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Strange new behaviour

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Allie, Mar 27, 2011.


  1. Allie

    Allie PetForums Newbie

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    My 1-year-old female Jack Russell has started a new strange behaviour over the last couple of days. When I sit on the sofa, she jumps up and "hugs" my arm with her front legs, just as if she were a male dog mounting me. She has this really intense look on her face when she does it. What does it mean? Why does she do that? I've never seen her do this before. (Just FYI, if it's relevant, she's spayed). I'm baffled. :confused:
     
  2. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Didn't want to read and run but i've not had this myself although I do have a jr mix but he doesn't do it either, then he's only 11 weeks old.

    If you don't like her doing this, as it does sound like mounting, you should say "no" and place her on the floor every time she does it. She may start to do it to visitors and they may not like it.

    She'll soon learn that mounting gets her put on the floor - clever little dogs jr's are and she won't want to sitting on the floor while you're on the sofa I bet! ;)
     
  3. Allie

    Allie PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks Malmum!

    I've finally had some time and I've googled it also - it seems it can be an indicator of many things, from asserting dominance to stress to an invitation to play... not very helpful. I'll take your advice, Malmum, and see if it stops!
     
  4. kaisa624

    kaisa624 PetForums VIP

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    Our Holly humps my teddies and has a favourite penguin to hump. We don't mind it, as it's only teddies, but if it progressed to kids/adults, we'd give her a teddy again.

    Maybe allow her to hump teddies (ones she knows are hers which are big enough) rather than your legs.
     
  5. CarrieH

    CarrieH PetForums Member

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    Could she still be hormonal after being spayed? Just wondering if the timing might coincide with when she would presumably be having her first season if she wasn't spayed.
     
  6. Chihuahua Clothes Mikey

    Chihuahua Clothes Mikey PetForums Newbie

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    Like you said, it could be triggered by her being anxious about something OR her wanting to play, but either way, her standing up with her paws on someone like that indicates that she views herself as owning that person/dog... you, in this case. It's a sign of a mind that views itself as the dominant one in your relationship.

    If you don't want it to continue, just push her off, or do Malmum's "no" thing... :001_smile:
     
  7. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Teach an alternative behaviour, that's incompatible with hugging your arm, and require it eg) lie down. Pushing a dog away is futile, it will misinterpret it and likely become more excited playing with you. That then tends to lead to anger & frustration at the dog, and escalating physical force and punishments of a totally non-comprehending dog.

    Then teach "Up!" allowing a jump up on you, as a fun reward. If you have it on cue, and an "Off!" understood to, you'll be able to manage it better.

    I wouldn't use that solution with a male dog, as he may become obsessed with the humping behaviour, and practice it all the more.

    I think it's far more likely that the dog is simply a bit bored and wants to do something, than that the theory of Dog-Human Dominance has anything useful to say about this.

    As for the point about visitors, again teach & reward polite greeting behaviours! Then you can be proud of your calm "well trained polite" dog, rather than looking like a harpie, calling "No!" and acting cross in front of them.
     
    #7 RobD-BCactive, Mar 30, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  8. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    You do sometimes get a bitch that will go through a hormonal phase when she would have been in season if she had not been spayed. Just a thought.
     
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