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Thinking about breeding from your Bitch?

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by petforum, Jul 5, 2008.


  1. TillyBunny

    TillyBunny PetForums Newbie

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    Maybe he's mating with her to make sure that he's the sire, like they would in the wild.
    Has she shown any signs of being pregnant??? or any of miscarrage???
    You should take her to the vet and check they will tell you if shes pregnant and then you will know why you're stud's acting up. :)
     
  2. jacksandbo

    jacksandbo PetForums Newbie

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    thank goodness i saw this thread.

    We were thinking of breeding our Cockerpoo Bo, lots of people have said they would like one of her pups and we also would of liked one of her pups, but i did not consider the risk to Bo and i would not risk her health for anything.
     
  3. vic2410

    vic2410 PetForums Newbie

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    i have two americanbull dogs, my male will mount on to the female he will
    start slow then go fast so i know hea doing it right but they only go for
    about 2 min maybe less, and they are not tieing can she still catch on.
     
  4. vic2410

    vic2410 PetForums Newbie

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    no shes not, this is her sceond heat now she showing the signs he mounts her but just dose not tie with her, she also walks around when hes trying
     
  5. dexter

    dexter PetForums VIP

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    she's probably not ready then ;)
     
  6. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    Possibly - but bitches can be ready and they will still walk away - this (not aimed at you Dexter) is the reason why dogs should be held and managed during a mating.

    If you do get a tie and one or both dogs panic - they could both do themselves some serious injuries (including death)
     
  7. peterscot423

    peterscot423 Banned

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    Before breeding the Bitch we have more carefully about the dog breed and we have also certified that the dog does not suffer from any infection.
     
  8. Kyo

    Kyo PetForums Junior

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    A lot of the articles i read from different websites and answers to peoples questions on different forums are scare tactics. I feel that instead of replying to someone wishing to breed with 101 ways your dog could die, actually talking them through the process kindly would allow them to have their eyes opened to the complicated process of breeding and not make some people just turn away from all advice because they are scared of being shouted at or reprimanded for not doing thing's correctly.
    Many people will ignore advice that is commanded to them like they are silly children who couldn't possibly know what they're doing, and this will result in more dogs deaths than a kind hand helping along the way.
    I read all these articles and did find some interesting points, so thank you for the thread.
     
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    The conception and birth of my litter of 6 went well, and the first has gone to his new home now. The other pups are gorgeous and I'm keeping 2.

    I'm glad I did it, I now have these perfect pups, but NEVER, EVER again! I'm just so knackered.

    So I'd add to the things you should have in place; a partner to share the load. As a single person, self employed, who has had to work at the same time as having the pups (though reduced hours), my life has become a constant round of feeding/cleaning up after/play session - then they sleep and I go to work for 2-3 hours, come back, clean up (sometimes they've stayed clean), let them out, play with them, feed, back to work, come home, feed, clean up, cook something for myself if I have time (bowl of cereal if I don't), walk the mum and my other dog (who have been coming to work with me during weaning). It's bloody hard work. I knew it was going to be, but didn't foresee just how tired I'd be. It's been amazing at the same time, watching them grow and all the changes in them.
     
  10. Bichonfrisefamily

    Bichonfrisefamily PetForums Newbie

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    Our Bichon Frise had an allergic reaction when she lived with a Chinese Crested Powder Puff, namely a lot of itching. A blood test at the time showed allergy to mites. When that dog left our home, the allergy disappeared. Should we refrain from breeding her? :confused:
     
  11. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Have you read this whole thread from the beginning ? I'm not sure if allergies in themselves contra-indicate breeding but there are plenty of other factors that would.
    Read up about the required genetic testing for Bichon Frise, consider your reason for breeding , the only real valid one is to better the breed. There are numerous puppy farms churning out Bichon Frise and various 'designer' cross breeds, do we need any more ?
    But first things first , read the whole thread from the beginning.
     
  12. Bichonfrisefamily

    Bichonfrisefamily PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for the guidance.
    We have thought to breed her with another breed, to widen the gene pool, for example with a lagotto. But the allergy question is the main question for us, even having considered the many good points raised in the thread.
     
  13. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    In that case I would suggest that you start a new thread , it will have more impact and you should get answers for people more knowledgable about allergies in breeding.
     
  14. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    No, I would not breed from a dog that suffered allergies. There are health tests, but they are not enough alone, the whole health of the dog should be looked at.
    There would be no benefit in breeding cross breeds - you would not be widening the gene pool but regardless, it would be irresponsible to breed from a bitch which is known to have a health issue that is likely to be passed down to the puppies and allergies is one of those. Just enjoy her.
     
  15. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    So you want to cross a gun dog breed with a toy breed :confused:

    Beyond your need to widen the gene pool why these two particular breeds?
    What does each breed bring to the table to help improve what is already here?
     
    lovemybabies likes this.
  16. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Yes, you should refrain from breeding a dog with a health defect that can be passed to the offspring.
     
    lovemybabies likes this.
  17. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Yes, some allergies can be passed down to the pups.

    It's not a risk I would want to take.
     
  18. Colette

    Colette PetForums VIP

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    Given that certain breeds have a high incidence of allergies, there certainly seems to be a genetic link, so breeding from a dog with allergies wouldn't be recommended. Especially given that bichons are fairly numerous, there is no need to breed from one with potential problems.

    Our first bichon suffered from extensive allergies. The result was chewing her paws until they bled, antibiotics, antihistamines, special diet, a course of expensive immunotherapy and around 2 years wearing a lampshade collar almost constantly. NOT something any dog or owner should have to go through.

    I personally would only consider a bichon suitable for breeding if they were allergy free, eye tested clear, and patella tested as a bare minimum. Testing for legg perthes and hip scoring would be preferable too.
     
  19. caroleduffin

    caroleduffin PetForums Member

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    Playing devils advocate here, why do people breed puppies? Not for cash, if you read the posts on here. I only ask because my friend has recently had a litter of labradoodles from her bitch. I was surrogate minder when my friend had to leave them on the odd occasion. I was staggered at the work involved. They were 5 or 6 weeks old. I was exhausted at the end of the day! Feeding them, bringing them in from outside pen when it turned cold, cleaning up after them, putting them into spare pen to wash floor etc etc! I had had some vague thoughts about breeding gorgeous little pups and sitting watching them play. All thoughts gone! Then comes the vetting of the prospective buyers, letting them go. Definitely cured me of any romantic ideas. Why do people do it, especially a cross breed. Lovely though they are, establishing a blood line or going to Crufts doesn't come into it. So why?
     
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  20. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Very often, for money.
     
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