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Should this dog have been put up for adoption?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by DirtyGertie, Apr 5, 2011.


  1. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    I know a couple who have always had dogs, usually two at a time. They have all been rescues. When one of the dogs died it wasn't long before another was adopted. Some came from friends who could no longer keep their dog for whatever reason, some from rescue. The dogs are loved and well cared for, taken for lovely walks (rural area) and as one of the couple is retired now they have plenty of company.

    Their most recent addition is a lurcher from a rescue (not sure which) and they already have a cross breed, about the size of a small labrador, which they've had for a few years.

    This lurcher "came with a 14 page CV outlining it's problems" (their words) although I don't know what was on it.

    To date the lurcher has killed their neighbour's cat and attacked a sheep (sheep survived). Not much remorse was expressed when the cat was killed other than "Well, it is a lurcher!"

    I am surprised it was up for adoption considering it already had a list of problems. Just wondering what other people think.
     
  2. PoisonGirl

    PoisonGirl Banned

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    Well if it's never bitten people before, what's the problem?
    They were given a 'CV' so they should have been more than aware of what was 'wrong' with the dog before they got it.
    I think as long as the new owner is aware of everything they need to know, then yes the dog should be given a chance.
     
  3. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    Well, if they aren't bothered about their dog killing the neighbours cat or it worrying sheep, then quite honestly, it doesn't matter how many dogs they've had, they don't deserve one. They're lucky it hasn't been shot by the farmer if it's been worrying sheep.
     
  4. Milliepoochie

    Milliepoochie PetForums VIP

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    If they know the dog has a history or they dont know its history they shouldnt be letting it off. :mad:

    It sounds like irresponsible new owners to me rather than the dog shouldnt of been given another chance. It is possible for the most dogs with 'issues' / those who cant be let of lead to still enjoy a normal life / long walks in the country and exercise safely.
     
  5. Alice Childress

    Alice Childress PetForums VIP

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    If they were given all the information, and were able to handle/manage any issues, then I think the dog deserved a new home.

    However, this...

    ... makes me really angry! "Well, it is a lurcher"!?? What an unbelievably selfish, dismissive response :mad: My cat was killed by a dog a year ago. It was a truly devastating experience. I don't blame the dog. I fully blame the owner. This dog was known to have attacked before and yet was off lead, not muzzled and the owner who saw the attack did nothing more than pathetically attempt to call the dog away once.

    So although the lurcher deserved a new home, if this specific couple can not handle the dog, the couple should not have homed the lurcher - and given their attitude over the cat I don't think they can. It amazes me how there is a certain sort of person who would put a dog down for killing another dog and yet with a cat "the dog is just being a dog".

    EDITED TO ADD: Obviously an emotive issue for me given what happened to my cat :( So just wanted to add again that I really don't blame the dog who did it, nor do I blame the lurcher in the post above. I blame irresponsible owners.
     
    #5 Alice Childress, Apr 5, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2011
  6. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    I don't actually know if it has bitten people before, I don't know what problems they were actually made aware of. I believe in giving every dog a chance and I know this dog would do very well with some of the members of this forum as I know that training is taken seriously from the posts I've read. The couple, however, don't take training that seriously despite loving their dogs very much. I do feel rather sorry for the dog, yes it's gone to a loving home but I think it would be much better placed with people who would be happy to work on it's problems. Maybe the rescue was more interested in placing the dog than finding it the right new owner.

    It did cross my mind that they were lucky the farmer wasn't around because he would have been within his rights to shoot it.
     
  7. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    It depends on the circumstances the cat was killed in - the lurched could have just caught the cat if it was in his garden or whatever. However if the dog has also attacked a sheep, it sounds as though they let it off lead, which is very irresponsible :( however, their reaction to the dog killing the cat is inexcusable.

    The dog should definitely have been rehomed, but perhaps not to this couple.
     
  8. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    So sorry to hear that Myfynwy. The same thing actually happened to my nephew's cat last year, the next door neighbour's dog killed it.

    As you can see from my pic, we have a small fluffy white dog. When they told me about this incident they also said if he came across our dog she would not stand a chance, their dog would kill it. I have to say that I was shocked by that, it sounds as though they've taken no steps to ensure it doesn't happen again either by way of muzzle, training, etc.

    Fortunately we don't live close to them, they live a few miles away.
     
  9. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    Yes, they do let it off lead, there are field and coastal walks nearby. Not sure if the cat was actually in their garden or whether they were out on a walk at the time.
     
