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Springer Spaniel Constantly biting

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by cpl_13, Dec 20, 2020.


  1. cpl_13

    cpl_13 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all,

    I am completely new to this forum. I’m looking for some advice regarding my Springer spaniel. She is 8 months old and since 8 weeks she has been a biter. Back then we just put it down to her age and her teething so did all that was asked of us by puppy training. We soon thought we had turned a corner, however recently she has resorted back to her ways! We cannot sit on the sofa without her biting our arms, hands, feet and now lunging at our faces! (This is new and something I want to stop immediately) she doesn’t show aggression as such, however when we tell her no or stop she then starts to bite the sofa/coffee table and basically anything that is in her way! Almost like she is having a tantrum for us telling her off! I’ve tried all the things the previous trainer told me to do but this just isn’t working and I don’t know what on earth might be causing this behaviour! She is so good on walks on and off the lead, she does trail and recently has become more distracted by birds/rabbits ect however she is brilliant with other dogs I just think maybe she really isn’t a dog to be a pet and maybe she needs to be working she hasn’t yet had a season and I’ve been told when she is spayed this may help but to be honest I feel I’m loosing a battle here! Any advice or similar experiences would be very appreciated!!!
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    Spaying will only help if the issue is hormone-based and I suspect it’s not. When you say you’ve done what the trainer told you, what is/was that? What do you do when she starts biting? What’s your reaction? Telling her ‘no’ isn’t likely to help because dogs don’t really understand the concept if ‘no’. It’s just a noise you make, unless she’s been trained to associate something with it. It’s better to direct her to do something preferable. However, I suspect it’s a bit more involved than that.
    How much exercise and mental stimulation does she get? Spaniels are ‘busy’ dogs and do often need to be given something to do. It could be frustration/boredom, but a bit more info would be helpful.
     
  3. cpl_13

    cpl_13 PetForums Newbie

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    I’ve been to behavioural training with a specialised gun dog trainer using positive reward based training so I don’t just use “no” and that’s it. We have a set routine throughout the day, use distractions such as focusing her attention to toys and not our arms/legs/face ect when she is playing up, rewards when her behaviour is good, all is what I have been asked to do. Worked very well at the beginning but now seems she isn’t responding to anything like it. She has 2-3 long walks per day (30 - 45 mins/1hr) but I’m cautious of her age so try not to over do it and at home I have plenty of stimulation for her but she will loose interest and become distracted very quickly reverting back to wanting our attention (which is when she is biting and it’s almost like she is growling at us but I haven’t yet worked out if this is her wanting to play or be aggressive)
     
  4. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    OK, so when she does try and bite what is/was your reaction? What do you do when she starts biting? What did you do to stop her biting as a pup?
     
  5. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    I dont know if im missing something here - but is this not a simple case of the dog not understanding the house rules and getting very frustrated?

    You say the dog is great outside - so this problem is just in your house?

    Id be doing some place training so that your dog knows that his place is on a mat on the floor. Not on the sofa.

    Build up a lot of value for your mats. You can have one in every room and use training games to make the mats fun.

    But basically, once your dog understands that his 'job' is to stay settled on his mat, he will be clear as to what you want him to do.


    3 long walks are not necessary. You need to be playing your gundog games with your retrieves and building steadiness but be really tight with your training criteria so that your dog knows what he should be doing at any time.

    Once your rules and boundaries are in place (and these can all be trained through games which will provide mental stimulation) frustration will decrease and you will have a dog that knows when to settle and when to play.

    Switch the drive on. And off.

    Obvs your dog needs exercise and sniffs, but one longer walk with training built in plus a couple of short toile walks will suffice - you will get more out of your dog simply by practising your training when out, rather than just walking.
     
    Sarah H and Ian246 like this.
  6. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    The OP seems to have disappeared since Sunday. :(
     
  7. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    He/she popped in yesterday so they could still be checking for replies whilst logged out.

    You never know. . . .
     
  8. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    Aaaaah...you are wise in the workings of the forum... :)
     
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  9. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    :Hilarious:Hilarious:Hilarious:Hilarious

    Ha ha a very quick witted response @Ian246 - just the kind of quick wit that amuses me! Thank you:)
     
  10. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    :Shy
     
  11. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    Your first reply made me laugh - that latest one has just left me :confused: confused!!
     
  12. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    I will just add - in case the OP does come back that training doesnt need to take massive chunks of your day. If you get into a good habit of doing 5 mins here and there, it just becomes 2nd nature and totally melts their brains.

    Example: i got up to make a brew 10 mins ago and up pops my very energetic and busy dog, tilly.

    I just happened to have a chunk of cheese in my pocket (as you do!) I threw out the cheese, commanded her to 'go' and then just as she got to it i had her sit, then down. She was staring hard at the cheese and i just had her hold a few seconds before saying 'get it'

    I did 2 or 3 more til the cheese was gone.

    Made my brew,

    Came back to this:


    20201223_171318.jpg


    3 or 4 mins of brain work equals 2 hrs walking!!!!



    That is an advanced exercise and my dog is 3.5 yrs old but just shows how getting in that 'ad break' training habit pays dividends for a settled dog.
     
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