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She's a good dog I swear

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Sunlark, Dec 6, 2018.


  1. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    Just kind of needed somewhere to vent because I'm feeling a bit like a bad owner and I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong.

    I, like most owners, like to think I have a smart puppy. She is mostly pretty well behaved. She picks ups tricks fast and knows a lot of them for 6 months, she'll walk on lead nicely (without people around), she'll wait to go through doors, her recall is great... So why can't I get her to stop jumping?!?

    I suppose I feel twice as bad because jumping dogs has always been a pet peeve of mine and I can't even get my own to stay down. Whenever she sees anyone those front legs come up and she's either straining at the end of the lead or launching herself at me and my house mates.

    It's not like we've been encouraging the behaviour, and she seems to realise it's not allowed became you can see the lightbulb moment go off for her when yet again no one is paying her any attention for jumping and she sits down. She just acts like she's not seen you in years and forgets everything in her excitement of seeing you again. Just woken up? Flips out when you're back. Left the room for too long? Flips out when you're back. Go to the loo? Flips out when you're back.

    She is slowly getting better, a little less jumping, maybe she doesn't freak out when one person enters the room. But I really would like to be able to go on a walk where I'm not apologising to every person I pass as I hold her behind me to stop them getting jumped on :(
     
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  2. Chatcat

    Chatcat PetForums Senior

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    Ah, she's a puppy - that's what they do! Seriously though, just keep on with the training, you will need to get a good 'sit' and a good 'watch me', and then she will behave out on a walk, but honestly, does anyone really mind a jolly puppy? If she was grown up it would be more serious, but I wouldn't worry too much, TBH. i wish my dog did more than raise an eyelid when I come in!! She's pleased to see you, that's all. She'll grow out of it.
     
  3. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    I guess it's just because she's quite a large puppy now that it worries me, there's a lot of children and small dogs on our walks and I don't want her hurting them in her over excitment. It is good to have her happy to see people though :)
     
  4. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Yes, that's very true. What's cute and may be acceptable in a small bouncy pup won't be in adulthood , which is why you need to train her now to be the dog you want.
    I'm not a trainer but I'm sure one of our knowledgeable members wil help you with this.
     
  5. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    Wanna know a secret?
    My three and a half year old lurcher will STILL occasionally attempt to turn into a pogo stick when he is really excited to see someone.
    He doesnt do it often and he certainly doesn't do it to me except by invitation but he ALWAYS jumps up at my other half (who thinks it's adorable) and certainly friends who always get him way over excited intentionally.
    I now have a rule...YOU wind up the lurcher and he is a YOU problem until he is sensible again... suddenly people realise how frustrating it is having to calm down an ecstatic pile of spaghetti and are getting better at not amping him up when they see him ;)

    For some time when we met new or certain people, I'd drop his lead and stand on it so that he couldn't jump. It may not have hurt him or been directly aversive but is an example of why I don't consider myself to be a "force free" trainer so I'm not really suggesting you employ the same tactic but certainly with Logan, it was what worked best.
     
  6. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    You have my utmost sympathy I too dislike jumping dogs my previous 3 have all happily been trained not to do it, although I admit my Rough collie didn't settle down to it until about 18 months. My current dog I have totally failed, initially, because she was totally in the habit when I got her aged 10 months but also because she is small and I struggle to get down to her level to reward her so to get a treat she has to give a little jump up.

    Finally, however, my real training issue is my husband, he loves the crazy greeting and encourages it. Until he can be trained not to encourage bad behaviour I have no hope.

    So my suggestion is to encourage the sit on greeting and then find out if you have a human training issue encouraging the problem. Kikopup has a great video on stopping jumping up but it doesn't work for me as it requires you to be able to bend and put treats on the floor.

    Forgive me for hijacking your thread but...

    Wanted husband trainer doesn't need to be force free!
     
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  7. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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  8. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    I know exactly what you mean! Training her was a nightmare especially at the beginning because everyone wanted to play with the tiny excited puppy. I had a few people I'd never met actually trying to pick her up when she was younger o_O Half of the battle was trying to figure out what to do to politely let people know I wanted them to leave her on the floor...
     
