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Should I get a second dog?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by rescuecollieChip, Jun 4, 2017.


  1. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    I adopted my collie around 10 months ago, and as he has more than the usual issues I'm wondering whether to get a second dog (it would a foster, not permanent). There's no doubt that he likes being a one-dog family, and although he doesn't run around playing continuously with dogs, he does tolerate and say hello to them on walks.
    Around the house he has impeccable manners and would be a great role model for any newbie, but it's just on walks he has really serious noise phobias, which cause him to flee at the slightest noise. Would this cause the foster to catch on to his habits?
    I would wait a couple of months until the summer so that we have all day to spend with the dogs, and also if it turns out to be a nightmare there's more chance of the dog being adopted quickly.
    I'm willing to go out of my way to make it work, but Chip has been going so well lately and I don't want to ruin all our hard work by introducing a new obstacle for him.
    Any tips on how to make it easier or do people think it's a huge no-no?
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    As a fosterer, if you can acclimatise a dog to living in a home, and get them used to all that entails I don't see what the problem is personally.

    As long as you can offer separate walks, and the foster dog can cope with this, and your own dog too. Then this should not be a problem, if your main issue is out on walks.

    However it depends if a rescue sees you as fit to be a fosterer in the first place, which I hope they would.
     
  3. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your reply, the rescue I support has over 750 dogs, and they're desperately scrambling for anyone to help, so their criteria is pretty much if you will love the dog and provide basic care, you're in! (they're Romanian street dogs, and the situation is so horrible out there :()
     
  4. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Just be aware, with street dogs, you need to be ultra aware that they will want to run free. So it would probably be best to walk the dogs separate anyway so you can keep a close eye on the foster dog.

    Be aware of the safety in the home, 2 doors between exits etc, safe garden.

    If you think you are up to the job, go for it. However understand it may not be plain sailing, as many of these dogs have not lived in a house before, do not seem humans as good, so can need a softly softly approach with lots of patience. However if your dog can be a good house role model this may help, if the dog allows it. If you have back up from the rescue at all times, then go for it. Remember not all rescues are good, this goes for UK ones as well as foreign rescues. Hopefully this one is though. If they are putting dogs in foster homes to be assessed then that sounds really good in my opinion.
     
  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    If it were me, I'd wait. 10 months isn't that long for your first dog to settle and chances are he will improve considerably over the coming months. Then, the addition of another strange dog (s) should hopefully not create any major issues.

    I'd be worried about setting him back or creating more issues tbh and managing that at home 24/7 could be a strain.

    Of course, I understand why you want to foster, but maybe there is another way to help?
     
  6. Baskervillle

    Baskervillle PetForums Member

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    I just want to say, with romanian rescue dogs, if you end up fostering one/taking one on, please make sure the rescue has done assessments and has measures in place to make sure this dog will be suitable for your home/you/your dog. Many, many of the romanian rescues are said to be friendly, but beneath that many of them have a lot of issues like food aggression, fear aggression and generally may be quite feral and they can be hard to deal with. It's why so many end up with them escaping when they get them home - most of them are great escape artists and can scale fences, or if you let them off lead in an open space they may bolt.

    It's something to consider if your other dog is a rescue, you don't want the foster to teach your current dog bad habits. Many of the romanian rescues will have dogs who have had homes, but remember with street dogs a lot of their behaviour is genetic.

    I have one, I love him to bits. Does he act like a dog? Not really. I'd say he's more like a fox, honestly. I know that isn't the case with all of the street dogs, but I know many do not act very domestic.
     
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  7. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    Yes, that's probably my main worry. I'd love to have a foster, but Chip will always have priority and I just don't want to unsettle him. Thanks for the advice :)
     
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  8. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    They have so many dogs and they all live outside in shelters and runs, so I am actually quite worried as I don't think they assess them that thoroughly o_O they have a few well known breeds like Labs, and I know this doesn't secure a 'normal' dog obviously but Labs are known to be a bit more chilled and settle better than dogs like a Collie. Chip was actually an Irish stray, but he went to an unsuccessful home before I got him so I didn't actually experience him straight after him being feral. Thanks for your advice :)
     
  9. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    The way I trained my ex-stray collie was by having a long line clipped onto him so he could have some freedom while's I still had hold of him. Is this a good way to train recall? It worked for Chip but every dog's different ...
     
