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Tatty cat!

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Jenny383, Sep 18, 2013.


  1. Jenny383

    Jenny383 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,
    Looking for some advice really.
    I have an 18 year old rescue cat (had him 2 years) and he's not grooming himself so well now and developing knots. I brush him twice a week but he hates this and bites me so can't do it for too long. I don't feel like I'm getting on top of the knots and general scruffiness.

    Anyone got any ideas how I can get his coat under control bearing in mind he's a grumpy 18 year old fella when he's being brushed who cares not that he's getting scruffy!

    Any ideas really welcomed as I'm concerned the knots will become a problem eventually.

    Thank you!!
     
  2. Tracy Lou

    Tracy Lou PetForums Member

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    If he's long hair, may be do a little every day and give him a treat after, so he start to think of it as a nice thing to happen.
    I may be wrong but I believe the longer the cat's hair the more often you have to brush them, so if you take the little and often approach then it may help.
    Also has he been checked by the vets as he may have an underlying reason why he's not grooming as much. when our candy was not feeling to good, she cut down on her self grooming. Hope it helps :)
     
  3. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I've got a semi long haired cat who has always liked being brushed but now he's getting on a bit, he develops more knots, especially on his underside which is where he won't let me go. I have a little gadget with a blade on and when he's relaxed I use this to "saw" off his knots though you have to be careful not to get too close to the skin, its better and safer than using scissors. I do also find that the food you give makes a huge difference to the quality of their coat as some of the cheaper ones leave it greasy. You could try a grooming glove which won't be so harsh as a brush. I think the alternative is to get the vets to do it.
     
  4. Jenny383

    Jenny383 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your comments!

    He's short haired and he is fed on Royal Canin dried food.

    It's a recent thing that he isn't grooming himself so well and my grooming him twice a week doesn't seem to be making much of an impact! Although it has got rid of some of the knots. I bought a fur monster brush and this is pulling out tons of dead hair but takes a lot to work the developing knots out.

    What sort of blade do you use Charity? That sounds like a good idea as he's a bit wriggly and bitey to get scissors near him.

    Thanks again for your advice.
     
  5. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Have you tried a slicker brush? My old boney cat tolerated it well, as did a shorthair cat with a very thick coat I had who tended to develop matting. As said above, little and often and finishing with a treat will help.
     
  6. Jenny383

    Jenny383 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks - I'll look up slicker brush on amazon. I have two brushes - a one with metal prongs and a furminator. I also have tried a small comb which wasn't too bad.

    The neighbours will be thinking he's neglected! Poor fella he used to have such a beautiful coat.
     
  7. wicket

    wicket PetForums VIP

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    Ah this thread brought tears to my eyes - Tatty Cat was the name of my elderly ginger rescue on my signature, sadly now at the rainbow bridge. As OS says try a slicker they are very gentle - I would ditch the furminater, I bought one a while back but feel they are extremely harsh.
     
  8. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    I meant to add - has he had a vet check? Older cats can get thyroid problems which are usually very treatable, and he may have pain from joint issues and whilst the joint issues can't be treated the pain can be relieved.
     
  9. Jenny383

    Jenny383 PetForums Newbie

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    Ah wicket, that's a lovely pic of your tatty cat.
    My last cat, stomper, was 21 when she went - I'll never forget her.

    The furminator is harsh you're right but it doesn't half pull out a good amount of hair! He doesn't like it much though so have to keep use to minimum.

    He's a worry! Doesn't help that he is very much an outdoor cat and will only grace us with his company in the evening. I have to literally carry him in when its raining - he'd stay out (and get even scruffier in the rain!).
     
  10. Jiskefet

    Jiskefet Slave to the Hairy Hikers

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    Your Tatty Cat sounds like a real character.
    Could we have some pictures, please, I's love to see him.

    Old cats tend to get less agile, andit will be more difficult for them to reach any of the more awkward places. He may have developed arthrosis, too, which can be very painful and will make him very stiff. (Talking from experience here, both with respect to some of my previous old cats and myself). If his joints are less stiff and painful, he may be more able and willing to clean and groom himself.

    Glucosamine and chondroitin may alleviate the symptoms, so it may be worthwhile to check with your vet if he does indeed have arthrosis and get advice as to giving him glucosamine. Best have him checked for thyroid and kidney function as well, as they are common problems with old cats.

    Will he eat wet food? If so, it would be better to feed him that. If he doesn't like to eat just wet food, you might at least try to get him to eat some in addition to the dry.
     
  11. Jenny383

    Jenny383 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks Jiskofet,

    I am going to get him checked out by the vet just in case. We were advised by the vet not to give him wet food as that was the reason he said that Gregory's teeth were all rotten and had to come out. He does however get meat most days - some chicken or fish etc at tea time.

    I love tatty cat as a name btw.
     
  12. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    Could I suggest you change from the Royal Canin food. I used to give that to mine, both wet and dry, but I went onto other wet foods which had a higher meat content and Lilys Kitchen/Encore dry and the improvement in Mouse's coat was really good within a couple of weeks. Though I can't get to underneath because when I try he just sits down flat so I can't do anything, the rest of his coat gets much less tangled and is a lot softer. I wouldn't use a comb as this tends to pull the skin when its matted.
    The knot remover thingy is called Mikki Matt Splitter, I think I got it at Pets at Home. This is what it looks like.
     

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  13. cookiemom

    cookiemom PetForums Senior

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    Omega 3 fish oil is wonderful for the coat, you can get it in any supermarket these days, look in the health section, just Omega 3 not any of the mixes and not cold liver oil. You can split a capsule and add to food or he may lick it straight from the plate, every other day or third day is a good starting point, too much too quickly can cause loose stool so I'd start there and if he can tolerate then daily for a while, you should start to see an improvement in coat quality pretty quickly, also may help with joint issues.
     
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