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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I am new to this forum but just wanted to ask other dog owners for advice. I have a 14 week old BC. This is my second dog, my first was a BC x with Springer S - a complete nutter which is what made me opt for the BC second time around. My problem is he is incredibly good and it's making me worry that it can only go down hill from here on in. He settles down when I leave him to go to work, he heels off the lead and is never more then 10 meters from me, he sits when told, he leaves items when told and he always brings back the frisbee when we play in the park. The only thing I could possibly criticise him on his his toilet accidents in the house but I think this is more due to the fact we are in a second floor flat and when he needs to go it doesn't leave me much time to get down stairs. Does any one else have experience of this? Am I worrying unnecessarily that when he hits the teenage years it's all going to fall apart. He is naturally shy by nature and I really have to force him to go for walks, but we do go even if I have to carry him to the park. We are going to our first puppy training class next week. Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Hi
I am new to this forum but just wanted to ask other dog owners for advice. I have a 14 week old BC. This is my second dog, my first was a BC x with Springer S - a complete nutter which is what made me opt for the BC second time around. My problem is he is incredibly good and it's making me worry that it can only go down hill from here on in. He settles down when I leave him to go to work, he heels off the lead and is never more then 10 meters from me, he sits when told, he leaves items when told and he always brings back the frisbee when we play in the park. The only thing I could possibly criticise him on his his toilet accidents in the house but I think this is more due to the fact we are in a second floor flat and when he needs to go it doesn't leave me much time to get down stairs. Does any one else have experience of this? Am I worrying unnecessarily that when he hits the teenage years it's all going to fall apart. He is naturally shy by nature and I really have to force him to go for walks, but we do go even if I have to carry him to the park. We are going to our first puppy training class next week. Any advice would be much appreciated.
Some pups are just that bit easier then others, my second was a doddle to the first really so he may continue to be a relatively easier dog then your other one was.

Pups though in general are usually more dependant and eager to please and come adolsecence they can go through a change where they are not so eager to please and dependant and will push boundaries, not listen to commands so much and start to not recalling so much so its possible he may change during this phase.

Best thing is to enssure that they have a really good foundation training and routine in place as pups that makes the phase if it comes easier, and then ensure that you keep on top of the socialisation and training even more so if they do enter the sometimes difficult stage.

Try not to push him too much forcing them to do things can cause ongoing problems, just try to give him the time and patience to get his bearings and build confidence. This may help its a puppy socilisation plan at the end of the breeders and early care givers there is plans to download and follow.
The Puppy Plan

If he is a nervous unsure little chap he will need slow steady introductions to things a little at a time. Flooding them with all too much at once can have detrimental effects later on, if they are given more then they can cope with all at once. Border Collies can be sensitive to things as well and it can be easy to cause problems later on.

Regarding the toilet training you need to get him out frequently and in good time, they dont always recognise the need to go or realise too late. I usually take mine out every 30/45 minutes when younger and at first, when they start to go I use a word of choice, used every time they associate the word with toileting so later once learned you can use it as a toilet cue, when finished lots of praise and treats. They usually need to go too after drinking, eating, play and sleeping. Also looks out for circling, sniffing and scratching at the floor its often a sign they are looking for somewhere to go, so get him out quick. Sometimes you dont see it until a bit later as when younger as said they dont recognise the need to go or realise too late. At first they do have limited capacity to hold large amounts for long periods, but as they grow and get more control they dont need to go so frequently.
 

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Sounds like you have a lovely little pup!

Don't fret to much about what might come, some dogs never really go through the teenage stage and are just naturally well behaved.

The best thing you can do is keep on top of his training. Sometimes we owners get lax when our dogs are doing really well. Its easy to feel like you don't have to do any more when you've no problems but its important to continue challenging and praising your dog.

Your little lad is a BC so try teaching some new behaviors and provide interactive toys to keep his mind occupied. BC's seem to get into the most trouble when they have nothing to do ;)

You say that you have to force him out for walks, how does he act before going outside? Is he fearful of the stairs, the elevator, the lead or just going outside? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He just sits down and won't move but as he doesn't like to be more than 10 meters away from me if I go down the stairs and say bye bye he'll follow. Once we are in the park he runs around and seems to enjoy himself but generally he is afraid of most things. The first walk of the day is always the worst. He hates the lead and is happy just to follow me even in big open spaces where there are lots of people and other dogs. I have to force him to come down the stairs to go for a toilet break but he's always fine when outside and I give him lots of praise and a treat for going.

When we first got him at 9 weeks he had a real problem with submissive peeing so I wonder if it is in his nature to just be timid? I am just surprised by his behaviour especially as he is a BC.
 

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He just sits down and won't move but as he doesn't like to be more than 10 meters away from me if I go down the stairs and say bye bye he'll follow. Once we are in the park he runs around and seems to enjoy himself but generally he is afraid of most things. The first walk of the day is always the worst. He hates the lead and is happy just to follow me even in big open spaces where there are lots of people and other dogs. I have to force him to come down the stairs to go for a toilet break but he's always fine when outside and I give him lots of praise and a treat for going.

When we first got him at 9 weeks he had a real problem with submissive peeing so I wonder if it is in his nature to just be timid? I am just surprised by his behaviour especially as he is a BC.
Genetically BC's can often be nervous/fearful/timid with careful socialisation and habituation you can go some way to counteracting this. Its no fun living your life being worried, I don't know if you have had a chance to look at the link Sled dog has given you for the puppy plan, but I'm sure it would help your pup if you follow it.
We find play a valuable tool in building confidence and self esteem in worried dogs, I will get you a link for a play article my other half has written it may help. http://workingtrialsworld.co.uk/play school.html
 
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