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Teenage dog stories

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by AmyRedd, Apr 1, 2017.


  1. AmyRedd

    AmyRedd PetForums Senior

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    This is more just a thread to cheer me up rather than asking for help... hopefully nobody will mind!

    Ted is lovely dog in no way do I regret getting him and he's definitely a character but omg such hard work at the moment. I should probably start with his good qualities haha he's wonderful in the car, wonderful with the cats, loves everyone, never growled at anyone outside of play, walks well on the lead most of the time, been house trained since he was 4 months, not yappy, never chewed anything that wasn't his and can be left in the house loose for 4 hours and nothing will be damaged etc.

    But he's also totally hyper around other dogs to the point of embarrassment still! He's been like this since we got him at 3 months...maybe because he was left with his siblings till then without much socialisation. Despite everything he still can't so much as see another dog without turning into a bouncing loony kangaroo (no barking or growling). I can't walk him with any of my friends dogs because he just acts as though we're not there. Won't recall, not interested in treats or toys just the other dog and that's it.

    He's been to puppy classes and was really well behaved and now he's in novice classes and he's fine there too. Last week I dare say he was the best behaved, no fixating on the other dogs and did everything he was asked to do. I've been using the same methods out and about (literally every walk is a training walk armed with clickers, squeezey cheese, long line etc) but feel like I'm not getting anywhere! He's 8 months so I'm hoping maybe it's just an age thing and one day all this training will suddenly kick in?! Obviously he's a terrier and I'm not expecting him to suddenly morph into mr biddable but just a little focus would be nice. He's my first true dog (I lived with my boyfriends old German shepherd till we lost him last year) so maybe I'm just expecting too much but I swear I'm surrounded by people who literally do nothing with their dogs and they're still so well behaved!

    Basically just wanted vent so sorry if you've just read through all that! I was hoping there might be the odd person who can relate. Also I know I'm going to get told to neuter him but I'd rather leave it till he's at least 1. I don't see his problems as being related to him being intact as he's been the same since he was very young.
     
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  2. leashedForLife

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    OK - let's conduct a simple experiment. :)
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    get Ted chemically-castrated with an injectable that will wear off; aside from that, continue as before.
    If anything changes -- for the worse, or for the better -- do please let us know? - Thanks in advance,
    - terry
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  3. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    Haha apart from my Yorkie who was born sensible, all mine have been little sods from when they hit the teenage phase until they grew up a bit. With Bo it was 7 months bang on, complete lunatic, crap recall, bogging off, destructive, barking, chasing, generally a right cow. From what I remember she calmed down a lot at around 2+ years of age in the house, but was still a handful out and about.

    Then there was Juno who was a perfect princess until she was about 11 months, then became a teenager. She's 18 months now and flits between being a little angel and being a bitch :Hilarious
     
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  4. bogdog

    bogdog PetForums Senior

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    I don't see how castration (of any kind) will turn his attention on you from all those things that he finds more exciting than you.

    I had a dog with similar issues, I did manage to train him. He was never castrated. It's not always testosterone that causes problems.

    Many experienced dog owners on here who can point you in the right direction.
     
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  5. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    If your puppy has been hyper from the start then that is simply who he is ....Mister Happy. You are doing all the right training and you are keeping it up outside the classroom ...well done. Yes, it may seem that some people have super well behaved dogs without much work ...lucky them .....most of us have to work at it and wait until they grow up a little :D

    I would give him activities on the walk that do not involve other dogs ...maybe scenting or game playing or fun training so that he gradually begins to see you as far more interesting than everyone else! It's how i help mine focus when they're young.

    As he has been over playful from the day you got him then it is unlikely the behaviour is fuelled by the arrival of Testosterone although remember, like all teenagers, he is having a real surge of the stuff right now which (just like teenage boys) can make concentrating hard lol Work though it with him ......

    J
     
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  6. AmyRedd

    AmyRedd PetForums Senior

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    I added the part about neutering because I knew you would comment first on this haha. I honestly don't see how it would change him. He doesn't hump or mark in the house. He doesn't even mark excessively outside. He's met a bitch in season and acted the same around her as with any other dog... I might consider it if he suddenly becomes overly humpy or marks a lot but not until he's at least a year old.
    As you always quote papers...
    http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/9227747
    Effects of castration on problem behaviors in male dogs with reference to age and duration of behavior.
    This one indicates only a 50% reduction in behaviours not related to humping or marking in only <35% of dogs after castration.... not enough to warrant neutering in my opinion.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com.ezproxy.mmu.ac.uk/science/article/pii/S0167587715300544
    Effects of surgical and chemical sterilization on the behavior of free-roaming male dogs in Puerto Natales, Chile
    This one found no difference in the behaviour of chemically and surgically altered dogs other than increased aggression...

    Thank you @labradrk! I know what you mean about the flitting! On thursday I took him for a jog (not really a proper one as I have an injured knee and he's only young) and he was perfect, trotted alongside me, didn't pull or try to sniff everything, met loads of dogs and didn't overreact other than a little boucyness. Then yesterday I took him to the pub and he was nightmare dog again!

