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Sudden Wetting In The House

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by crosscairn, May 19, 2010.


  1. crosscairn

    crosscairn PetForums Junior

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    Hello

    I rescued a cairn westie cross two weeks ago. He is six months old and I am his third owner!

    His first owner was an elderly lady who took ill and wasnt able to look after him so she gave him up. His second owner only had him for three weeks and took him back because of his nipping & toilet training. Basically he wont go when he's out for a walk (number one or two), but he waited until he got back in the house and did it indoors. I have learnt to take him straight out the back when he gets back from a walk and it causes no problems.

    Up until now, I havent had any problems with him at all. He never had an accident in the house and he always waited to go outside. The past few days he has frequently wet (and only wet) indoors. Four times today - three this evening alone.

    I work during the day but come home at lunch to let him out. The accidents havent occured in the morning, only in the afternoon and evening. He is alone for the same amount of time in the afternoon as the morning, so its not like he has to wait any longer. When I let him out the back after a walk, he's out there for a good while, but he always wets within a few minutes of coming indoors. I dont make him come in. I leave the door open and he settles down of his own choosing. He doesnt even get anxious and run to the back door like he used to. He just stops what he is doing then pee's.

    I'm just concerned about this sudden change in toilet behaviour and is there anything I can do to stop it?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. PleasantPupZ

    PleasantPupZ PetForums Newbie

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    I have found out that many people get this problem shortly after they bring a new dog to a home the first few days or weeks the dog issettling in and adusting to their new life generally every thing looks smooth and great then little thigs like this crops up old habbits they may of got into in a previous home start to show them selves such as toileting issues.

    Firstly with many things that come out of the blue it could be worth getting him checked out by a vet to rule out infetions, if all ok then the best way to rectify the problem is go back to basics and start toilet training as if he had never been taughtdo not put paper on floor as this encourages toileting indoors. a great routine that works is putting him out after every meal and drink, when a pup drinks they generally need a wee shortly after and as its showing in the afternoons more this could be due to pup drinking more as the day gets warmer so even though your out the same legnth of time in the afternoon he is proberly having more to drink due to the temerature rising through the day. It may help if you crate the puppy while out as this will calm the pup and is less likely to wet his bed, or to get some one to pop in a couple of times in the afternoon to let him out.

    going back to the routine always let hiim out after any snooze, any drink and any meal, praise and reward pup for correct toileting, pick up and take out side if he starts infront of you and egnore pup if he does but you dont catch him in process. Once a dog urinates in the house that first mistake can encourage them to do in the same place over and over again due to the underlying smell that you may not smell but he can and many disinfectants do not remove, biological wash powder or a good odour elliminater carpet wash will remove such a smell and reduce the possability
     
  3. lucysnewmum

    lucysnewmum PetForums Senior

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    great advice from PleasantPupz (nice of you to join us at last!).
    also...if pup does have an accident a bit of bicarb of soda and lemon juice in water is a cheap way of getting rid of the smell.
     
  4. crosscairn

    crosscairn PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for your replies.

    We had a more successfull day yesterday, no accidents at all! I am not sure what was the matter with him for those few days. Thanks also for the bicarb and lemon tip, I had never heard of that before!

    Thanks again
     
  5. leashedForLife

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    i wouldn;t be using a homemade clean-up for pet-waste -
    we all know dogs have incredible noses, that WE do not smell it is zero assurance that THEY - the dogs - do not.

    any trace of urine or stool is a || Pee / Poop here || sign for the dog.
    i would use the enzyme-based cleaners designed for the purpose - and a UV light, hand-held,
    to ensure that i found them ALL. turn off the lights, roam the house with a black-light, sweeping carefully while STANDING;
    use a flash to walk about, U don;t want to fall. LABEL all the fluorescing areas - they are bio-waste.

    i would also ACCOMPANY every trip outside, not leave the door open; so that i could see if he actually voids, How Much,
    How often, any straining?, any blood / pink urine, etc.

    if hes INTACT i;d get him neutered ASAP - he is 6-MO; theres no reason to delay; hes a toy-dog, his long-bones have stopped growth.
    entire-Ms are far more inclined to leg-lift when stressed or feeling challenged - which includes the mere SIGHT of another dog passing by outdoors, on leash - that for a dog, constitutes a virtual invasion; not physical, but emotionally threatening + very disturbing.


    happy B-Mod - for U and the dog :thumbup: no more solo potty-trips, is my suggestion ;)
    --- terry
     
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