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Sparrow with leg injury

Discussion in 'Bird Health and Nutrition' started by Turonis, May 3, 2019.


  1. Turonis

    Turonis PetForums Newbie

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    H everyone, this is my first post here. I've been searching a lot about this and I couldn't find any answers. I hope this forum will be able to help.
    Last November I rescued and nursed two sparrow nestlings, a male and a female. The male had a few nutrition issues which delayed his feather growth, but besides that I had no other issues with them until now. More or less a week and a half ago I noticed a bruise on the female's left leg and a reddish swelling; I thought she had hurt herself somewhere inside the cage by accident, applied some antiseptic and then waited. When the bruise disappeared I noticed that the two scales that were above it were gone - her skin was completely flat, and then on the next day another very similar bruise appeared on this very same leg (and the swallowing wasn't gone) and another bruise appeared on her right leg, near the "heel". I applied antiseptic again.
    She hadn't shown any behavioral changes: she is doing the same things in the same way she ever did.
    What could be the cause of this?
    Thank you in advance.

    I've attached pictures I managed to take from the first bruise (which is now gone). The second one appeared just below where this one was.
     

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    #1 Turonis, May 3, 2019
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
  2. Turonis

    Turonis PetForums Newbie

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    I just noticed she was pecking her legs, probably the injuries were self inflicted.
     
  3. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Should they be released if they are healthy?

    We had to hand rear 2 blackbirds when kids took them from the nest but once they were fully grown and able to fend for themselves they were given access to outside and eventually ventured out into the big wide World to live a natural life.

    This is an excerpt from the relevant Wildlife & Countryside Act:

    It is legal to keep native birds in captivity if they have been bred in captivity from lawfully captive parents, but the responsibility rests with the owner to prove this if challenged”

    To me, this implies it’s not legal to keep a wild bird in captivity unless it were disabled perhaps or with special permission?
     
    lullabydream likes this.
  4. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    This, my uncle worked in conjunction a bit with RSPCA and the RSPB?!?! He would care for wild birds that needed looking after, respite so to speak so he had things like sparrows, blackbirds which were usually overnight cases and then hawks and owls, in the interim for animal hospital sanctuaries which were further afield. No idea how it came about but they would be he wasn't keeping them as pets, and certainly the aim is to release.

    In the UK, wildlife is treated for free at the vets, as long as care as given on site or was. No idea if laws have now changed.

    I think this bird really needs looking over if the injuries are self injuries then that's usually a sign of stress. Which just proves wildlife even little birds such as sparrows don't flourish in our homes as pets.

    The vets should be able to offer advice to get help for these birds, however birds do get stressed easily especially ones from the wild. Which can have severe consequences. A savvy vet would notice.

    To be honest, as most homes even with huge aviaries can't replicate the wild for these birds, and it depends how tame and how savvy they would now be to cope with surviving outdoors that euthanasia might be the kindest thing. However, it might not it's just one of those things that happen unfortunately with wildlife. They aren't domesticated to live a stress free life with human confines that it can be the kindest option.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
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