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Senior maltese wants to play all night.

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Mellissa, Feb 9, 2018.


  1. Mellissa

    Mellissa PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone, my maltese approximately 13 years has started being active at night, all night.

    She was recently sick, https://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/senior-maltese-losing-weight.471881/#post-1065091082
    off her food and lethargic, had her teeth cleaned and a benign tumour removed and after a change to chicken, veggies and brown rice recovered beautifully. Its great to see her happy again.

    Now every night i wake up with a maltese on my chest her favourite toy firmly held in her mouth tail wagging wanting to play. Over and over. She is happy but obsessed. The only other 'symtom' is panting at odd times, her heart and lungs appeared fine to our vet and her recent blood tests cleared her of cushings disease and a bunch of other things.
    In all other respects she seems well.

    I don't know if she is just feeling better or is this doggy dementia starting? Any ideas appreciated.
     
  2. Westie Mum

    Westie Mum PetForums VIP

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    Being awake during the night is one of the signs of Cognitive Dysfunction

    https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/neurological/c_dg_cognitive_dysfunction_syndrome

    There are meds that can help - supplements like Aktivait or meds directly from the vet. Although my oldie is on Aktivait, we did have a good chat with the vet before doing so and he thought it was worth trying before anything stronger. It did make an initial difference but doesnt appear to be working quite so well anymore (shes been on it for over a year) so she may need a little more help soon.
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    I don't know very much about canine dementia but I do know that in humans with dementia, disorientation in time (awake at night) does occur.
     
  4. Mellissa

    Mellissa PetForums Newbie

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    My heart tells me that this is what it is. My poor baby! I will go back to the vets and face it i guess. I am grateful she is still happy, she wags her tail the whole time she plays.
    I used to nurse seniors, many with dementia. We used to teach new staff that the residents not remembering being happy later didn't take anything away from the happiness they felt at any given time. So i am grateful she still has so much happiness in her day. Well her night really!
    Westie mum this is the second time you have helped me, thank you. I will talk to our vet about treatments.
    JoanneF you are right, in humans they call it sundowners. I am so sad to think of her fading.
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  5. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Its possible it could be a decline in cognitive function. The first thing you often see is more active and awake at night, and sleeping more in the daytime, as if night and day have become reversed. There are things that can help like Aktivait and senilife, and also veterinary only medications like vivitonin and Seligiline. They may be worth trying.
     
  6. Westie Mum

    Westie Mum PetForums VIP

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    You’re welcome :) I hope one of the meds will help.

    We really do have to make the most of the good times as they get older.
     
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