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Spayed cat still acting unaltered

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Bexcats, Jun 13, 2017.


  1. Bexcats

    Bexcats PetForums Newbie

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    Hi folks, I'm really hoping someone has some experience with this sort of thing...

    I have a 12 year old cat, and her two 10 year old daughters, all spayed. They have been spayed for 8-9 years. Since her spaying, the mother cat has been quite miserable. While she loves human (my) attention, she does not tolerate the other two anywhere near her, and hisses at them when they are close. She attracts the neighborhood cats, and they have their singing standoffs. From what I can tell, the cats that come and visit are toms. Sierra does not have sex with these cats, nor does she appear to go into heat, but she seems to defend her territory, and also marks it by spraying. I believe that this isn't a typical behavior of altered female cats. The other two don't spray at all, don't seem to attract the guys, and are quite personable, and at least tolerant of each other.

    I think it could be due to a botched (incomplete) spay, but I'm wondering what other options, or possibly solutions, might be. She seems very hormonal and a little confused with life, and I feel sorry for her. I'm hoping to find out what I can before a vet visit, as she is very healthy otherwise.

    TIA for your feedback! :)
     
    #1 Bexcats, Jun 13, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2017
  2. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    In spayed dogs and cats, there is something called Ovarian remnant syndrome, this is caused by some ovarian tissue or remnants being left behind when they are spayed. If this remaining ovarian tissue is still capable of producing hormones (which is can be) then spayed dogs or cats can still show symptoms and behaviours or dogs and cats that are still entire and have seasons. There are blood tests in dogs and I assume cats too to check for ovarian remnant syndrome. The only other thing that I can think of that can cause increases in oestradiol hormone even in spayed animals is an adrenal gland issue of some sort.
     
  3. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    All of this can be quite normal without an ovarian remains. Not all female cats like their adult kittens around, and neutered cats will still defend territory and spray as part of doing that. I don't think she's hormonal but I agree she probably isn't very happy. Unfortunately all I can think of to improve her quality of life is to rehome her as an only cat.
     
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  4. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I agree with Oriental Slave, @Bexcats, your mum cat sounds miserable because she is having to share her home with her two adult daughters. As OS says not all female cats like having their grown up kittens around. Grown-up kittens are competitors for resources.

    I have had spayed female cats who have been very territorial and sprayed. One of my previous spayed females, a petite little girl, used to spray copious amounts of urine in a big arc all over the shrubs in my garden. Quite a feat to behold! Glad to say she never sprayed in the house!

    You have two social groups of cats in your home, one group is the two daughter cats, and the other 'group' is the mum cat (in a group on her own). The two groups do not get on because there is too much competition for resources.

    You can try increasing the resources in your home massively, so the mum cat sees there are more than plenty to go round. Resources are water bowls, litter trays, scratch posts, cat beds, high up places to sit and observe, as cats like to do. Also hidey hole igloo beds on the floor tucked behind chairs.

    Food is, of course, a major resource to a cat and mum cat should have her own feeding station well out of sight of the other two cats. Do not allow any sharing of food bowls and if necessary buy mum cat her own microchip feeder so her food is always safe.

    Ideally mum cat should have her own cat flap to outside whilst the 2 daughters share another cat flap.

    If mum cat is no happier with increased resources then you'd need to think of dividing the house into two with a physical barrier, and letting the daughters live in one half and the mum cat in the other half. They can time share the garden - or may be OK outdoors together providing they have their own defined quarters in the house.

    The alternative is to home either the mum cat or the two daughter cats.
     
    Calvine likes this.
  5. cows573

    cows573 PetForums Senior

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    I have had females that were neutered and did spray on occasion and did appear to come in heat and attract all the neighbourhood strays! One in particular, used to come into the house soaked at the back end with, well, I guess you can work it out!

    I don't think simply not liking her daughters would make her miserable as such. Many cats don't like each other, merely tolerate each other and I think this is perfectly normal. She is obviously happy with you, enjoys your attention and, while being allowed outdoors, hasn't decided with her feet by leaving you...

    This situation, from what you have said, has been going on for 8 or 9 years... I would have said that rehoming her at this stage in her life would be very stressful. I presume the spraying (in the house?) is the real issue? If so, I'm not sure what you can do except bring her to the vet's to eliminate any potential health issues that may be causing this.
     
  6. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @cows573 - I disagree, cats who don't want to share their home with other cats, especially with their own adult offspring, can become distressed, anxious or withdrawn and depressed. It is one of the major causes of stress in a multicat household..

    Some cats simply prefer to live as an only cat and will never be happy if they have to share.

    Not all unhappy cats vote with their feet. Some with a strong sense of territory stay put, probably in the hopes the other cat(s) will leave. Or maybe they don't have the confidence to leave home, and think the 'devil they know is better than the devil they don't'.
     
    #6 chillminx, Jun 13, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2017
  7. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    You can massively increase the resources in your house without it necessarily helping the situation. :(. Worth a try but don't hold your breath.
     
  8. Bexcats

    Bexcats PetForums Newbie

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    I just got home and read all these replies. Thank you all so much for taking the time to respond! I will be back tomorrow to comment and probe some more. I see this is a UK site. It is the only cat forum on which I have posted, that has actually produced results. I'm in Canada, but English by birth (emigrated at 5 years old). Yay Brits! Thanks again. More soon... :)
     
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  9. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I agree @OrientalSlave - increasing resources 'after the event' doesn't always resolve things. But worth a try. :)
     
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