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Russian Blue in a small space and being allergic

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Yke, Mar 24, 2020.


  1. Yke

    Yke PetForums Newbie

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    Hey all,

    There's plenty of information to be found online however I'd like to hear some from owners as well.

    My girlfriend really, really wants to have a kitty. I like to make her happy but i don't think its a good idea even though i'm sure she'll be a perfect owner giving lots of love and attention to the cat.

    For me there's two big no's. 1. Im allergic(tested and all) 2. We live in a 55m2 appartment with only a balcony.

    Now the russian blue is supposed to be great in terms of hypoallergenic and social/attention needs but i still feel a cat can't be happy in such a small place. Despite play time and even walks on a leash(she'll go the length) I beg to differ. But like to know if a russian blue can actually be happy in a 55m2 appartment.

    Hope to hear from other owners in terms of allergies and living space.

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hello @Yke and welcome :)

    I'm afraid no cat is completely hypoallergenic, not even the Siberian breed, in spite of various claims that they are. I have not heard that the Russian Blue is known to cause fewer allergies, it may do perhaps, but it certainly is not hypoallergenic.

    It is the cat's "dander" that causes the allergic response (dander = skin flakes + the cat's saliva on their fur) and it can vary with each individual cat .

    I think with your known allergies and your fairly small apartment, having a cat would be a bad idea for you. If I were you I would stand firm against your girlfriend on this matter. After all it would be you who suffered constantly with the streaming eyes, sneezing, and itching, not your girlfriend.

    Perhaps you could suggests she considers getting a different type of pet e.g. a small dog maybe? (if you are not allergic to dogs). A dog would need walking twice a day though.
     
    #2 chillminx, Mar 24, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020
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  3. Maurey

    Maurey butler to a spoiled kitty

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    I agree with chillminx, but would also like to add that it may be worth contacting a breeder, and visiting their home for a few hours. Many cat allergy sufferers react to the FelD1 glycoprotein cats produce, and both Russian Blues and Siberians produce less of it. As far as I'm aware, Siberians have less of the protein that Russian Blues, so may be worth visiting a cattery with those first, and see how your allergy is with them (if you have severe allergies). That's the only real way to tell if you'll react to them, or not. Purportedly, 75% of people with cat allergies don't react to Siberian cats, but I've heard of those that react worse to them. I'm sure similar is true for Russian Blues, if less dramatic.

    Just be sure to have an antihistamine with you in case you do start reacting.
     
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  4. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    There is significant scientific research into hypoallergenic cats, and there are a number of breeds that can be termed hypoallergenic. I'm not familiar with all of them, I know Siberians are generally more hypoallergenic and a number of breeders will allow an allergy test. I don't know much about Russian Blues unfortunately, sorry
     
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Rufus15

    No, not so. Current scientific research shows there is no such thing as a 100% hypoallergenic cat.

    Humans are allergic to proteins in the cat's saliva. Cats are unique within the animal world because they produce a specific protein that other animals do not, which is why some people are allergic to cats and not to other animal species. This is known as the Fel d1 protein, and it's found in the cat’s skin, saliva and urine.

    When a cat licks its fur to groom itself, the Fel d 1-containing saliva dries and becomes an airborne allergen. The cat's hair is a vector for the allergen to get into the air.

    The closest breed to being hypoallergenic is the Siberian. People noticed that specific Siberian cats do not elicit as much of an allergic response as other cats. The difference could be that the Siberian has different levels of Fel d1 protein compared with other cats. However, that could also be true of some cats of other breeds.

    A 2017 study found multiple mutations in a small sampling of the Siberian’s genes that encode for the allergen, leading researchers to posit that possibly these mutations may play a key role in the allergenic properties of the Fel d1 protein.

    The conclusions of the 2017 study was that some cats of the Siberian breed might be regarded as "low allergen" (not hypoallergenic).

    https://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/4/4/63/htm.
     
  6. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    The Siberian breeders I personally know, and others around the world, work with UC Davis to ensure only low Feld1 level cats are bred, producing low level kittens that are commonly known as hypoallergenic.

    I would talk to breeders of various breeds, some who reply will have no actual knowledge outside of Google.
     
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  7. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @chillminx gave the most sensible response @Yke

    The term 'hypoallergenic cats' is misleading.

    Siberians as was said, are known to often carry lower levels of the protein that contains allergens.
     
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  8. Scouttie

    Scouttie PetForums Senior

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    I would advise your girlfriend strongly against this.

    the allergies will likely be triggered, and at some point she will have consider either rehiring you or the cat!

    If she decides to keep you, the poor cat would face having to adjust to a new home, assuming a suitable one could be found. Heartbreaking all round.
     
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  9. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @spotty cats

    It's reassuring to hear of the steps being taken by responsible Siberian breeders in conjunction with UC Davis, to breed kittens with low levels of Fel D1. Thanks for the info.:)
     
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