Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Should I castrate my 9 month old border collie

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Michelle&Sweep, Jun 20, 2020.


  1. Michelle&Sweep

    Michelle&Sweep PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    6
    Hi, sorry if this question has been asked numerous times, I have a nine month old border collie from farm stock. I've never underestimated that having a border collie would be easy! He has mellowed as he has got older. He uses his mouth a lot especially when he was younger when we want him to do things he doesn't want to do i.e getting him off the sofa, or put his harness on. It difficult to say if he is doing it out of fear or just showing he doesn't want to do it (if that makes sense!). Plus it is getting stronger as he is getting older. i have tried other ways such as using food as a way of getting him to do things but it doesn't always work.
    We've done puppy classes and then started at doggy day care. He has taken a liking to a female dog which according to the day care staff he is guarding, on Friday his 'friend' wasn't there he picked someone else to guard and then bit another dog that came over. The staff were brilliant but they have said he can't come until hes over this period they said he's is not coping with his hormones.
    Would having him castrated help with this? would it stop him from guarding? if he is a nervous dog would castration make him worse?
    Sorry for the long winded post just trying to give as much info.
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 8, 2014
    Messages:
    4,980
    Likes Received:
    12,155
    I am actually surprised that the Day Care centre takes entire male dogs - many don't in my experience - if they have unspayed females I hope they are supervising well :D

    Castrating does tend to control those behaviours that are fuelled by testosterone such as becoming overly interested in females with a view to procreation and subsequently guarding their female from other male dogs. My friends entire male Lab couldn't even be in the same training class as my female Lab when they were younger - he would pester her as soon as he was left off the lead!

    So in my experience yes, neutering would lower this drive to find a mate. However, I will say that if a behaviour becomes established (he practises it too much) then it can continue even after neutering - though the guarding of his 'mate' from other dogs should lessen, too.

    I think you have to decide whether you wish to continue with the Day Centre - and if you do, you may need to neuter him. His Testosterone level is still rising so his amorous behaviour will continue for some months especially in play settings. Is he nervous? If he is of a nervous disposition then some studies have suggested that neutering can effect 'confidence'. In my experience with general, outgoing, happy dogs it makes no difference to their personalities at all.

    Neutering won;t effect any of the other behaviours you describe such as being mouthy - that's all about calm, consistent training!

    J
     
    Lilylass, O2.0, Torin. and 5 others like this.
  3. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2014
    Messages:
    2,261
    Likes Received:
    4,293
    As @Jamesgoeswalkies.
    If you can keep him out of daycares for the time being, then I would work on the unwanted behaviours, and particularly lack of confidence, before making a decision about castrating.

    The issue very often with farm bred dogs is that they miss out on early socialisation and habituation, and this window of learning closes quite early. So you get a dog who isn’t good at dealing with stress or new things, and lacks confidence in his ability to cope in the world.

    You can help build his confidence by training, being clear and precise with your commands and rewarding well; not just with treats but tuggy toys, ball fetching or any other way he likes to play. Train lots and train things initially he can get right.

    Find a good obedience or agility course and give him something to do. One puppy course is nothing like enough for either you or him to understand one another or work together well.

    He needs to gain in self confidence before you think about castration. Castrating a nervous dog can tip them over the edge.
     
  4. Michelle&Sweep

    Michelle&Sweep PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    6
    Thank you for spending the time to reply, that is really good advice thank you. I'm on a waiting list for an agility course and because of covid we couldn't continue with our next set of obedience lessons.
    Thanks again
     
  5. Michelle&Sweep

    Michelle&Sweep PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    6
    Thank you for taking the time to reply, your advice was great thanks
     
    Jamesgoeswalkies likes this.
  6. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,679
    Likes Received:
    11,086
    He should be a year old before starting agility (with bones fully set and joints formed) unless it's puppy agility with no jumping. There's a lot you can do before starting to get him ready - get hold of the DVD Agility Foundation Training by Greg Derrett - which will give you a head start. The exercises will also aid to your general training in place of obedience classes. You could go to the KC website and download the list of exercises to be completed for the bronze, silver and gold good citizen tests, and start working through those.
    I agree with not neutering too early. And whilst some dogs suit the very intense and social conditions of daycare, I find it hard to see a farm-bred BC being calm and happy there.
     
  7. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Messages:
    28,584
    Likes Received:
    20,359
    As he is a large dog he should be don't until he is mature around 18 months old as said above he needs all his joints fully grown first.
     
    Michelle&Sweep likes this.
  8. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,679
    Likes Received:
    11,086
    Farm-bred BC's tend to grow to around 20kg - 25kg, medium rather than large. Early work - which will start at a minimum of 1 year with most likely a delay due to clubs having to revise their structures because of Covid so will be delayed and usually with a waiting list at the best of times - is ground-based with only very low jumps and not many of them. Unless the dog is overweight, there should be no problem starting at 12 months. The pre-agility DVD I suggested is solely ground exercises.
     
    niamh123, Torin. and Silverdoof like this.
  9. Silverdoof

    Silverdoof PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    172
    We had a very promising keen Boxer at one time and the club where pushing for us to start training at 9/10 months. We of course refused. Boxers generally speaking love agility. Happy days, happy memories.
     
  10. CheddarS

    CheddarS PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,928
    Likes Received:
    916
    Good clubs will start puppies on foundation agility. My 7 month old is doing foundation work..no jumping or repetitive work. Lots of fun and brain work. I would not castrate a nervous dog until older as they need the hormones for confidence. However you have to look at your lifestyle and the dog needs to fit that.
     
  11. Olaf1

    Olaf1 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2020
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    6
    In male dog, castration is often associated with the increasing of some diseases. There are really pros and cons in that. Concerning behaviour, it's more and more discussed.
    The most frequent issue is of course getting overweight, which increase the chance of getting other diseases for sure (Diabetes, Arthritis ...).
    You may give it a go with a supralorin implant. It's a reversible neutering which lasts for 6 or 12 months. If you can measure objectively the changes you wish for, then maybe you shall consider a surgical neutering.
     
  12. Jimmie O'Chutt

    Jimmie O'Chutt PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2020
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    10
    We had our mix-breed dog castrated when he was one year old. Now he is five and is healthy, happy, and active. He still guards his territory and barks at strangers. The only thing that has changed is his escaping habit.
    Maybe some castrated dogs can develop problems with age, but I did have that experience.
     
  13. Silverdoof

    Silverdoof PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    172
    Ours have always been fine too. Male & female.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice