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Should I get rid of my cat?

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Jane Maye, Jul 31, 2018.


  1. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    We decided to spay our female cat a month ago. Because of that, I thought it would be best for her to live in my bedroom. 2 weeks after the surgery, however, we noticed that she had gotten ringworm. We were very scared because all of our previous cats had gotten it as well. Some members of my family are prone to this skin infection and so our previous cats were given away. Right now our current cat is hospitalized because we got the infection again and it was really hard to take care of her.
    My family is worried that if we get her back she will get ringworm again. I just don't know how to prevent it from happening. We don't let my cat roam outside. This time she got the infection because of her weakened immune system after the surgery. They want to get rid of her, but I just can't give her away because of something like this.
    Will she get ringworm again in the future and is it safe for her to stay at home? What do you think..?
    Thank you for your time! :)
     
  2. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome :)
    Firstly NO I don't think you should get rid of her! This is not her fault.
    Secondly, I believe it is notoriously difficult to get rid of ringworm and it sounds like your home might still have traces of it which is why you and your cats keep getting infected.
    What measures have you taken to treat your home?
     
  3. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    All of the mentioned previous cats have been in different places. We have changed houses quite a few times. This happened in a completely new house that wasn't owned by anybody before us. So there is no chance that this is happening because of that. I was afraid to set foot in my bedroom, and i still am even after cleaning!
    But it is just really sad because all our cats get it from somewhere and on top of that- we are prone to it. I myself am covered in red spots right now and it's really hard to deal with them. We decided to give the cat to a woman that is going to take care of her. I really want to get her back after everything is fine..But I don't know if we will be getting her back.. I really hope we do!! But as I said, we're afraid it might happen again
     
  4. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Do you spend time around horses?
     
  5. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    Presumably, when you move, you don’t leave your furnishings behind and buy all new? If not, it’s likely you are carrying the infection with you as the infected dead skin cells are present in your furnishings.

    It sounds to me like you need to treat your home. I would not get rid of my cat. If you do, as you say you have with others, I strongly recommend that you stop getting cats.
     
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  6. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    I've found this, not sure if you have followed all of the recommendations regarding environment

    https://icatcare.org/advice/cat-health/dermatophytosis-ringworm-cats

    I hope the lady who has taken your cat in is aware of the consequences.
    The ringworm seems to be following you, I suspect it is because you have not eradicated it from your possessions. I asked before, what measures have you taken to treat the environment?
     
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  7. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    Taken off a website:

    How Do Cats Get Ringworm?

    A cat can get ringworm directly through contact with an infected animal-or indirectly through contact with bedding, dishes and other materials that have been contaminated with the skin cells or hairs of infected animals. Ringworm spores are notoriously hardy.....
     
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  8. Amanda Sturdy

    Amanda Sturdy PetForums Member

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    We had cows what had it and the shippon where they where had to be disenfected every week no cows where allowed back in for six months all the walls where blasted and repainted the spores stay active long after its gone
     
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  9. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    They can stay active up to 12 months,
     
  10. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    No we haven't moved anything with us. It has been years since we actually had another cat. Almost 15 i would say. This is why we DO NOT get cats. But one day after a storm we found 2 little kittens in our backyard .. and so we decided to pick them up and keep them inside for a while. One of them ran away but the other couldn't even move so we kept it.
    And to be honest we've had our cat for an year now, and everything was fine. We kept her in a room next to our house for a few months and then thought we would bring her in my bedroom. And after spaying her she got ringworm.
    The vet told us it was because of weakened immune system but the others are afraid she will get the infection again sometime
     
  11. Amanda Sturdy

    Amanda Sturdy PetForums Member

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    She would have had to have direct contact with an infected animal or indirectly through clothing,towels any furnishing the spores are very hardy and will survive up to 18months
     
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  12. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    The vet said that because of the surgery she was stressed and her immune system weakened which is why she got the infection.
     
  13. Amanda Sturdy

    Amanda Sturdy PetForums Member

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    She would have had to be incontact its not something what just happens anti fungal treatment should get rid of it but if you have already had her home then it will be already in your home
     
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  14. Sacremist

    Sacremist Mum to 2 cats and a dog

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    She would still have had to have contact with the spores, because it is a fungal infection and the only place she could have got it from is your home if as you say, you kept her indoors.

    I should also add that if your family are getting it too, then they are also shedding dead skin cells infected with spores.
     
    #14 Sacremist, Aug 1, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
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  15. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Cats don't just get ringworm from being stressed. As others have already explained. I've had cats all my life and never had an issue with ringworm.
    You've not said how you treated your cat and home to get rid of it so I am assuming you must still have it in your house. It's the only way you and your cat got infected.
     
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  16. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    Poor cat :(
     
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  17. SuboJvR

    SuboJvR Joey’s Mummy

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    This is why she was susceptible to the infection. Ringworm is opportunistic, it takes advantage of weakened immune systems that can't fight it off. In this manner it is similar to thrush, another fungal infection, which humans (especially ladies...) often get after a course of antibiotics which wipe out a lot of the good bacteria. Steroid inhaler users are also prone in the mouth, and it's also often seen immunocompromised people.

    But she has to get it from somewhere, and if the people in your home are also "prone" to ringworm it suggests either someone is still infected without realising, or you have spores around your home that are re-infecting both you and your cat.
     
  18. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    Well, we have no idea where she got it from.. Our house is cleaned regularly and there is little t no chance that someone is still infected.. I think that ringworm, when left untreated, lasts for about 2-3 years? I'm not certain, but I feel like if someone does have the infection, then others are going to get it as well and realize. Ringworm is easily noticed, after all.. I don't know, I really want to know where exactly she got it from but I can't think of anything. I mean, i don't think she's been in contact with infected animals? At least at home she hasn't. Maybe something happened in the hospital after the surgery? Or there are infected animals roaming in our backyard?
    We have a dog as well but we haven't seen anything on her. She goes both in the backyard and in our house so she could have brought spores??
    What can i do to prevent this from happening.. It's just so..
     
  19. Jane Maye

    Jane Maye PetForums Newbie

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    I used bleach or rubbing alcohol (depending on the item) to disinfect everything that was left in my bedroom. We vacuumed the floor and washed our curtains, treated surfaces with antibacterial sprays and soap. Even if the bedroom has been cleaned, I am still not okay with going in or sleeping there. Not only I have ringworm myself, but I also want to make sure to treat all surfaces at least a few times before using them. Items that we own from previous infections are no longer contagious even if not treated (1-we would still have it, 2-ringworm,if left untreated, can't last more than 2-3 years) Or so do I believe..
    And yes, the lady is fully aware. The vet at the hospital said that our cat is no longer able to spread the disease so we should not worry too much.
     
  20. SuboJvR

    SuboJvR Joey’s Mummy

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    I'm not sure how much this would help. Must admit I'm not fully informed about the best methods for cleaning regarding ringworm, but antibacterial things will target bacteria, and ringworm is a fungus.
     
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