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The importance of hand signals

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Fleur, May 13, 2010.


  1. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    Poor Zipper is very confused.

    I've got Laryngitis and haven't been able to speak for 2 days :(

    I always use "OK" as a release command - but at the moment I can't say it :rolleyes:

    Poor boy sat by his dinner for 3 minutes with me madly waving at it and whispering OK :eek:

    I think I need to introduce some hand signals :lol:
     
  2. lifeizsweet

    lifeizsweet PetForums VIP

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    Bramble only knows how to lay down through hand signals. Not sure why, we always said 'down' as well, but he only responds to the hand sign.
     
  3. lifeizsweet

    lifeizsweet PetForums VIP

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    Also hope you feel better soon!!!
     
  4. sequeena

    sequeena PetForums VIP

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    Oh bless him!! And bless you laryngitis is a cow!!!

    Sky knows a few hand commands, a click and hand to left or right directs her whichever way, stop is the usual hand out sign :D Luna is so daft she just looks at me when I signal to her lol
     
  5. HoneyFern

    HoneyFern PetForums VIP

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    Aw bless! I hadn't thought of that before - although Bailey responds to hand signals for most things we've never introduced a 'go on then' signal.
     
  6. rona

    rona Guest

    Hand signals are handy when your dog starts to go deaf as well ;)
    Rest of the family are happy though Fleur? :lol: :lol:
     
  7. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    Good point - I'd never really bothered with hand signals, but think I might start introducing some.

    I'm Ok letting them off lead because I've always (and I don't know why) patted the side of my leg when I've called them and I've now learned they respond to this with out me calling their names :thumbup:

    Yep family are really happy :lol:
     
  8. MerlinsMum

    MerlinsMum PetForums VIP

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    Ooh Fleur I hope your throat gets better soon.

    I'd not thought of that either - however, maybe you might be able to achieve something via 'lure & reward' - it's amazing what a dog will do when you have a piece of chicken in your hand ;)
     
  9. CarolineH

    CarolineH PetForums VIP

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    I have always taught body signals alongside verbal cues. They are especially useful when controlling a dog at a distance on a windy day or where there is a lot of background noise. I use hand signals plus 'body' ones, eg; dipping my head towards my chest means to come, dropping my left shoulder and looking down at that side means to come round to heel. I also use both arms open wide to recall. Just something I have always done. :cool:

    Dogs do follow body language an awful lot more than we realise and although they do not see us as other dogs (they know the difference!) they do get to learn our language, probably a lot more frequently than we bother to learn theirs!
     
  10. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    I'm sure there are lots of 'signals' my dogs have learned from my body language with out me noticing :lol:
    My 2 seem to be following what I want with out me talking - it's just the please can we have our dinner now? that I feel sorry for them.
     
  11. shazalhasa

    shazalhasa PetForums VIP

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    Some of mine know a few hand signals but not many. I use them for lay down, wait, up on back legs and best of all going to bed :D thats a new one, I saw it on Cesar Millan and thought I have just got to try that and was chuffed when it worked almost immediately :lol:

    I'd love to teach them more... will have to get my thinking cap on ;)
     
  12. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    Going to beds easy - just turn out the lights ;) - and both of mine go straight to bed :)
     
  13. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    diva responds better to hand signals too!
    akai well he only responds if you got a biscuit, typical fat puppy! :lol:
     
  14. Petitepuppet

    Petitepuppet PetForums VIP

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    My young dog is deaf since birth so she only get hand signals and my old dog is going deaf so kinda glad she was there when dora was learning them:).
     
  15. Jasper's Bloke

    Jasper's Bloke PetForums VIP

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    I taught Jasper hand signals at the same time as verbal cues although not on purpose, the hand signals are left over from the luring process. I have noticed though that he responds to hand signals much more consistently than voice commands, which is probably because a hand signal is more consistent than the human voice.

    He is also very attentive to other cues, for example, when I am getting ready to go out he reacts differently depending on which shoes I put on. I I put my walking boots on he trots between the door and the drawer containing his lead because he knows he is going out, if I put my trainers on he knows I am just popping out to the shop or to take the kids to school so he will go and sit in his crate. If I put my work boots on he will go and settle down at my wifes feet and watch me go.

    Dogs are much smarter than they let us think they are.
     
  16. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    I think your right there :thumbup:
    I've been very impressed how my dogs read my body language - I'm noticing it more because I've lost my voice.

    Mine will get very excited when I put on my wellies or trainers cause they know that means walkies.
     
  17. theevos5

    theevos5 PetForums VIP

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    my 11 yr old has taught Alfie to sit,lie down and roll over in a sequence by clicking fingers for sit,moving finger to a downward position and then finger round in a circle.Didn't know he had done it until saw him the other day,was well impressed with how quick Alfie had picked it up.Mind you he has got him jumping through his hula hoop as well,:) I am now waiting patiently for him to teach him to get the poo bags and pick it up himself:lol:
     
  18. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    I trained hand signals to both my dogs from day one, alongside verbal cues. I've tried giving opposing commands like this, as an experiment (like hand signal for stay, say 'come') and the hand signal seems to take precedence with them, they give that more weight. At agility, body cues definitely direct the dog more effectively than words. At feeding time, I put the bowls down say OK to each dog and point to the bowl at the same time. If I don't point at the bowl, they hesitate and don't start to eat. I've tried saying O (but not K) and pointing to the bowl, again they are a bit confused but will eat more readily. Same just saying K (but not O).
    I started training hand signals because I'd read somewhere that dogs understand them on a more instinctual level than how they earn words. Makes sense, when you think how they communicate with each other. It certainly helps on windy days, in noisy situations and at distance. And of course the dog is likely to go deaf if it lives a long life, it's much easier to
    train signals while the dog is young and can hear as well.
     
  19. Jasper's Bloke

    Jasper's Bloke PetForums VIP

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    I can see how hand signals could be easier for a dog to understand as our voices are always changing, tone, volume and inflection are all difficult to repeat consistently and will always be very different from person to person. A hand signal is a clear message that cannot be mistaken for something else no matter who gives the command.

    Mmm, must teach more hand signals!
     
  20. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    Buster knows hand signals along with voice commands it's easier I think for them to learn from hand signals than voice commands
     
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