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Silly friend

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by suewhite, Mar 25, 2011.


  1. suewhite

    suewhite PetForums VIP

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    Just been round to a friends for coffee she has a son who is 22 years old he earns £217 after stoppages and she does"nt take anything for his keep she said you are only young once and she would feel awful taking money from him,I think she is stupid as she is always hard up,she buys everything for him even shampoo:rolleyes:
     
  2. JANICE199

    JANICE199 PetForums VIP

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    She isn't doing any favours is she?It will find it very hard if and when he finds a place of his own.:)
     
  3. 2lisa2

    2lisa2 PetForums VIP

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    its about teaching them the value of money i wouldnt want to give my kids a free ride then they get the shock of their lives when it comes time for them to want to leave home :)
     
  4. cheekyscrip

    cheekyscrip Pitchfork blaster

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    at least he earns!!! hope she does not give him money, though....
     
  5. toria

    toria PetForums Senior

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    Oh dear..he's in for a shock when he gets into the real world...Mum should take something from him,even if she puts it away it would be a nice little lump sum when he leaves.

    If she has no money & is hard up like you say then he isent really respecting his mum by not giving her anything.
     
  6. Chinquary

    Chinquary PetForums Senior

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    I know someone who took about £50 rent from their kid, then when they moved out after however many years, gave it all back to them so they could furnish their new place. Thought it was a good idea. They also brought all their own essentials like toiletries and brought some food shops etc.
     
  7. theevos5

    theevos5 PetForums VIP

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    I took keep off my eldest son now 21,saved it up and then when he moved out I paid his deposit and his first months rent in advance on his flat,Mind you,when I was taking it off him,you would have thought I was mugging him every month the whinging that he did!But he didn't know I was saving it for him or I think he may have been a bit more grateful!
     
  8. harley bear

    harley bear PetForums VIP

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    Thats exactly what we are going to do with our kids.
    When they have full time jobs i will be asking for about £100 per week off them half will go towards food and bills and the other half will be put into an account ready for when they leave home.
    I know £100 might sound a bit much but its nothing when you consider they will be getting everything done for them and half the money saved for them! Not going to tell them that tho:nono:
     
  9. vickie1985

    vickie1985 PetForums VIP

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    what a wally she is.

    at 15 i was buying my own little bits of shampoo mainly coz i didnt like what my parents used lol at 17 when i left college i was paying my parents and buying my own toiletries/clothes
     
  10. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    I have to admit to being the guiltiest one for this. When my girls started work, we were quite well off and didn't need them to pay their way, so it seemed mean to take anything off them. My youngest daughter has always been tight with money and has never asked for anything, but the eldest one was a different story. I think perhaps it is a good idea to make them pay their way.

    My son who still lives with me only gets his severe disablement allowance, but I don't ever take anything off him, but if I am short he does pay for the shopping or petrol. Not often, but I could never take money off him for food; it just wouldn't seem right. He pays for all his own clothes and his mobile phone bill (colossal) and anything else he wants, like his holidays, but not for food.
     
  11. purple_x

    purple_x PetForums VIP

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    I have a friend whose parents were the same with her all her life, she never had to pay a penny for anything and they paid off her student loans and brought her a car.
    And now at 27 she still lives at home because she doesn't have a clue about how to pay her own bills or anything, she tried but moved back home after a few months.

    My parents were never well off or anything so I always had to pay something. When I was 15 I had 3 paper rounds and babysat 2 evenings a week, I made £50 a week and gave £15 of that to my parents.
    When I turned 16 I was full time college and also got a part time job as well as my paper rounds and started giving more money to my parents as well as starting to buy my own toiletries and things.
    When I got a full time job earning £300 a week I started paying £75 a week and was buying all my own food and other things.

    Now as an adult living in my own house I can budget my money and pay all my bills.
    I moaned like hell at having to give my parents money, i used to yell at them that if they didn't have me I wouldn't have to pay anything!!
    But now I see that they did me a favour and taught me early on how to be responsible with my money.
     
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