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Spaying before a first season at 6 months

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Cuddypuppy, Jul 21, 2009.


  1. Jazzy

    Jazzy PetForums VIP

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    I think the RSPCA spay very young puppies because someone near me has a five month old puppy that she has had a few months and she had already been spayed when she got her from the RSPCA in Manchester.:(
     
  2. Jazzy

    Jazzy PetForums VIP

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    Yes I can vouch for that. My Bichon was neutered at 7 months after a lot of pressure from the vet and he now is very attractive to male dogs which makes it hard when you are trying to walk and all these male dogs are making a nuisance of themselves. We had to cut short a walk the other night because of the unwanted attention of another male dog that would not leave him alone and the owner never bothered to come and get it.:mad:
     
  3. Cuddypuppy

    Cuddypuppy PetForums Member

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    Yes, there seems to be lots of conflicting advice out there. I think though, that I may follow the advice of my vet and get Nelly done at 6 months.
     
  4. Jazzy

    Jazzy PetForums VIP

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    I'm still debating what to do with our pup but I think I might wait until she's had a season or two first as our other Bichon is neutered.
     
  5. TillynMe

    TillynMe PetForums Junior

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    My vet also advised me to spay at 6 months before Tillys first season. I took this advise and had her spayed at 6 months and a week. She was fine and recovered well. I did look into it but found that there was a great deal of conflicting advise. In the end i decided to follow the advise of my vet.
     
  6. Cuddypuppy

    Cuddypuppy PetForums Member

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    At the end of the day, the vets have spent an awful long time qualifying and are more medically trained than human doctors, so I think I agree.
     
  7. reddogs

    reddogs PetForums Senior

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    It seems to be a trendy thing to spay early and is really being pushed by younger vets.

    I would not spay until after the first season and then would always spay if there was no intention of breeding, a dog would need to be a little older so he had reached maturity.

    The 6 mths is a bit sweeping as an awful lot of dogs aren't mature until 18mths - 2 years.

    By all means follow your vets advice but be certain that this is what you want and that you haven't been pressurised in to it.
     
  8. ec77865

    ec77865 PetForums Newbie

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    My dog was spayed at 6 months, and she is totally fine. She has medical issues, but those can't be traced to the spaying, only the poor quality breeding she came from. The only thing that happened was she got a lot more mellow.
     
  9. LostGirl

    LostGirl PetForums VIP

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    zeb will be as close to 2yrs as we can get him. Hes nearly 8months and isnt showing any signs of being a monkey still havin is jingle berries. I want him to mature and grow to his full potential before i do anything

    with a bitch i would i guess waiting between 2-3rd season depending on breed
     
  10. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    Zink's study is flawed and I'm not even going to comment on Rawlinson.

    Sanbourn's paper is better than Zink's, although not perfect. Early spay/neuter has several advantages over traditional age s/n. Late s/n also offers some advanatges over traditional age s/n.
     
  11. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

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    Thats exactly what i was adviced to do i wouldnt have it done any earlier. Dont know when it will be molly was 1 last sunday and hasnt had her first season yet.
     
  12. Kinski

    Kinski PetForums VIP

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    How, keep it simple please :p.

    Terri
     
  13. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    Zink's paper is an overview to several independent studies. Unfortunately Zink does not use the studies well or, imo, honestly. For example she cites aspects of studies that suggests negative effects of early s/n but fails to cite positive effects in the self-same studies. She misquotes some studies and she also mischaracterises some arguments against neutering as being arguments against early neutering.

    Howe's rebuttal, below, is not perfect but gives a starting point.

    http://www.columbusdogconnection.com/Documents/PedRebuttal .pdf
     
  14. Kinski

    Kinski PetForums VIP

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    Thank you. I've bookmarked it and I'll read it tomorrow.

    Terri
     
  15. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    but isnt that true of any study. They all prove what they set out to prove. I rather think in this case I would rather go by anecdotal evidence, which is that it is definitely detrimental to spay or castrate too young.
     
  16. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    No, there's lots of honest research out there but sorting the wheat from the chaff is quite a labour and, to a degree, beyond the capabilities of laymen like me.

    There is a special danger with all papers that review a body of literature that the evidence has been cherry-picked, misrepresented or misquoted. It is illuminating in these cases to look at the source material.

    In this instance Zink and Howe disagree on what the source material actually says and some of that source material is not available on-line, some is available but only with a subscription but some is freely available and this we can all reference and see for ourselves who is right. For example Zink and Howe differ over their interpretation of the study by Spain et al 2004.

    I suggest that those with an interest read what Zink says about Spain, then read what Howe says about Spain, then read Spain and decide who's talking gonadectomy and who's just talking gonads. :)

    Long-term risks and benefits of early-age gonadectomy in dogs, Spain et al, 2004

    Anecdotal evidence is pretty poor. In some parts of the world it will even validate witchcraft. Scientific method - it's got us to where we are today.

    ETA: It's also worth considering that all of these studies and papers look exclusively at the veterinary case and exclude the social case. If we suggest neutering to the owners of an intact dog on the basis that it prevents accidental litters we will often get the response from the owners that he/she is responsible enough to ensure that that doesn't happen. However if we were to revisit these owners a year later we would find that a number of them had had accidental litters nonetheless. When we mentally divide the world into responsible and irresponsible owners we all take care to place ourselves into the responsible bracket (sometimes in the face of all rationality).
     
    #36 Johnderondon, Jul 22, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2009
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