  10. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Use of a longline is brilliant for recall, although some dogs may never succeed. It's not always a fail on the trainer, could be a breed trait...you can probably train a husky recall on a longline, but it probably wouldn't be wise to test the training for dogs who are known to love to run. High prey drive may get in the way of others, it all depends on some variables such as the age of the dog, which could mean the dog has had plenty of time not to practise not returning.

    Off lead or onlead, a dog can still have a fulfilling walk.
     
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  11. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    So would you suggest I choose a younger dog, maybe under 1 year? They have a huge amount of dogs, so there's pretty much one of every breed, age, and gender!
     
  12. trio25

    trio25 PetForums Member

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    We got a second dog after having our first dog a year. He had some major issues and although fine with other dogs not that interested. We had to be honest and say that it was us that wanted another dog. It has worked really well but we did a lot of independent walking, the second dog turned out to be dog reactive although he came to us as apparently dog friendly, no issues with current dog though. We love having more than one dog but be aware that it is often at least twice the work!
     
  13. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    I always knew I'd have more than one dog. It was always on the cards to add another and I'm still desperate for a third

    I started seriously looking when logan was 12 months by which point he was largely very sensible, well mannered and trained.
    Maude finally arrived a few months later and Logan had no issues at all adjusting although management is still required around food as given half a chance, he WILL resource guard.

    Maude has been 10 times more work that Logan without a shadow of a doubt and as she is really quite a reactive dog, care has been taken to make sure Logan doesn't also become reactive.

    This means that I regularly walk them individually. Almost all training is done seperately. They're trained differently because they learn differently and because it's way easier to train them apart.
    They're basically inseparable but there have been a couple of spats because they're both fairly intense and if allowed to, can inadvertently wind each other up. We had one such spat of which I'm confident would have continued to escalate had I not waded in and pulled them apart.

    Apart from that, the juggling of two reasonably large dogs on long walks, the obvious additional expenses, the steep learning curves and the sudden lack of space in my bed, two dogs hasn't been a major adjustment over here although Maude specifically HAS been.

    I guess what I'm waffling at is that how doable/easy/otherwise it ends up being is as much down to the dogs as it is to you.
    Maude is HARD work. But she'd be just as much hard work on her own.
     
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  14. Baskervillle

    Baskervillle PetForums Member

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    That may work depending on the dog, but a lot of dog behaviour is genetic and inherited.

    I got Fen at 6/8ish months old, and his issues started to emerge as he grew older.
     
  15. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    Chip's issues only really started to come out after we'd had him a few weeks. We were told once he felt 'safe' he was able to show how scared he really was.
     
  16. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    Chip is most definitely happy being a one-dog family! The dogs at the rescue live in runs and are always with a big group of dog (at least 10+) do you think this would make the dog happier and better around dogs or just kind of sick of being around them? Thanks for your help x
     
  17. Chellie

    Chellie PetForums Member

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    I've got four Rommie rescues, one of which is brain damaged and has weird fears and very quirky behaviour. The others tend to just ignore her when she has a moment and it hasn't affected their behaviour or made them nervous themselves, in fact, one is so uber confident it has given the nervous one a bit more confidence herself.

    I have two medium/large sibling bitches and two small bitches who are all two years old (there's about 8 months between the four of them) and luckily they have never had a cross word between them, they happily share toys and food. The only time they eat apart is when they have meaty bones but once they have had a chew they very often swap. Maybe I have been very lucky but my friend has three Rommies (and two UK rescues) and hers are the same except she has to feed them separately aside will scoff everyone's food.
     
  18. rescuecollieChip

    rescuecollieChip PetForums Newbie

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    I would definitely feed them separately to try and eliminate any competition. I would also get a bitch so Chip doesn't feel as 'threatened' by a new canine in his territory! Thanks for your help x
     
  19. trio25

    trio25 PetForums Member

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    It depends if the dog is happy in that situation or just coping, its hard to know without knowing the dog. My dogs are happy living together but they don't play with each other, anything like that is with us. So the main difference to being in a one dog family is that there is another dog on the sofa etc. One of mine definitely likes that as suffers from a touch of separation anxiety and is fine if left with my other dog even though all they do is sleep. I can't imagine having one dog as love their different personalities but it is hard work as I try and walk them separately as much as possible and they both need their own playtime, training etc.
     
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