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  9. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    Y
    I think it would be impossible to be completely "force free" with my pup. If only because if I don't hold her back someone is getting bowled over! I might try standing on the lead. At the moment she just uses the lead to push against to stand up taller, which can't be good for her...
     
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  10. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    The key is to teach the behaviour you DO want rather than just trying to stop the behaviour you don't want.

    Now - it does take time so don't expect instant results.

    Teach a sit. And only allow people to pet and/or treat when your pup is sitting nicely.
    Otherwise let people know to not to interact - they can walk on by or fold their arms. Sometimes you might notice if you have stopped to talk to someone, your pup actually gives up bouncing about and sits without being told. Get in there fast with a treat for that!

    Carry plenty small treats to give to other people to give when she sits.


    This method worked for my pup. Especially at the top of the school lane. If any child looks like they might come over, she is straight into a sit! And she kind of shuffles about on her bottom to get noticed.

    It does take a while though so keep going and good luck!
     
  11. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    Indeed. I think that there is a big difference between "fear free" training (which is pretty achievable and realistic) and "force free". But that's just me splitting hairs over slmethin that grinds my gears really.

    Any way, as @tabelmabel says, employing extremely strongly conditioned obedience is your best option here. Butt on floor = good stuff happens but bouncy pogo-stick dogs get shunned and no acknowledgement.
    It's laborious but worth it.
    As for other people getting in your puppies space and ruining your training... god, do you have my sympathy! My gorgeous little blue eyes bundle of squiggly excitement was (and apparently still is) utterly irrisistable to strangers. It's infuriating.
    I'm afraid to say that I have just developed an even more spectacular resting bitch face and if polite requests to leave us be or not do certain things are ignore, I get sharp with people and remove my dogs from their reach.
    Remember, NOBODY has any right to assume they can handle and pet your dog in public. Ever. Don't feel pushed into letting them if you don't want to!
     
    #11 Katalyst, Dec 6, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
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  12. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    I definitely feel like having a puppy has helped me grow more of a backbone! At first I was too nervous to say much to other people until the woman who picked her up and started "joking" about stealing her away...
     
  13. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

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    Errrrrr......just last week I had a split lip because my NINE year old dog was super excited to see me, and he's a huge block head! :eek::rolleyes::eek::rolleyes::eek::rolleyes:
     
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  14. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    I should laugh..... but im sure you laughed at me when Maude accidentally bit my tit when she missed a ball whilst training... hahaha! :Angelic
    (In all seriousness... ouch! Hope that healed quick!)
     
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  15. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

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    It's when you're going "ow ow ow ow" which only serves to make them MORE excited......... :rolleyes:
     
  16. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    My dog, aged 7 at the time, brought tears to the eyes of a male visitor when she hit him where she shouldn't
     
  17. Rott lover

    Rott lover once you go black and tan you never come back

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    I found that a strong stop sit stay and lots of treats for doing so helped a lot.
     
  18. Sairy

    Sairy PetForums VIP

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    Yup, my Holly becomes a wriggling and screaming pile of GSD when she sees my friends who wind her right up. She's brought tears to mine and OH's eyes on many occasions with over-enthusiastic greetings - a fat lip, cut on the forehead, bosh in the eye, blow to the nose. It's all part of the fun :rolleyes:

    I agree with the advice given though. We managed to get ours so that she doesn't jump up at normal people (only those who get her over-excited) and I take a similar view to katalyst - if you wind up the shepherd then you have to face the consequences!
     
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  19. Sunlark

    Sunlark PetForums Junior

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    It's good to know I'm working along the right lines :) over-enthusuastic dog definitely seems to be a hazard of the job!
     
  20. Sarah1983

    Sarah1983 PetForums VIP

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    Mine thinks that if his front paws don't touch you he's not jumping up. He's 7. He doesn't just randomly jump at people these days, we managed to stop that somewhere around 18 months old after a lot of work, but if someone's fussing him, especially someone he knows, he'll often go up on his back legs.

    I've found being "rude" to people helps. If they encourage jumping walk away. If they refuse to wait until pup is sitting, body block them. People just cannot seem to get the message and while they're more than happy for say a 10 week old puppy to jump all over them they're usually not so keen when it's a fully grown, soaking wet, muddy, smelly Labrador doing it.
     
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