickman… - Journal of the …, 2000 - Am Vet Med Assoc
    ... Funded in part by grants from the Morris Animal Foundation, the American Kennel Club Canine
    Health Foundation, and ...
    Factor dogs (95% CI) (95% CI) P value dogs (95% CI) (95% CI) P value ...
    Weight of dog at 4 months Below average 62 18 (–2–38) 0.78 (0.24–2.51) 1.00 44 35 ...

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