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Tamaskan Dog

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Nonnie, Aug 17, 2009.


  1. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Im confused, how are these any different to the NI?
    They look almost identical.

    tamaskan-dog.co.uk
     
  2. Molly's Mum

    Molly's Mum PetForums VIP

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    "The wolf dog without the wolf" ........ I am confused:eek:ut::eek:ut:
     
  3. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    I think that means a dog that looks like a wolf, but created without breeding with a wolf. I thought that was what the NI was.
     
  4. Molly's Mum

    Molly's Mum PetForums VIP

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    I've never heard of 'Tamaskan' before and having looked at the website I can't see any difference from the NI like you said, maybe they preferred a posher name lol.
     
  5. Natik

    Natik PetForums VIP

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    The history of the tamaskan dog :D

    The first dogs to start the ball rolling, leading to the Tamaskan Dogs of today, came over from America in the 80’s. These 5 dogs were imported into UK and described as husky type dogs – origins unknown.
    These dogs were then bred to Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky and German Shepherd crosses – origins unknown - with the idea in mind of creating a dog that resembled the wolf but with a good temperament, thus being suitable as a family dog, foremost with working ability.

    In the early days, through selective breeding by a couple of people, these dogs were mated to perhaps pure Siberian Huskies or first generation crossbreeds. A couple of German Shepherds were also used and Alaskan Malamute. But after that, they were selectively bred to each other over a few years trying to create this wolf look-a-like. (Up until this time, no one is 100% certain of the breeding programmes, as no records were made available) . Eventually given the name wolf-dog, in approximately 1988 the name changed to Northern Inuit (NI) as there was no wolf content, and the wolf-dog name was misleading. As a result, a Northern Inuit Society was formed. However, differences in opinions subsequently arose on how the breed was developing, leading to a split and a new Society being started. With two NI Societies, and the breed going in two directions, one Society decided to change the name of the breed to the Utonagan to disassociate itself with the NI, thereby forming The Utonagan Society. The new Utonagan was now starting to look quite different from the NI, but was still not looking wolf-like enough, although temperaments of all of these dogs were exemplary. After a short while, there was yet again another split due to differences of opinions, and, the subsequent formation of a new Society known as The British & International Utonagan Society, headed by the then-President of the original Utonagan Society along with some of their members. The original Utonagan Society then ceased to exist until some time much later when it was resurrected by a new committee.

    Meanwhile The British & International Utonagan Society continued to selectively breed and improve type, keeping all records of matings, health issues, etc., starting a hip scoring and eye testing scheme, setting rules and regulations, a code of ethics and providing breeder’s contracts. Eventually these dogs started to look different than the dogs being bred by The (original) Utonagan Society.

    Sadly, the original breeders kept inaccurate records in the breed’s beginnings, and matings had taken place between closely related dogs, resulting in some health issues creeping into the breed which were not discovered until much later. What was now needed was a new injection of healthy, unrelated bloodlines, which led to a search for new dogs with the look and working ability necessary, but not losing the temperament of the dog.

    The search for other wolfy looking dogs with similar ancestry led to Lapland where dogs of a very similar appearance were being bred for sled pulling in extreme temperatures. These dogs’ close ancestors were also some of the best sled racing dogs in the world and would enhance the breed’s future working ability. After some negotiations with kennel owners, a female was purchased and imported into the UK, with an additional six dogs booked for import from the same kennels.

    With a collection of new bloodlines now organized, it was time to think about the future. So, it was decided after much debate by the committee members of the British & International Society to close down the Society, as the old (original) Utonagan Society had just been resurrected with a new committee who did not wish to follow the standards of The British and International Utonagan Society or include new bloodlines in their breeding program. Therefore, it seemed obvious that the present Utonagan would soon not resemble the ‘new’ dogs whatsoever and they would need a new name.

    The foundation stock consisted of the original female imported from Finland which was taken back to Finland along with 7 selected dogs from the Blustag Kennels of UK (and also 4 selected dogs from UK and 2 in USA, all from the Blustag Kennel). The reserved six dogs were then collected from Lapland. Out of these, two were exported to UK an adult male and female from different litters. Two other foundation dogs were added in 2006.

    It was February 2006 that The Tamaskan Dog Register was formed. Tamaska means ‘Mighty Wolf’ in North American Indian language.
    The Tamaskan Dog Register, formed by the original committee members of the The British and International Utonagan Society (and two members from as far back as the Northern Inuit Society), is now the Governing Body for all Tamaskan dogs throughout the world. Since forming in early 2006, the Tamaskan Dog Society of Great Britain and the National Tamaskan Club of America have also been created, Euro Tamaskan was formed in 2009

    Tamaskan Dogs have been exported from Finland to Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Greece, Germany, France, Sweden and USA.

    The Tamaskan has a very bright future and must NOT be confused with the Utonagan, whose standard is somewhat different, the main differences being the depth of stop, shape of head, length of coat and the Utonagan’s acceptance of a wide range of colors and markings. With many additional small differences, the Tamaskan is in all a different breed which can be clearly seen by comparing pictures from the Tamaskan Gallery with those found on The Utonagan Society Gallery.

    Please note that the Tamaskan dog has no wolf content whatsoever.
     
  6. LostGirl

    LostGirl PetForums VIP

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    To be honest they are all breed from the same breeds of dogs so genetically i doubt there is much differences

    The Tamaskan looks slightly heavier and boarder then a NI but smaller and leaner then a utonagan. from what ive seen in pics as i only been lucky enough to see NI in real life
     
  7. IHG

    IHG PetForums Newbie

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    Can open........worms everywhere!!!
     
  8. clueless

    clueless Banned

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    There was alot of controversy re this so called breed a few years ago. Seemingly one minute a Breeder had Ute's then within weeks they magically had Tamaskins LOL

    : Lynn and her daughter Jennie (Blufawn) purchase their first breeding dogs from Utonagan and Northern Inuit stock

    Looks like a cross
     
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