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singleton puppy :(

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by boxertam, Nov 15, 2012.


  1. boxertam

    boxertam PetForums Newbie

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    hi all, new to this forum, i have a 4 year old boxer called maisie she was mated on the 3rd of october with another boxer, i booked her a vet appointment on the 31st (28 days after mating), Took her to the vets and she started to feel her and said that she thought she could feel something, she then proceded to scan her and came back 5 minutes later and said that she and a colleague thought they could see a few pups but she didnt thing she was as far on as 4 weeks and asked if i could bring her back in 2 weeks time to clarify if she was indeed pregnant or if she may have a infection in her womb as they are prone to them after there heat cycles. so yesterday i took her back for her next scan the vet began feeling her and said he couldnt feel anything and he didnt think she was pregnant, he then proceded with a scan and came back to tell me she was indeed pregnant but he could only see one pup and said not to quote him but there could be more, i asked about an xray and he said it wouldnt be worth doing??? he then proceded to tell me what signs to look out for i e detached placenta, fluid bag and straining without producing a pup,he aslo told me not to over feed her as the pup could grow to large to pass through the pelvis and that was it i was sent on my way! i feel he has left out alot of valuable information and i didnt have100% confidence in him in the first place as it was a different vet (from the same practice) than seen her at the first appointment, i came home and started to research firstly i found out that a sheep scanner has a better machiene and they from what i have read are better to go to for a scan in the first place, i found a scanner in west lothian and booked her in and she was scanned lastnight, he also told me there was only one pup. from what i started reading, there are numbers of compications from not producing enough hormones to trigger labour, and not enough hormones to produce milk , they can be oversized and not pass naturally atall so the big question is does anyone on here have a boxer that this has happend to should i go see another vet and get a xray to measure the size of the scull and the size of her pelvis ?? to ensure i dont loss the pup and most importantly my dog, i have read over the post on here about the little rottweiller pup that sadly passed away and she was also a singleton :( any help would be much appreciated thanks tam.
     
    #1 boxertam, Nov 15, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2012
  2. paddyjulie

    paddyjulie PetForums VIP

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    I can't answer any of your questions, but just wanted to say that my lad Chester was a singleton puppy and he was delivered by cesarean..after that he and mother were both fine .

    so..good luck .
     
  3. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Only thing I can think of is gestation is around 62/63 days if I remember rightly.
    So I would suggest you speak to the vet about checking her nearer the time.
    If he thinks there may be a problem then maybe consider an elected cesar.

    I dont breed but have a friend who is a very good breeder, I know a lot of breeders dont rely on temperature taking, but she always has, which in fact actually saved one of her bitches and pups. Often signs of labour is that when its imminent the bitch may stop eating and nesting, usually the body temperature also drops from the normal 100 - 102 degress to 99 degrees or lower. usually they enter the first stage of labour about 24 hours after this.
    In my friends case she didnt start the first stages of labour and just sat there doing nothing, and it turned out she had uterine inertia was taken to the vets and had a cesar and mum and pups were fine but wouldnt have been otherwise.
    So if the vet showed you if you dont know already how to take a temperature then maybe thats another suggestion perhaps as a double check of a warning something might be up.

    Dont now if this is your first litter but the following may help, its an easy check list from considering breeding whelping right the way through without tons of reading but also has other suggested reading.
    http://www.akc.org/breeders/resources/guide_to_breeding_your_dog/pdf/guide_to_breeding_your_dog.pdf

    Another good quick reference list is 6 common whelping and post whelping problems
    The 6 most common problems during and post whelping (canine pregnancy)

    Another good book that Ive seen highly reccomended on here too is the book of the bitch that may help too.

    Apologies if this isnt your first litter and you know this all already, but if it is it may help.
     
  4. SharonM

    SharonM PetForums Member

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    My Flora was a singleton, vet told us to let her get to day 63 from 1st mating, and if labour hadn't started then to take her in for a c-section. We did this and Flora was born weighing 1lb 2oz - which is pretty big for a cocker spaniel, especially as mum isn't a very big girl herself, there was no way she would have passed this pup on her own.
     
  5. bensonsmum

    bensonsmum PetForums Newbie

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    My border collie bitch had a singleton pup 2 years ago, whelped the day after her due date perfectly normally. Pup was normal size for the breed at birth, no whelping problems at all. Good luck, hope things go well for your bitch too!
     
  6. johee

    johee PetForums Newbie

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    Singletons have a considerable measure in opposition to them. Just 50% exist. It begins in utero, they get greater, for example a fish that develops to the measure of its bowl, so they are harder to get out. Off and on again one puppy is not enough to furnish the required hormones to make the dam go into work. In the event that you have not done a x-beam or a ultrasound, this may go ahead you out of the blue; this is why I Constantly do a x-flash. A singleton can additionally hazard the essence of your dam.
     

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    #6 johee, Nov 20, 2012
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  7. muse08

    muse08 PetForums Member

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    A friend of mine had a bitch with a singleton puppy last year,she whelped with no complications at all and the pup was of normal size.
    As far as the scan goes an numbers,some vets are not very good at predicting numbers.I bred my pug girl last year the vet said he thought he could see 2- maybe 3 pups maximum on the scan.She actually whelped six healthy pups...perhaps you could get a mobile scanner to come to the house in a week or so to scan again as they may be able to be a little more accurate with numbers.
     
  8. Bellasmaid

    Bellasmaid PetForums Senior

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    I've just taken on a singleton pup and her mum. She came into my care when the pup was just a few hours old. The mum gave birth normally and the pup was fine. As this is the first time of handling a singleton, I am worried how things are going to pan out for this little girl as she gets bigger and older.

    At the moment the pup is just 3 days old and seems to be doing well.

    All I can say is good luck and hopefully everything runs smoothly for you
     
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