  10. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    I cannot see any reason why this dog shouldn't be rehomed, but I find this couple's irresponsiblity a little worrying. They may love their dogs, but love is not enough. I know many seem to forgive all sorts of things if the owner loves it's dog, but there has to be a responsibility when owning dogs and these owners don't seem to have it. Sadly they don't seem to realise that they could be signing the dog (they profess to love) 's death warrant by not taking seriously the issues and addressing them.
     
    #10 rocco33, Apr 5, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2011
  11. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    That's terrible that they know just what the dog is capable of but do nothing to prevent it :( it's people like that who give lurchers a bad name :(

    Have they always been so daft? You'd think they would be more experienced having owned plenty of dogs in the past :(
     
  12. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    I would say they are inexperienced with a dog who has problems. Their previous dogs, and the current other one, have been well adjusted, family pets, sociable with people and other dogs.
     
  13. metaldog

    metaldog PetForums VIP

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    I don't see any reason for the dog not to have been re-homed.

    If Bizkit was to come across a cat in my garden he would kill it if he could get hold of it. He HATES cats, he's got a high prey drive and it is because he's a lurcher type, it isn't something that can be trained out. Some dogs weren't socialised with cats and see them as prey. I don't see that as a reason for them to not be in a loving home.

    The incident with the sheep could have happened to anyone who rescued a dog, they haven't had the dog long and it may just be teething trouble. I know I had loads of teething trouble when I got Bizkit. I say good on them for taking on a dog which is obviously not the easiest dog to re-home and I wish them all the luck in the world :)
     
  14. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    I agree, but if they do see small animals as prey, then they should be muzzled while out IMO.
     
  15. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    So they've perhaps 'bitten off more than they could chew' for want of a better phrase :(

    Are you friendly with them? Might be worth suggesting a behaviourist or something? It won't help much with the high prey drive but they might listen to a behaviourist telling them to keep him under control, or may be able to help in other areas :)
     
  16. Devil-Dogz

    Devil-Dogz PetForums VIP

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    Yes this dog deserved to have been rehomed just as much as any other - however sounds like the rehomers faild to find a suitable match (that being with an experience, responsible owner!).
     
  17. metaldog

    metaldog PetForums VIP

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    So every terrier, lurcher, sighthound & siberian husky should be muzzled while out? It is easy to manage a dog with a high prey drive with training (maybe not the sibes but the others) there is no need for them all to be muzzled IMO :)
     
  18. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    No, I didn't mean to imply ALL dogs with high prey drive should wear muzzles, but clearly this dog has a problem with small furries. Putting a muzzle can be a part of managing it IMO. The owners dont' seem to be clued up/interested in training so this would seem the best solution. I know plenty of greyhounds/lurchers that wear muzzles for this reason, but I also know many who don't. I don't see a problem either way (and I hate the stigma attached to dogs wearing muzzles - to me it just shows a responsible owner).
     
  19. shibby

    shibby PetForums VIP

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    Yes, he/she should have been up for adoption. Our eldest dog came out on a disclosure, which meant he couldn't be trusted around cats (not socialised with them, though he's been attacked by a cat so he's scared of them) and because his last 'owner' said he 'went for her' :rolleyes:. It's protocol for good rescues to tell you all history they have on a dog. I wouldn't want to have a cat around them though after their response :nono:
     
  20. SixStar

    SixStar Banned

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    There is absolutely no reason why the dog shouldn’t have been rehomed. If dogs who are likely to chase and kill small animals shouldn’t be rehomed, then that’s probably the vast majority of Greyhounds and Lurchers. It does however, sound like the dog shouldn’t have been rehomed with this couple.

    To them, the cat may have only been ‘’just a cat’’, but it was somebodys much loved pet. They wouldn’t like it if another dog came along and mauled and killed their Lurcher, because ‘’that’s what dogs do’’.

    My greyhounds are ex-racers with a huge prey drive, they’d chase and kill a cat, rabbit, fox, tiny dog without question- hence why they are always on leads and muzzled. I do let them off in an enclosed area, but even then, muzzles still stay on. We live very rurally, nobody around to have cats, but I still wouldn’t forgive myself if they caught something, or learnt it was ok to catch things- because they still have to be around cats and tiny dogs in the vets waiting room, and I have a small dog myself.

    I hope these people realise the errors of their ways before this dog kills another, or gets itself shot dead by a farmer :(
     
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