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Super charged PUP

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by bear dog, Jun 24, 2010.


  1. bear dog

    bear dog PetForums Newbie

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    Hi to all!!

    We have a 12 week old Caucasian Sheepdog boy, although he is a great dog, and seems to be extremely switched on. He has a dark side. We have had lots of dogs over the years, but the problem is not being a breeder or a professional on the training side, we only get to go through this puppy stage every 7 to 10 years or so, and have forgotten how many behave. So we have the pup, who has very high protean food as he needs the energy due to his growth rate, as he will end up something like 70 to 80KG or more, a monster dog, Russian Bear dog as some call them.

    When he is in his play pen area which is about 6ft 6in by about 7ft which is really our entrance porch he amuses himself for hours, sleeps and everything else, but he can watch what’s going on in the kitchen due to the baby gate we have put in. Ok, no problems. But, as soon as he get out or we let him out so we can spend some time with him, he quickly ends up in hyper mood, no wind up’s, to start him off, so thats not it, he starts his mouth going chew, chew, bite, jumps up, bites, chews, and more chews, you get the picture. This little guy is super charged, could be due to the food in part, not sure, but he is FULL ON! And of course after about 5 to 10 mins, we get so ramped up or tired of his constant on the go, attacking everything on site, wires, anything he can get his mouth around, we have to put him back in his pen area. We walk him, he goes out for toilet about 10 times a day, and on top of this we have him out for some interaction about 3 or 4 times a day for about 5 to 10 mins at a time. But we do feel sad for him as we feel he spends too much time in there on his own. 1 to 2 hours. At a hit. He does not complain and seems 75 to 80% of the time reasonably happy. I can’t recall, from our other dogs, if it was as bad with them or not, some friends say it’s sort of normal, a stage they go through, which will pass within the next 2 or 3 months or so. I hope so. He is going to be an outside dog when he is a little bigger. But that does not mean he will not be allowed in the house at all. After all these are very big, tough, mountain dogs. But we are also, extending our outer porch for him, which will double up as a kennel for him. This means we can leave the back door always open, and he will have about 3.7meters and 1.7meters wide den for him to sleep and rest in with his blankets. The winters can get very harsh here, sometimes down to -25c but these dog are quite at home in these sorts of temperatures. We are just trying to cement a good relationship with him, but due to his hyper charged behaviour we are finding it difficult to have some quality time with him. He is very good on the lead, almost trained him to walk to heel already. Let him go in the house, and it’s mental time.:scared:
    Would be nice, if he could just lay still for 5 mins now and again, and have a nice stroke.

    Any feed back would be interesting. Or anything else or info I have left out let us know.
     
    #1 bear dog, Jun 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  2. sue&harvey

    sue&harvey PetForums VIP

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    Hi, We had this problem with Harvey. We had a baby gate in the kitchen area, then when he came out hyper or what. How about using a house line or teather him to you. When he gets ott put him in his area for time out, then when he is calm he comes out again. No talking, completly ignore him, when you place him in time out. The longer he spends in his are the more exciting yours is... so you need to just ride it out. It took about 3 days for "our area" to become as interesting as "his". With a teather or house line you can stop him frying himself on the wires or chewing antique furnature. Try and ignore the bad behaviour and reward the good... heavily.

    Hope this helps :)
     
  3. ploddingon

    ploddingon PetForums Senior

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    I am not a doggy expert so may be way off beam here, but I wonder if you have answered your own question here.

    It sounds, from what you are saying that apart from going for a pee, a walk, and about 40 minutes interaction with you he is in his own enclosure, seperated from you.

    If that is the case, it is no wonder, when he does come out of his pen, that he goes a bit hyper!

    I dont know this type of dog, but do know with my small dog, if he had this regime he too would be 'hyper' too.

    I would suggest that you have a bit of a rethink about how you are planning your dogs day. Spend more time with him doing structured things - obedience training, playing, etc, and for longer periods. You may find then that he starts to settle down a bit.
     
    #3 ploddingon, Jun 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  4. bear dog

    bear dog PetForums Newbie

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    Ummm. You know, I think you are all on the right track here, well spotted, the comments make sense to me, thanks, will work on this using the ideas in these comments, good constructive Critique. will let you know how things progress. :thumbup:

    But very sad to say, he may have to wait a day or two, as I feel completely CRAP, with a very, very bad cold. It's nice when I feel sorry for myself, hahahahah not really.. Poor old me...................
     
    #4 bear dog, Jun 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  5. sue&harvey

    sue&harvey PetForums VIP

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    All the more reason to have a cute fluffy pup to cuddle :thumbup: Hope you feel better soon, and the little lad settles. :)
     
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