    @bogdog Thank you... that gives me a little hope. I know my boyfriends German shep was a nightmare for years but he was always intact too and was very well behaved by the time I met him.

    @Jamesgoeswalkies Thank you.... makes me feel better that I'm on the right track with him. He is definitely Mr Happy.... so wiggly and full of it haha. I think I sometimes feel like I've failed somewhere in his training and I studied Wildlife biology at uni so everyone seems to equate that to me having some kind of magical animal powers which clearly is not the case when they meet my dog haha! I'd like to try scenting with him as I think he'd enjoy it but not sure where to start!
     
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  7. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Start at home. Introduce a word that means there is something hidden that he must fine ( I use 'Find It'). To do this you can 'hide' a treat (somewhere simple) and encourage him to 'Find it'. Or you can use the 'Find It' command by holding your closed hands out and getting him to find which one has the treat in. Once he has cottoned on that there is a favourite toy or yummy food at the end of this hunt, then you can gradually make it more complicated. Under pots, round corners, in another room ...and of course in the garden. Keep it simple and don't play for too long lest he gets bored.

    We then play these games on a walk ...finding everything from toys placed in long grass to piles of kibble in a number of strategic places ....where you go from there depends on your dog. Our Labs find and retrieve so we use an object. Our little dogs find and 'flush' so they prefer a treat. Endless variations. Endless fun. :D

    J
     
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  8. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    Get yourself the book When pigs fly by Jane Killion. :)
     
    #8 StormyThai, Apr 1, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2017
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  9. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Isla's favourite trick when thwarted over anything was to jump up and grab the lead and pull. Usually it was over things like 'I want to go this way, not that way', 'I want to say hello to that dog why wouldn't you let me' or 'you left me with HIM (my husband) for a minute, don't like that, you have to stay with me all the time'. If I tried to turn away and ignore her she just got worse and this was usually when there were at least half a dozen people sat around all watching.:rolleyes: So I would get her to go and find something that she knew the word for such as a stick or a seat (we will often find a seat to sit on when out on walks and I would send her off to find a seat where I knew one was near by). This seemed to take mind off having a go at me and we could continue our walk.
     
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  10. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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  11. bogdog

    bogdog PetForums Senior

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    But, according to one review, the author recommends physical punishment....
     
  12. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    Not sure where the reviewer read that...it is a book talking mostly about shaping with a clicker and getting focus from unbiddable breeds :confused:
     
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  13. bogdog

    bogdog PetForums Senior

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    Yep, verified Amazon purchase, review dated 12 January this year states that she advocates pinching the dog's ear until it picks up a dumbbell. I was about to buy the book but that review stopped me.
     
  14. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Clearly they have written a comment without bothering to read the book in its entirety.

    As such, they have taken what Killion has written, out of context.

    Check out point 4 http://www.whenpigsflydogtraining.com/extra/consequencesrev.pdf Its an EXAMPLE, not a training suggestion.
     
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  15. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    I have the book and have just flicked through it again because I don't recall that at all.
    They are talking out of their arse ;)
     
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  16. AmyRedd

    AmyRedd PetForums Senior

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    Ted went through this phase! He was so annoying my boyfriend refused to walk him. He also used to get zoomies on the lead and run in circles with his bum tucked... luckily he grew out of those two things haha. Maybe I need to start giving him more jobs to do on walks other than paying attention to me as that's probably quite boring haha

    Thanks @StormyThai. That review put me off buying it as well but it sounds like someone hasn't read the book properly so I'll give it a go.
     
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  17. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    It really is a brilliant resource...I have read it a couple of times but still find myself referring back to it when needed :)
     
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  18. leashedForLife

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    @AmyRedd -
    no, i didn't "automatically suggest neutering"; i suggested U perform a simple, reversible EXPERIMENT to see if desex would help.
    :)
    Nothing complex about it - inject, & it either makes a change [better, worse] or it does nothing whatever. // Good luck, in any case. Cheers.
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  19. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    'Find it' is a great game to get young dogs started on more complicated training. It focuses them on you and they have to use their brains to work out what you want them to do. Plus they get a treat so they tend to really enjoy it.
     
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  20. sesmo

    sesmo PetForums Senior

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    OP, I have the same issue as you, but it's not all dogs. As an example, this morning I went to cheer my sister on at a 10km run. Lots of people with the same idea as me, take the dog, see the runners off, go for a mooch then get back to the finish. He paid no attention to Pointers, Labs, JRT's, a Bedlington or a scruffy hairy mongrel. He turned into a complete lunging fool in front of a Malamute (I think), a border terrier and a couple of elderly greyhounds. None of the dogs he lunged at had done anything that could be perceived as "bad doggy manners." It's just Obie, being Obie. I always have treats and have trained a "look at me" cue so that I can get his attention off other dogs and on me. When he looks, he gets a treat. It's not perfect as he still occasionally lunges but it's far better than it was.

    PS- we still get the zoomies on the lead. Obie is now 18 months old. I don't like it, especially near roads, but the chance of treats usually stops it.
     
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